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The daily sentinel. [volume] (Grand Junction, Colo.) 1893-current, June 30, 1909, Image 1

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1893 The Leading Daily Newspaper of Western Colorado---1909
R EAD RATIONAL AND
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BALL SCORES THE DAY
0 MES ARE PLAYED,
EITHER ON SENTINEL
BULLETIN OR IN THE
PAPER.
VOL. XVI.
BIGGEST SERIES
EVER PLATED
IN CITY
Saturday, Sunday and Monday Grand
Junction and Glenwood to Strug
gle for State Championship.
GLENWOOD HAS A NEW LINEUP
Saturday, Sunday and Monday will j
probably witness the last series of
sanies between the Grand .function;
and Glenwood Springs clubs this
year and to win the state champion- 1
ship (i leu wood must win all three of j
these. Glenwood has spent a pile
of money on her team this year and |
will put up a hard light to do ihis. |
Sandusky, one of rue best college |
pitchers which the state has produced
of late years is on Glenwood’s staff I
and is rounding into his old time
form. Sandy is in the assaying busi- |
ness in Ely, Nevada, and is playing
ball this season to recover from the t
effects of a long sick spell which he I
underwent in the winter. If he is *
in his regular form Grand Junction I
will have to go some to get two out J
of three of the coming series. Ilonska ,
fins never made good' against Grand
Junction but seems to have the fur- ,
ulty of keeping the fullest confl-]
dence of the Glenwood management, j
He has been a top noteber but he!
looks to our bunch from Grand Junc
tion, like a has been. Which one of I
the slab men will be in the box the
two games out of three is not known.
Kirschman, the other half of the bat- i
tery. is another one from the same i
school as Sandusky and he is a good
one. His best asset is pegging bases j
and at tills lie hasn't a superior in
the stall', playing independent ball.
He is also a good stock man and so !
far this season has liit about 2 times j
out of 3 up. Manley, the only local
man playing on their team has up
to this year played behind the bat
and has always made good and his '
playing in field ranks with the aver
(Continued on Page Three.)
WANT NEW TRIAL
FOR DOC POWELL
After Four Hours Jury Renders Ver
dict of Guilty. —Veniremen Dis
missed. 52 Were Called.
MORE TRIALS OF BOOTLEGGERS
An elf on will be made by At
torneys Fry and Welsh, represent
ing 'Doc" Powell, who on last night
was found guilty of selling liquor in
a ‘ dry" town, to get a new trial for
the defendant.
It was 10 o’clock last night when
the jury of 12 men that heard the
evidence hi the cast?brought in their
verdict and found Powell guilty as
charged in the information. The jury
had been out for four hours. During
these four hours many ballots were
taken. It Is reported that the early
ballot show**d an almost equal divis
ion for conviction and acquittal but
finally the verdict of guilty was
agreed to by all of the jurors.
The case went to the jury about 7
o'clock yesterday evening, after eaeh
side had oc<r. pied about 4 5 minutes
in arguments.
This is the first conviction on the
charge of ••bootlegging” secured in
Grand Junction since the town be
came anti-saloon territory.
Powell was accused of selling a
pint, of whiskey to J. W. Shultz, the
man employed by the prosecution to
gather evidence concerning violations
of the anti-gambling and the anti
saloon law.
The attorneys for the defense were
given five days in which to file a
motion for a new trial. In the mean
time sentence is suspended and
(Continued on page seven.)
COMMENCEMENT DAY
SEES TAR AT YALE
[By Associated Press.]
New Haven, Conn.. June 30. —
Commencement day at Yale Univer
sity today was especially honored by
the presence of the chief executive of
the nation, William H. Taft, '7S,
who. following precedent, as a fellow
of the university, donned the robes
as a corporation member and walked
in the procession of several hundred
officers of the university and candi
dates for degrees.
[By Associated Press 1
Cambridge. Mass.. June 30.—The
commencement at Harvard Universi
ty today was a notable occasion.
The candidates for degrees in the
course numbered S50.
Sentinel want ads bring results.
THE DAILY SENTINEL.
—=Exclusive Afternoon Associated Press for the City of Grand Junction
ESTABLISHED 1893.
HELPED SETTLE
GREAT PROBLEM
Jesse Bedwell. Grand Junction Man.
Chosen as One of Adjustors of
Railway Trouble in Mexico.
SEVERAL THOUSANDS INVOLVED
Jesse B. Bedwell. for many years'
a resident of Grand Junction, former- j
ly county clerk and widely known j
here, served as general chairman of j
the committee of adjustment repre- ;
senting the conductors of the nation
al railways of Mexico in bringing
about the settlement or the contro
versv that for 110 days was in force]
In Mexico, resulting in much Hitter ,
ness and attracting attention all over i
I the continent as one of the greatest
railway controversies of recent years,
and which came near tying tip the
I great railway systems of Mexico.
Directly interested were about 500
conductors. 700 engineers and at
j least 300 officials, with their families,
I aggregating not less than 5.000 per
sons.
} Mr. Bedwell has for several years.
|or since leaving Grand Junction about
! four years ago. been employed as a
I conductor on the Mexican Central
j railroad. His popularity among the
i railway men and officials of the Mex
ican republic is proven by the fact
. that lie was selected as one of the
! chief mediators in this great dispute.
The Sentinel today received a copy
of the Mexico Daily Record, the great
publication of Mexico City, in which
1 the termination of the long-drawn
struggle is detailed at great length.
In part, the Record says:
A. Clark, general manager of the
(Continued an page 7.)
YOUNG MEXICAN
ON TRIAL TODAY
Shultz Declares He Bought Whisky
From Valdez in a Chili Parlor. —
Six Men Hear Testimony.
A CONVICTION VERY PROBABLE
This tifternoon in the court of
Justice Sweney (Juan Valdez, a Mex
ican. charged with violating the anti
saloon law by selling a pint of liquor
to J. W. Shultz, was arraigned for
! i rial.
Attorney Welsh represented the
j defendant while the deputy dist rict
‘attorney conducted the prosecution.
A special venire of 12 men was
| summoned and out of this venire a
jury of 0 men was selected after sev
eral had been excused from the jury
I box.
The trial was held in Justice
I Sweney’s office on Colorado avenue,
; as the court room was not available.
The jury secured to try the case
was made up of the following gentle
men: Fred W. ilalbouer, Frank A.
| Lyons. John H. Herron. Mr. lleck,
[ T. J. Vaught and C. 11. Ross.
There were the usual and expected
'controversies between the attorneys
j over the admission of certain cer
tificates from the city clerk showing
the result of the recent city election
ion the "wet” and "dry” question.
\ and over the admission of evidence of
other nature. In nearly all of these
instances the defens** was overruled.
J. \Y. Shultz, the star witness for
: the prosecution in the other cases,
J was the chief witness for the prose
• cution iu this case. He testified to
! the effect that on Lhe afternoon of
[June 10th he went into the chili
! joint operated .by the defendant on
[ South Second street in the rear of the
Royalty Club building, asked the de
fendant If he had any whiskey for
sale, the defendant said that h«* had
whiskey for sale*. Shultz alleges that
he purchased half a pint of whiskey
and paid the Mexican for It, that later
jhe label-d the bottle and turned it
; over to Chief of Police Watson.
I Shultz declared that he bought the
: whiskey to use as evidence against
jthe Mexican and that he was acting
■ under orders from the chief of police,
i He said that he knew that whiskey
1 had been bought there before and for
that reason he went there to make a
purchase
Shultz was severely cross examined
iby Attorney Welsh
L. L. Hoodenpylo, who assisted
{Shultz in getting the evidence in all
of these cases, was with Shultz when
he purchased the liquor from the
Mexican and he corroborated Shultz's
l testimony.
| Chief of Police Watson testified to
I getting the liquor from Shultz after
I the latter had purchased it.
! There was a struggle over the ad
mission of the bottle of liquor as
evidence but it was finally admitted
as such.
Several motions involving the dis
missal of the case werfc'made by the
! defense but were overruled.
When the evidence'for the defense
was called for. Valdez, took the stand
and denied having fcoiti Shultz any
whiskey on June 10, or at any other
(Continued on page 5.)
GRAND JUNCTION, COLORADO, WEDNESDAY. JUNE 30. 1909.
NEARLY 1000
BANKS ARE
INVOLVED
Today Kansas Puts Into Effect the
New Bank Guaranty Law With
Its Many Splendid Features.
MUST PUT UP MILLION DOLLARS
[Special to The Sentinel J
Topeka. Ivans.. June 30. - The bank I
deposit guaranty law passed by thej
last session of the Kansas legislature
goes into effect today.
While the law will affect only such |
banks as elect to comply with It. it. i
is expected that all of the 777 state
j banks in Kansas will place them
| selves under Its provisions without
delay.
Tin* banks under the new law are
to lie partners In a sort of mutual
insurance company. They will have
to put up a million dollars In state
and national securities to guarantee
! the payment of deposits, and the dues
or Insurance premiums will be only
one-twentieth of 1 per cent annually.
Briefly stated, the law provides for
I protection to the following classes of
deposits: Those that do not hear in
terest ; time certificates payable It;
j b*ss than six months from date and
not -extending more than one year,
bearing interest not to exceed 3 per
■ cent per annum and on which inter
i est shall reuse at maturity; savings
i accounts not exceeding In amount
SIOO to any one person and not suh
! jeot to check upon which the bank
has reserved In writing the right to
I require 60 days’ notice of withdraw -
I al. and bearing Interest at not to ex
ceed 3 per cent per annum.
Deposits which are primarily dis
counts or money borrowed by the
bank, and all deposits otherwise se
en red are not guaranteed under the
act.
lust what effect the new law is to
have on the national banks appears
uncertain. The department of Jus
tin* at Washington having decided
that tite national banks could not
| participate in the guarantee feature
! of the Kansas law. the banks them
selves have started a movement to
organize an insurance company
among themselves to insure deposits
in their banks. Eventually, how
ever. it is expected that many of the
national banks, especially those in
the smaller towns, will decide to de
nationalize and become state insti
tutions in order to participate in the
guaranty law.
TONIGHT 10,000 MEN
WILL GO ON STRIKE
[By Associated Press.]
Pittsburg. Pa., June 30.—At mid
night when the **o|»en shop” order of
the American Sheet and Tin Plate
company l»eenmos effective more tliim
in thousand skilled workers, mem
bers of the Amalgamated Association
of Iron and Steel Workers employed
at various places throughout Pen
nsylvania, Ohio, Virginia and Indiana
will quit work. Orders for the re
sumption immediately of several non
union plants which have !>cen idle
for over a year were issued yester
day.
Now is the time to buy lots in Slo
comb s addition. See Milne & Milne.
OVER 7000 MEN TO
GO BACK TO WORK
[By Associated Press.]
+ Winnipeg, Man., June 30. +
■fr After « strike lasting three +
+ months, 7,000 coal miners of +
♦ southern Alberta and southeast- +
+ ern British Columbia voted yea- +
4* rerday to accept the terms of- +
f’ered by the operators. An +
+ agreement will be signed today, +
+ to last for two years. +
++++++++++++++++++
OVER 100 WOMEN ARRESTED
[By Associated Press.]
London, June 30.—The 112 women
who were arrested lust night, after
exciting scenes in the Parliament
square in connection with thirteen
violent attempts on the part of the
militant suffragettes to obtain ac
cess to Premier Asquith by deputa
tion. were brought up In the Bow-
Street police court today.
The charges against the prisoners
are three-fold, namely: obstructing
the police, j assaulting the police and
.willful darpage to property.
WHOLE STATE
WILL BE
DRY
At Midnight Every Saloon in Tennes
see Must Close. —Property Loss j
Will be 10 Million Dollars.
i
;
MEMPHIS THE BIGGEST DRY CITY
[Special to The Sent.ncl.]
Nashville. Tenn., June 30.
{••\Ve'iiiiß of Tenenssee" will awaken
! tomorrow morning to find themselves
j riding on tlt>‘ water wagon. The
state-wide prohibition law passed by
I the legislature last winter oveV the
I veto of Gov. Patterson becomes op
erative at midnight* tonight. The
law forbids th** sale of alcoholic drink
within four miles of a school house,
and will have tin* effect of closing
the doors of virtually every saloon in
the state. All tin* cities will become
"dry among them Memphis, which
will thereby attain tin* distinction of
being the largest city in the world
where the sale of intoxicants is pro
hibited by law. Memphis now lias
KOI) saloons. Other large cities which
will he affected an Nashville, with
131 saloons, and Chattanooga, which
bus 63 drink emporiums.
On January i next, six months af
ter the retailers have received their
knockout blow, the brewers, distillers
and others engaged in the manufac
ture of intoxicants, will be put out of
business. On that date the state law
forbidding the manufacture of in
toxicants will come into force. The
six months’ probation was given the
brewers and distillers to enable them
to dispose of their property.
It is estimated that tin* prohibition
laws will cause a falling off of more
than a million dollars in the revenues
[of Tennessee. Investments exceed
ling $10,000,000 in distilleries, brew
lories, rectifying establishments and
wholesale and retail liquor stores will
become idle indefinitely, and much of
it will be lost, because no indemnity
is provided for. It also is calculated
that 12,000 persons will be thrown
out of employment.
HE CONFESSES AND
TELLS OF THE FIRES
[By Associated Press.]
Chicago, .lum" !ki.—Felix Sharkey,
once a terror to tin* police, but now
crippled and gray, after s|H*nding
last night in jail changed his attitude
today and divulged to Stahs Attorney
W yman all In* knew of a long series
of iMiinh outrage* which mystified
the Chicago police. The strictest se
crecy was enjoined upon the narrator
and officers present at tin* interview.
Arrests are expected.
WORK ON THE LOCKS
[By Associated Press.]
+ Washington. June 30. The +
+ preliminary work has already +
+ begun at Panama on the locks ♦
+ of the isthmian canal +
+*++++++♦+*++++++
TODAY'S METAL MARKET.
[By Associated Press.]
New York, June 3 0. Bead, quiet,
•I. 3 5 <q[) 4.4 5; copper, dull. 1 3 H
13%; silver, 53 %.
AFTER MILLIONS OF
THE STANDARD OIL
[By Associated Press.]
+ Jackson, Miss., June 30. Ap- ♦
♦ plica Cion was made today by ♦
•fr District Attorney for a 4*
+ perpetual injunction restrain*
+ ing the Standard Oil Company +
+ from operating in the state of +
+ Mississippi and seeking to col- +
+ leet it million dollars in penal- +
+ ties for the alleged violation of ♦
+ the anti-trust laws. +
♦+++++++++++++*++
The majority of the women who
had been hailed out after their arrest
arrived at the court armed with "va
lises and lunch baskets in prepara
tion for their expected incarceration
in the Holloway jail.
The magistrate, after hearing the
arguments for and against the ques
tion of the prisoners’ right to pre
sent a petition to the premier, ad
journed all the cases until .July 9.
and the women were released upon
their own recognizance.
50c PER MONTH
SUIT FOR $5000
IS FILED TODAY
City of Grand Junction Made Defend
ant in Action Brought in District
Court by Pioneer Resident.
FOR INJURIES SHE SUSTAINED
This morning in the district court
Miss Celia Wilson, the aged woman
and pioneer citizen whose serious
condition as a result of injuries re- I
ceived in a fail on a sidewalk two {
months ago, was detailed a few days
ago by The Sentinel, filed suit for [
$5,000 damages against the city of.
Grand Junction,
Attorneys Fry & Welsh represent i
the plaintiff.
The plaintiff alleges that on April j
16th, about dusk, she was walking;
toward her home. She was on Ouray j
avenue and at a point in front of the (
residence at 254 Ouray avenue, she I
suddenly stepped into a broken place |
in the board sidewalk and received a j
frightful fall, resulting in serious in- j
juries that have kept her confined to |
her bed for many weeks.
The plaintiff alleges that the side
walk had been in a bad condition for
sonic time and had been neglected by
the city. She states that she did not
know of the broken place in the walk
and had no warning of its presence.
The plaintiff asks that she be
awarded damages to the amount of
$5,000 and that the city pay the
costs of the suit.
The city officials have declined to
pay .Miss Wilson* what she terms as
reasonable damages and as a result
the suit has been filed.
The suit will he tried at the Oc
tober term of the district court.
WEDDING, NOT
DINNER PARTY
In Successful and Novel Manner a
Young Grand Junction Business
Man Surprises His Friends.
BRIDE PRETTY NEBRASKA GIRL
The murriage of Fred W. Coe of j
this city to Miss Hazel (’apron, the ,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Cap
run. prominent of Ord, Neb., was j
probably as great a surprise to the
friends of Mr. Coe and Miss Capron i
in their home town as will be this {
announcement upon the friends of I
Mr. Coe in Grand Junction.
A week or ten days ago Mr. Coe
left for an extended husiness(?) trip
to his old home and other points in j
Nebraska. Before leaving he was ;
closely questioned by the Sentinel re
porter. to whom he gave straightfor- '
ward and unsuspicious replies in each !
and every instance, and was passed
by the same for cause. However,
fresh evidence came to hand a short J
time later and the family of the de- |
fendant was put under n severe 1
cross-questioning, but no admission !
or proof of treason could be discov- l
ored. The conclusion was finally !
reached that there was not sufficient j
evidence to implicate Mr. Coe or to
prove that he had any intentions of
becoming a benedict. The ,ease
against him was dismissed, the state-I
ment being made that his trip to Ne- !
braska was solely from the stand-'
point of business. But a message at j
1 p.m. today made evident the fact
that, if it was merely a business trip,
it was, indeed, a profitable one. and
the young business man had just
completed the most important deal of
his career.
To avoid the suspicions of friends
in the town of Ord. Mr. Coe was met
by an automobile at Leon, a little
station 7 miles this side of Ord. In
vitations were issued to twenty-five
elose friends of the parties concerned
and relatives of Miss (’apron. No
inkling of the nature of the occasion
for which the invitations were issued
was known by even the best friends
and closest relatives outside of the |
immediate family; but they were giv- I
en to suppose that it was to be a din- i
ner party. Of course, due to the clev- !
er manner in which Mr. Coe had been |
spirited into the city, none were 1
aware of his presence.
Promptly at 12 o’clock today, when ,
tite guests were assembled. the
strains of the wedding march were
heard, and Mr. Fred Coe. carrying on 1
his arm his old-time friend and play- I
mate. Miss Hazel (’apron, entered. ]
The minister was there by appoint- !
ment. and the marriage was solem-,
nized almost before the friends had j
recovered from their astonishment j
and realized the fact that a marriage I
was to take place.
After the ceremony the gue.stß
seated themselves at the elaborate
banquet which had been prepared for
the pretended dinner party, and at
1:30 p in. Mr. and Mrs. Fred W. Coe
boarded a train for Colorado.
The couple will spend a few days
at Denver and also at Glenwood. and
will be at, home in this city about
July 8.
(Continued on Page 5.)
MORE LOCAL. STATES
ITI AND TELEGRAPHIC
NEWS PUBLISHED EV
ERY DAY THAN ALL
OTHER PAPERS IN THE
CITY OF GRAND JUNC
- TION COMBINED.
MANY THOUSANDS
WILL PASS
THROUGH
Scores of Special Tr- and Big Par
ties are Cominp -£'.s Way Dar
ing the N j>*Few Weeks,
o*
LIST OF TF SPECIAL TRAINS
o
During <? next few weeks score*
of sp«*/ trains and big excursion
part if* pass through Grand Judc
tioie route either east or wesi
Hu. •** id officials declare that the
tourist travel through Colorado this
summer will break all records.
The National Educational associa
tion in Denver, th** G. A. It. in Sail
Lake City, the Elks convention in
Los Angeles, and many other gath
erings of national importance, held
either in western or eastern cities
will cause thousands of people ta
pass across Colorado.
A number of these special irains
. will stop for brief periods in Grand
i Junction. Others will not stop.
Among the trains and parties to
| pass through Grand Junction at ax
earlv date are the following:
WEST BOUND.
Atlanta. Ca., Epworth Letgne
pary about morning of July 3
McCann Tour de Yonkers Elks.
I night of July 3.
Denver Elks, night of July '
Philadelphia Elks, night of July 6.
i Columbus Elks, night of July X
Southern Illinois Elks, night of
{.July 7.
i Springfield and Central Illinois
i Elks, afternoon of July 7.
Colorado State Elks, afternoon of
I July 8.
Seaboard air line special, morning
of July 9.
i Cotton State Elks, evening July 8-
Allegeheny and Pittsburg Elks
i party, morning of July 10.
| Indiana Elks party, morning of
,July 10.
Boston Elks, night of July 9.
(Continued on page G.)
A BUSY MONTH
FOR CUPID HERE
I
June Marriage Record is Broken. —
Clerk Starr Issues 28 License!
During the Present Month.
ONE FOR NEARLY EVERY DAY
The month of brides and roses eer
; tainly maintained its reputation so
, far as Grand Junction and Mesa coun
ty were concerned this year. Today
I is the last day and those loving
j couples who want to marry in the
i month of June but who have not yet
secured their license must get busy
very rapidly this evening or if
they still insist on marrying in June,
they will have to postpone the happy
event for one year.
I County Clerk Starr and Deputy
i Clerk Steel have issued one license
for nearly every day in th** month,
there arc 30 days in June and up t*»
I this afternoon 28 licenses had bee*
j issued. Messrs. Starr and Steel are
i very hopeful of issuing the 30th li
cense before the day ends.
One or two Grand Junction couple*
that have wed this month secured
their licenses in another county, ai
thotigh the marriage occurred here,
consequently their names are not ref
corded at the clerk’s office.
Clerk Starr states that it has b**en
the biggest marriage license business
for any month of June in the history
of the county as far as he can ascer
tain. Only in one other month, last
December, when Christmas weddings
were so numerous, were more licenses
issued than during the present
month, in the history of the county.
Sir Cupid has been exceedingly
(Continued on page seven.)
CUMMINS SPEAKS
FOR INCOME TAX
[By Associated Press.]
Washington. June 30. - For thn*
hours today Air. Cummins of Iowa. !
speaking in favor of the income tax.
occupied the attention of the senate. ]
large deficits in therl»ET>OINSHR 1
Mr. Cummins asserted that largo
deficits in the finances of the govern
ment are certain to occur every year
hereafter. He declared that every
penny which would result from the
enactment of his and Mr. Hniley’s in
come tax amendment would be neces
sary to meet the demands of the gov
ernment. ,
Father Conway of St Joseph's
Catholic church is still very serious
ly 411 at St. • Mary's hospital .in this -
city.
NO 188

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