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The daily sentinel. [volume] (Grand Junction, Colo.) 1893-current, February 01, 1902, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86066870/1902-02-01/ed-1/seq-3/

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Economy
The difference in
cost between an alum
baking powder and
the highest-class
cream of tartar bak
ing powder would not
amount for a family’s
supply to one dollar
a year.
Dr. Price’s is the
standard cream of tar
tar baking powder. It
makes the food de
licious and healthful.
Note.—You cannot, if you
value good health, afford to
use cheap, low-grade, alum
baking powders. They are
apt to spoil the food ; they do
endanger the health. All
physicians will tell you that
alum in food is deleterious.
Tomorrow ia what ia known as "Ground
Hog” day. The atory, as it goes, ia that
if that animal cornea from hie winter
home and aees hia shadow that he will
return to hia hole and remain there dur
ing the next six weeks, indicating that
the weather will be atormy during that
time. If he should not see hia shadow,
he will remain outside hia hole, girin.’
evidence that the warm weather will
soon be upon ua.
The celebration of Cahdelmaa day will
take place in the St. Joseph's Catbolic
church tomorrow.
OIL! OIL OIL!)
1 THE GRAND VALLEY 1
I PETROLEUM & GAS CO. f
Has just been organized by Colorado Springs capitalists and Grand Junction business men. it
r . now owns over 9.000 acres of choice oil land in Grand Valley most of which is between this
® ri*v anH IVRpniie. A lartie Dart of the company's stock has been taken by Colorado Springs and
Hiis valley may share in the enterprise a limited
n this city at only 5 CENTS per share or fifty
the price will be raised to 10 cents per share,
s now receiving subscriptions for the stock.
Fully paid, nou-assessauis f
[CORPORATORS: 8
L MULKEY, Secretary! Assistant Postmaster. Grand Junction Colo.
K. GAYLORD, Treasurer; ?,°SS,o. Grand Junction. Colo. *
C. SCHUYLER. Director; Railroad Attorney. Colorado Springs.
©
sk will all be gone soon. |
iIiED AS SOON AS POSSIBLE
DEMAND FOR HOUR GLASSES.
Some Are Used for Keeping Tab om
Plano Practice.
"Moat people think that hour glass
es went out of style years ago,” said
a clerk in a Twenty-third street store
to the New York Sun. “along with
perukes and knee breeches, but as a
matter of fact we have more calls for
them today than we have had at any
time within the last ten years. That
this renewed popularity of the hour
glass augurs its unlversW acceptance
as a timepiece by the mbilsk genera
tion, I am not prepawed fca say. but if
such a renaissance were tH-become as
sured It would be no more surprising
than some of the other recent fads
based on a revival of lost customs.
Anyway a brief study of tse hour glass
will do nobody harm. There are thou
sands in this generation who have not
the slightest idea what an hour glass
looks like, and it won’t hurt them to
broaden their education a little along
certain lines. Of the hour glasses sold
at present the three-minute class is in
the lead. This glass is used almost
exclusively to measure time in boiling
eggs and its usefulness naturally
places its sale a little in advance of the
more sentimental varieties. Next
come the five, ten and fifteen minute
and full hour glasses, which are
bought chiefly by musicians for piano
practice and by lodges and secret so
cieties. The sand used in an hour
glass Is the very finest that the world
affords. The western coast of Italy
furnishes most of it. as it has done for
ages past. The cost of hour glasses is
regulated by the ornamentation of the
frames. A glass set in a plain rose
wood case can be bought for sl. while
a mahogany frame comes to $1.50 or
$2. Of course, the price can be brought
up still higher by fancy carving and
decoration. Swell lodges sometimes go
to this extra expense, but most people
are satisfied with the cheaper grades.’*
Samuel G. McMullin is in Deßeque
today.
1 here has been a large farmer contin
gent in the city today.
Col. C. C. Bower is down from Pali
sades and says that their company has
sold 66,000 shares of their stock and it is
going fast.
The Whitewater oil company is look
ing forward very expectantly to the arri
val of thair machinery. They will puah
work fast when it does come and be
ready as quickly as any other company
to tell what is contained in mother
earth.
FAMOUS HANGMAN INSANE.
Hie Ghostly Job Drov* Him to the Mod
home.
It was recently announced that
Amos Lunt, the famous San Quentin
hangman, who went mad as a result
of his grewsome duties, was dying in
the State Asylum for the Insane at
Napa, Cal. The career of Lent as a
hangman was a remarkable one, and a
full history of his life at the prison
would read like a ghastly romance
For seven years he filled the office of
state executioner, and nineteen mur
derers were hanged by him. It wag,
Lunt who threw the noose about the
neck of Theodore Durant and hasten
ed an execution already unduly pro
longed, while the murderer from the
scaffold was making his protestations
of innocence. On this occasion Lunt
was reported as being the coolest man
in the room, with the possible excep
tion of the condemned man himself. On
other occasions Lunt showed a nerve
of Iron. In one morning he hanged
three men and then sauntered from the
execution room smoking a cigarette.
But despite his apparent utter indif
ference concerning his work os a man
killer it was known my many of his
intimate friends that in secret he
brooded over it. Therefore it caused
little surprise when on falling into a
fortune about two years ago he prompt
ly resigned his position. Some months
later he returned to the position and
resumed his duties as hangman, al
though the prospect of arranging the
rope on another man seemed to appall
him. He constantly talked abou: it and
brooded over it, and suddenly one
morning the iron nerve snappec and
he became a hopeless madman. —Utica
Globe.
GRAND ARMY OF
THIS REPUBLIC
Grand Junction Post No. 35.
meets every Second ana
fourth Saturday at Odd
fellows Hall, Visiting Com
-mles welcome;
Wm Warner, Adj J R Fallis, Com
MESA LODGE NO. 66,
A. F. 9l A. M. Meets the first and third
Thursday in each month at Masonic hall
Canon Block, corner Fourth and Main Sta.
Wm Carlyle, Sec. A R Sampliner, W M
GRAND JUNCTION LODGE NO
B. P. 0. E.
Meet First and third Mondays
of each month-
J H GALLUPh JAMES SILCOX
Secretary E. R.
Rooming House
WITH I I ROOMS
FOB RERT
$35 PER MONTH
FOB SOLE!
TEN ACRES
with the best funning house in
Mesa County
$350.0
HTMONG,
Main St., Canon Block,
UR AND JUNCTION, COLO.
EXCELSIOR LAUNDRY
Cool weather is approaohing. Send us
f’oar Ane wool underwear ef yours and have
t made like oew, soft and olean. We do
family washings in any style desired. We
don’t have to uee chemicals to get linen
clear and white. Call on uo and we guaran
tee aatiafaotion. We deliver to any part of
eity. Excelsior Steam Laundry.
Frank Baehriag, Prop.
M usic.
Private Instructions Given on
Piano, Violin, Guitar, in
and all Orchestral and !
Instruments.
Nothing but standard up
material or methods u-rd.
and orchestra furnished for ■ <•
casions. Headquarters a
Thompson Jeweiry tV Mu. i
Music room corner oth & <'
S M BOYEF
Director Boyer’s Or rn,
Ladies’ Columbine i ,
Citizens Bund.
STRICTLY FIR
CLASS
BLUE FRONT
LIVERY BARN
Our Specialty
Is strictly up to date rubber
carriage* ami first class h
Sales stables in connection.
POST a BOYD
PROPRIETORS.
E. F. ELDRIDGE,
Physician and Sur 0v jn
OMoe and Laboratory <>v»r Unpton Bh<> •>
Main street. All medicine* famished
ova laboratory.
Telephone Red 633
Telephone B. 6 and 0.
L. F. INtfVBSOLL,
Physician, and Surge •>
Surgeon for Color ido Midland, ' fc
R. G. and Rio tvramiH »* MMiern .
OFFICE: Rooms 1& I, l!o>* «• ' i,
BHHIDENCK; White Bt. uetween Bth a <1
SAMUEL N. WHEEL R
Attorney-at-Law
Grand Junction, Colora n

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