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The daily sentinel. [volume] (Grand Junction, Colo.) 1893-current, March 28, 1903, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86066870/1903-03-28/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE DAILY SENTINEL.
Vol. X
TOILET SOAPS
WE HAVE THEM
FROM
sc. to 50c. per caKe.
For sale by
C. D. SMITH & CO.
PAYS TO TRADE WITH US.
John E. Phillips, Pres.
W. J. Moyer, Vice Pres.
Max Buchtimnu. Cashier.
L. VVickerahain, Ant. Cashier
tub Grand valley
national Bam
CAPITAL $50,000.
is absolutely no legit
imate feature of the bank
ing business for which we
are not prepared.
Foreign Exchange.
Safety Deposit Vaults.
The Salt Lake Candy Co.’s
famous
Carnation
Chocolate
Creams
HASKELL’S PHARMACY.
FRANK LESLIE
General
COLLECTIONS.
Call for Terms
Office with Judge Jos. P. Swenej
543 Main Street.
INSURE WITH
C. B. Rich
Fire, Life, Accident, Plate Glass,
and Health Insurance. Lowest
rates consistent with safe under
writing. Best companies.
OFFICE OVER FAIR STORE.
THE TASTE DISPLAYED
in framing a picture either makes
or mars its beauty. It costs no
more to frame a picture right. We
frame pictures at
FOTOGRAFER DEAN’S.
GOVERNMENT
SCANDAL.
Promises to Surpass the Famous
“Star Route” Case-—George
W. Beavers has Resigned.
Washington. March 27. —What
seems likely to be the most extraordi
nary government scandal since the
celebrated Star route fraud has been
precipitated by the resignation of
George W. Beavers, general superin
tendent of division of salaries and al
lowances of the postottice department.
His resignation has been accepted and
will take effect March 81.
Beavers had been in the postal ser
vice upward of twenty-two years. He
was not forced out of the service, and
his resignation was not asked for, but
was offered and accepted because the
first investigation by a special detail
of postoffieft inspectors under the di
rection of Postmaster General Payne
and by special orders from President
Roosevelt himself developed a condi
tion of rottenness mid fraud the extent
of which no one can predict.
It is a secret known only to a few
ueople that after the consultation
with Postmaster General Payne a
diort time ago President Roosevelt
ordered a searching investigation
should be made into the stories which
had been ouireut in Washington for a
year regarding the gross corruption,
immorality and fraud in some of the
most important executive bureaus of
the postoffice department.
Acting under the direction of the
president, Fourth Assistant Postmas
ter General Bristow, who has charge
of the postoffice inspectors, began an
investigatiou of the charges freely
made of late that there was gross cor
ruption manifest throughout the sys
tem of supplies for the postottice de
partment. This was also true through
The ramifications of the free delivery
service, including letter boxes and
snuplies for carrires, both in city and
country.
General Bristow is the o.ficial who
operated so successfully in Cuba and
who unearthed there the frauds
which put Neely and Rathboue behind
prison bars.
The postottice inspectors at work on
the case, most of whom were fresh
from the Cuban investigation, have
already discovered evidences of system
of division of urofits among certain
officials in the postottice department
and interested manufacturers. It has
become apparent that registering time
clocks, safes. canceling machines,
twine, wrapping paper, postottice
boxes, mail bags, pens, pen holdu-s,
rubber stamps and stationery and all
the manifold supplies of the postottice
department were bought in enormous
quantities and supplied to postmasters
at a rate far exceeding anything need
ed.* and that almost every contract of
this description is tainted with fraud
involving a system of division be
tween the manufacturer and the
guilty postottice official.
The evidence thns far in the hands
of the postottice inspectors is entirely
general. It has been imjKJSsiblp yet
to go into detail. All they know' is
that almost every article used in the
postottice for years has been forced to
pay toll to a corrupt gang whose op
erations have been centralized in
Washington. In many cases the
prices at which supplies have been
sold have not been exorbitant, but
the game has been worked by forcing
supplies upon postmasters and the
railway service, requiting them to use
time clocks and canceling machines
which were neither necessary nor
economical, although quite desirable
on general principles.
The original fund of the i>ostoflicc
department, and the United States
treasury has to be drawn upon only to
the extent of making good the deficit
between receipts and expenditures of
postoffices. This renders possible the
scheme of looting which could not be
carried on successfully in other de
partments.
The postoffices of the country re
quire in their legitimate demand an
enormous amount of supplies, which
in the aggregate are exceedingly cost
ly. An ordinary commission on such
supplies would be quite sufficient to
keep a crowd of office swindlers and
blackmailers in clover. Not satisfied
Grand Junction, Colorado, Saturday, March 28, 1903.
with this, however, they have adopt
ed a scheme of riotous expenditures
for these postottice supplies. It is
said, for instance, every letter box 011
the street corners in the United States
has paid toll to someone, and these
boxes cannot even be painted without
a commission being paid certain in
terested officials.
The result has been that, although
the investigatiou has progressed
scarcely beyond the initial stages, and
although the postmaster himself is
absent on account of sickness, the de
partment is w’holly torn up. and there
is already indication* of immediate
and sweeping changes iu the person
nel and excellent prospects that some
men now in the service of the United
States may coijtiune to serve Uncle
Sam from the wrong side of the cell
door.
Connected with this development is
one also concerning a certain amount
of gross immorality on the part of
some of these same men, but for the
time being this feature is not being
pressed.
President Roosevelt is appalled at
the evidence already secured, and
while no charges have been formally
filed against Superintendent Beavers,
his resignation after twenty-two
years’ service is sufficient indication
of the panic iu the department caused
by au honest investigation conducted
by incorruptible officials acting under
the personal direction of the postmas
ter geuoral and the president.
Mr. Beavers’ successor will be a
western man.
AT THE SHOW.
Number 0 which brought the
4 ‘Lovers’ Lane’ ’ company into the
city last night was about two hours
late. When they did arrive they lost
no time in getting up to the theatre
and hoisting their scenery and unpack
ing their trunks. Manager Haskell
had stage hands to the number of
fourteen to put tha boards iu shape
for the eyes of the audience. Tlu;
curtain for the first act was raised
some minutes after nine o’clock.
Then began a very amusing the in
teresting. semi-farcical comedy.
The plot of the play was not deep.
It dealt with the W'oos and trials of a
young minister of a small New York
town where the people spent much of
their time iu fertilizing the seeds of
scandal and raising large crops of
gossip. It pictured a condiiton which
is true as life iu about five-sixths of
the communities over the country
where a young preacher with new and
up «to date ideas steps into a pulpit
and attempts to brusli away the cob
webs of orthodox conventionality that
have been left by his antique prede
cessor. It showed too with what
breathless anticipation an old-maid
fnl and young-girl-ful and ambitious
mother-ful congregation awaits the
choosing of a wife by the young min
ister. And it depicted their annoy
ance and provocation, by no means
concealed, when the king selects a
princess from without his own realm.
The acting of the various parts was
wholly satisfactory. There should
have been a larger audience. Every
Brady production ought to draw well.
VOTED FOR MANY PRESIDENTS
New York. March 26. —Born iu
1802, in this city. Isaac B. Price is
celebrating today his 101 birthdays.
During the life of Mr. Price lie has
only once been outside of the city
limits: He has never been out of the
state and lias never rode on a trolley
car, and. although he has crossed the
East river many times, he has never
been over the Brooklyn bridge. He
takes great pride iu his long life.
“I think it is duo.” he said ‘‘to
the fact that J thoroughly masticate
my food and that 1 have never drank
liquor or smoked. I have chewed to
bacco, however, since I was a boy. I
have always taken a whole hour to
each meal, sometimes more. If peo
ple nowadays would only take time to
masticate their food properly, there
would not be such trouble from indi
gestion and dyspepsia and they would
live longer. ’ ’
Mr. Price cast his vote in 1825 for
John Quincy Adams for president and
voted at every presidential election
since.
The special sale at the Mesa Dry
Goods company lias attracted many
ladies who wish to take advantage of
the bargains which are so numerous
at that store.
J THE MESA DRY GOODS COMPANY.
(Graud Junction’s busy t-tore.)
! ■■ 0
SPECIAL
FOR
MONDAY
MORNING.
5
! H
-j 1
: 5,000 sheer Daimy Dimitics: re9u " 5 000 “
J W Jar 15 cent quality for •JjVW ;
i
M
H

'it
9c. PER YARD. 9c.
j |
THE MESA DRY GOODS COMPANY
Telephone 106 Mesa.
•/........Y.’i.Yi.■V.iY.t..VfviVf'i MUM W.'.WIY.V.W.Y..Y.V.V.ViVW<W.«
Our two stores are crammed full of the
j BEST SPRING GOODS. (
An extra large line of Iron Beds.
5 See Gunn’s Sectional Book Case. 5
1 A. L. GOURLEY I
•z 3*
S 452 to 456 Main Street. Phone 35-2; Res. 35-4 si
Undertaker and Licensed Embalmer. Lady Assistant.
f >
Spring Goods
CLOTHING AND GENTS FURNISHINGS.
J. H- ACKERMAN
V. V
•r^sjv\Bsa^>>«s*sßsvva^s^Niu« k >
j W. H. Bannister
? THE LEADING FURNITURE MAN
? Has branched out with a Double Store. |
I FINE FURNITURE j
A Specialty.
■ Our Chinaware Department is a New featnre of our store. ■
t £Jr}dertakii?<§ if? all its brapefyes. jj
» nß/BVB •
Just arrived a complete line of ®
* S
| Silver Grays > |
All the rage for Spring Suits.
S' s
*407 Main. Taii ° r - 2
% §
The Daily Sentinel 50 Cents per month.
50c. per Month

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