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The daily sentinel. [volume] (Grand Junction, Colo.) 1893-current, June 30, 1909, Image 7

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WEDNESDAY JUNE 30. 1909
, I All badn«SS Vegetables
J. Kept out. and
All goodness* fruit
* * Bight no. we are ottering el
’ A most everything grown in the
w ' Buy a case of Strawberries for
0 preserving at a low cash price.
j Cassell’s and Co.
MVTI/AL £/F£/AS. CO. OFM/LWAI/K££ **
IHE DIVIDEND-PAYING COMPANY OF AMERICA. LARGE DIVID
ENDS AND LOW NET COST PROVE THE NORTHWESTERN'S BETTER
_ L. MANAGEMENT.
■w C. S. HORAHAN, District Manager.
Phone Junction 558 1* Building
■ i. i i
fThe Mesa Lumber Co’s
Spring Stock of
PAINTS
Eu Arrived and Specially Good Price* Prevail.
GET OUR PRICES.
Basswood for Pyrography.
Phone Junction 274. • Office and Yard*, 8. 7th St.
Clothing of every description dry
aud steam cleaned. Perfect satisfac
tion guaranteed. Telephone us. we
call for and deliver.—The Suitorium,
125 South Flfth-st.
•It *»* v v *l**'i"*i**l* t
¥ J G CAMPBELL :
f BUILDER AND ARCHITECT f
X PHONE BLACK 3891 f
Estimates and Plans ! i
»t« Furnished. I 4*
t ATTENTION 1 • .
A Are you thinking of building •
JL in town or country? •>
i i can prepare your plans and
A. specifications and give you a .
X proper extimate of cost. • •
*t. Have had 25 years of experl- • .
i ence in building, and can save ..
X you money. • ■
X Call on or address • .
7 R. A. MATTHEWS
X 627 Main Street. ••
Insure with the
Rich, Hutchinson
Realty Company
...Best Companys...
Prompt and careful
attention
533 Main Street
Bond.
Mowers, Garden Hose, Rafrig
era tors at Reduced Prices.
Everything in New and Second-Hand.
Household Goods
t A SPLENDID INVESTMENT, f
.* siiou ‘Located near Randlett, X
X l'intaii county. Utah; on edge X
X r«f i fktah reservation, and is X
T r iose to filed right of way of X
X Moffai railroad. The soil Is a X
T rii t sandy loam, and every acre X
X ran t'C plowed. Two canals are X
X being built that will cover the X
j. land »t a cost of about $5 per X
X acre. The climate is good and X
J, the land is good. This is a X
X snap *r
J I have some other good loca- *J«
Inonb,'or sale. X
X Write for particulars. X
I 0. J BRACKEN, ?
.j. Vernal. Utah.
IS CHOSEN AS
BOARD MEMBER
4* 1. N. Bunting, editor of The 4*
+ Sentinel, was today notified that 4*
4- he had been elected, by a unani- 4-
4* nious vote, by the board of re- 4*
4* gents of the State University at 4*
4* Boulder as a member of the ad 4*
4* vlsory board of the University 4*.
•t* or r-ororano.
4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4* 4-
As neither the nomination nor the
election had been sought by Mr.
Bunting, and as he had no knowl
edgel that he was being considered
for the office, the notification came
as a complete surprise to him.
The election was made at the June
session of the hoard of regents,
which session has just ended.
* Mr. Bunting has not yet determ
ined whether or not lie will accept.
| The notification of IBs election as
a member of tlie advisory board was j
received by Mr. Bunting from Hon.
Ralph Talbot of Denver, a member!
of the board of regents.
Tiie University of Colorado lias
grown during the last decade to |
splendid proportions. It now has a 1
student body in excess of 1,100 young
men and women, supplemented by an
energetic and devoted corps of pro
fessors. instructors and teachers,
some of whom are specialists of na- 1
tional reputation, and all of whom ' '
are laboring untLdnglv to uplift ed-j
ucatlonal standards along practical '
and scholarly lines throughout the I
state.
;
WANT NEW TRIAL !
FOR DOC POWELL
I
(Continued from page «.)
— 1
Powell is out. under bond. i
This afternoon in the court of (
Justice J. P. Sweney, a Mexican ar- <
rested on June 20, is being tried on (
tiie charge of selling liquor to Shultz. <
the agent of the prosecution. The j
Mexican has been in jail since his (
arrest.
All of the gmnbling cases have been (
disposed of. four convictions being ,
secured and five cases being dis- ,
massed by the deputy district at- ]
torney.
There are several bootlegging
cases yet to be tried. I
County Judge Sullivan last night ]
discharged all of the veniremen who .
have been called for the several |
cases. In all f»2 veniremen have \
been summoned for services in these j
trials in the county court. j |
(
ENGINEER SAVES TRAIN.
[Special to The Sentinel.]
San Bernardino. Cal.. June 30. I
The west-bound limited passenger
train on the Salt Lake route, arriving
here yesterday 14 hours late, had a
narrow escape from destruction oil t
a steei> grade near Caliente, Nev..
when the friction burned out a jour
nal on the tender and threw a wheel |
off the axle while the train was run- «
ning 60 miles an hour. The engineer
stopped the train with frantic effort,
but not until it had run more than a •
mile down grude on a high embank
ment. tearing up ties and damaging
the roadbed. (
When you want a nice rig for a !
drive go to Barton & Terrill's, cor
ner of Fifth street and Colorado ave
nue.
Sanit-.ry plumbing commends it
•elf to everybody. See J. E Mc-
Kenzie, the plumber.
THE DAILY SENTINEL. GRAND JUNCTION, COLORADO.
A BUSY MONTH FOR CUPID HERE.
(Continued from page one.)
?
, successful in Grand Junction this T
summer and June of course has been | j
his banner month.
The following is a complete list 1 ;
of the couples to whom licenses were! i
issued here this month: ?
June 1— Wm. McKinley and Della ;
H. Hackett. r
June l - Frank E. Brown and Miss ?
Cecil Taylor. ! •
June l Lee Watkins and Missj $
Maude Ingersoll. | f
June 1 K. W. Purvler and Missj I
Margaret E. Graham. ?
June 2 Harry W. Compton and i i
Aliss Mary H. Walton. ! •
June 3 -Goo. W. Bess Ire ami Miss t
I Ethel Goodale. t
June Ivan P. Goodrich and Miss I
I Phoebe A. Norine.
June 5 (Mias. H. Creek and Miss !
Bertha G. Bailey.
June 9 Harold E. Lutes and Miss T
Edith Kendall. i
j June 10 E. Wilkes Dinwiddle and 1
Miss Margaret Ruhannah Scearce.
June 12—-Roscoe Giffen and Miss
Martha Gigax.
June 12 Kenneth Kay Sloan and
! Miss Berulce 11. Warren. i.
June 12 --Julius Shide and Miss
Anna Mu hr.
| June 14 1C Mitchell and Miss 1
, Nellie Hopple. |
June 16 -Cecil Brown and Missi
Maude Riley.
June 17 H. L. Davis and Miss
Bowman.
June 17 —Morton J. Kinne and
Miss Med ora E. Dresser. j
June in -Hiram A. Brooks and j
| Miss Clarice McAlister.
June 22 J. E. Bl.vnn and Missj j
Alice Clough.
June 2 2 J. E. McKenzie and Miss
| Carrie Edwards. I
j June 23 -Gervais Oscar and Miss
j Antoinette Lament ?
June 25 Laurence O. Manley and ;
! Miss Helen Smith. ?
June 26- lx>n Parson and Miss ?
I I Eva Burckhalter ! I
June 28- Perry A. Carpenter and , •
Miss Pearl Mae Voss. | ?
June 28 E A. Gilligan and Miss ;
I Grace Katt. 1 ?
I June 21* Joseph J. Egger and ?
Miss Mary M. Friedman. j i
June 2!*- Eddie Lalimann and ?
’ Miss Ida Giesselmann. t
June 30 A. E. Baylis and .Miss i
I Brenda Floyd. . |
♦ i I
■ —•— | •
HELPED TO SETTLE I
A GREAT PROBLEM j
T
(Continued from First Page.) ; ♦
J national railways of Mexico, and J.
j B. Bedwell, general chairman of the
1 committee of adjustment represent
| ing the conductors in the merger set - j
I vice, at 12:30 tills afternoon affixed
their signatures to articles of agree
ment finally and amicably settling,
all points of difference which have
been the subjects of discussion for the j
last 110 days. With mutual felici- 1
tat ions among all hands and farewells]
bade in the friendliest spirit, repre
sentatives of the government roads
and its train captains parted shortly
; before 1 o’clock, in definite adjourn
, meut of a protracted joint conference
which has occupied one to four hours
j of almost every working day for near- 1
ly two months.
“Ed P. Curtis, a vice president of
j the Order of Railway Conductors,
with jurisdiction over all the North
American continent as far south as I
the Panama line, will leave for t.h**i
United States via El Paso on this
evening's train.
“As assistant in the consummated ,
settlement Vice President Curtis has
made two trips to Mexico City, hav
ing been called hence on May l to
; Boston, where lie was a delegate at 1
I the national convention of the or-1
:'tier, and having returned to Mexico
I City at once upon the adjournment of
the convention.
“There will he no further business,
|so far as is now known, for the mer
ger conductors' adjustment commit
tee to transact for many months
General Chairman Bedwell is virtual
ly the committee In the absence of
any special matter requiring conven- ;
I tional deliberations.
“Negotiations on any issues'
touched upon in the agreement signed
[today will not bp reopened for two
years, in all likelihood. It is pro
[ vided In one clause of the document i
that upon necessity of arbitration of
any point there shall be filed in writ
ing by either side 30 days' notice to
the other.
“The typewritten contract is a vol
uminous document of 52 articles. Af
ter covering all phases of the inspec -
tion question, which was the primary
cause of difference and the occasion
or concern to the general public, the
closed peace pact goes into the mat
ter of kilometer rates to be paid con- I
due tors. On account of the innumer
able deviations necessary to meet spe
cial and local conditions, this portion
or the treaty is so full of tabulation
that when printed it will look about
like an advertised delinquent tax list.
“The conductors of the former
Mexican Central and National sys
tems sent their two adjustment com
mittees into a Joint conference which
assembled at the German-American
hotel in this city on February 28. By
the middle of March they had merged
into one adjustment committee for
the* combined lines of the amalgamat
ed roads. This committee is com- 1
posed or the following conductors:
J B. Bedwell. chairman: <■'. F. Hun
kins. T. K. Eccleu, <’. F. K Hudson, A.
F. Duval. Z. II Jones. W. P. Shea and
VV.- V. Bunn.”
The Knights of Pythias will be in ,
session this evening.
We are not running a red. green or
blue tag sale, but a bona fide rebate
sale from original plain price tags.
30 per cent rebate on many things;
2 0 pt*r cent rebate on everything.—
T.ie Crown Furniture Co.. 33 4 Main.
The Blue Barn Co. have !
the largest dray wagon in the city ■
for moving household furniture. 319
Colorado-ave. Jhone Junction 228.
Pinoitloc
KRAFT <t EMERSON
|->jTHE FAIR
Summer Shopping on a Very Warm Day---
IS NOT A VERY ATTRACTIVE OCCUPATION—IN SOME STORES. CLOSE. POORLY LIGHTED. POORLY
VENTILATED. STUFFY ROOMS DO NOT ADD TO THE PLEASURE OF ONE S SHOPPING ON THE
CONTRARY. ABUNDANCE OF LIGHT. ABUNDANCE OF FRESH AIR AND GOOD VENTILATION GO
HAND IN HAND WITH ESPECIALLY LITTLE PRICES AT THE FAIR STORE TO MAKE SHOPPING.
EVEN ON A VERY HOT SUMMER DAY. A PLEASURE RATHER THAN A TASK
BUCKLES. —An immense assortment of dainty Belt 10c. 15c. 29c, 45c. is the way they ran At 19c
Buckles and Belt Pins, scarcely any two just there's one lot of extra fine Madras that would
alike. The prices range from 25c; and, although be cheap at 35c. •
there are so many of them from which to choose. TABLE LINENS —for June brides and other brides,
every one is very neat and pretty. Silverware also, and rich Cut Glass, and fine
TORCHON AND CLUNEY LACES.—Right in the China. The gift puzzle—just what shall be the
nick of time wiien there’s a great demand for present to the summer bride —let The Fair Store
them we have a great supply of them at special solve the gift puzzle for you Your money will
price. 5c yard. buy much more than you confidently expected.
EMBROIDERIES.—Some extra special values in LADIES’ READY-TO-WEAR DEPARTMENT—This
Fine Embroideries are being shown just now*. section of The Fair is exceptionally full of special
They are much under price—cost but a trifle — attractions for the summer season —Silk Jumpers,
7c and 12’ -»c a yard They are good stuff to $6.95 —Dresses, worth from $l4 to $25. now
put one’s money into. $9.95 —Petticoats from 45c to $3.45 Children s
RIBBONS. — Bright, fluffy, summery Ribbons, in- Dresses. 25c to $3.45 —Ladies' Waists. 48c to
describably pretty and equally useful. One can- $7.50 —Wash Suits in white and colors, $5 to
not own too many Ribbons; and this summer $14 —House Dresses. $1 to $2.50 Silk Petti
they are cheaper than ever. One special lot at coats. $3.95 to $16 —White Wool Skirts. $7 to
39c the yard is remarkable value. $8.50 —Silk Kimonas. $4.50 to $15 —Silk Waists.
TRIMMED STREET HATS.—Those who have wait- $3 to $7.50—W00l Dress Skills. $6 to sl2—Wash
ed until now without purchasing a Summer Hat Skirts. $1 to $2.50.
may not have acted unwisely, for right at the BASEMENT DEPARTMENT. —It’s a pleasure, so
present there are spread out many of the new- people say, to trade in this portion of The Fail
est and loveliest Trimmed Hats, each one priced so splendidly cool, such splendid ventilation, such
very much less than similar qualities cost earlier ample space, such immense stocks of goods, and
in the season. withal such attractively little prices—it’s no
PARASOLS and Sun Umbrellas —an immense array wonder at all that shopping in The Fair Store
of the very latest patterns in colors or black or Basement Department is a pleasure,
white. They are stronger built than last sea- CLOTHING. —This section is offering its full share
son, but less in weight —cost less and are there- of summer attractions, and, in addition to Cloth
fore very attractive merchandise. ing. Shoes. Underwear. Fancy Vests. Hats. Neck-
WASH GOODS. —This section of The Fair is full of wear and other furnishings are each contributing
special value for the careful shopper just now. their portion of especially bright summer bar-
Plenty of new goods, and all underpriced. sc. gains.
THE FAIR WILL BE CLOSED ALL DAY JULY Sth—EARLY
SHOPPING IS ADVISED.
UP TO 97 WENT
TEMPERATURE
VesU'wlaj' was, with on«* «v\-
reption, lilt* hottest day of flu*
summer in Grand Junetinn and
(lie day excepted (last Friday)
was no hotter hut just as hot.
The highest temperature reeord
»-d yesterday afternoon was 1»7
degrees. The rain promised for
last night or today did not ma
terialize. The weather report
issued today hy Oltserver llard
inge is as follows:
June 2!*. 6 p. m.: Temperature, 93;
relative humidity, 13; direction of
wind, NYW: velocity of wind, 7 miles
an hour: total precipitation during
tiie past 12 hours, trace; state of
weather, clear.
June 30. 6 a. m.: Temperature. 67;
relative humidity. 40; direction of
wind, K velocity of wind. 6 miles
an hour; total precipitation during
the past 12 hours. 0; state of the
weather, clear.
Yesterday tiie maximum temper- \
ature was 97; minimum, 71: mean, 1
84, or 8 degrees warmer than the :
normal temperature for that day.
'Pile forecast for Grand Junction I
and vicinity, issued at Denver, was:
Partly cloudy tonight and Thursday. '
* i
J. II Kankiu is planning on a very 1
extended and delightful trip through
the northwest and along tiie coast. 1
Ho is one of the local delegates to the '
National Irrigation Congress which •
meets In Spokane in early August. j
Men’s sewed soles 85 cents, ladies (
60 cents. Shoe Shop, oppo
site postoffice.
Blame yourself if you don’t get a
pair of lots in Slocomh’s addition. t
SEE RYAN’S
BIG LINE OF UP-TO-DATE
SPRING SHAPES IN HATS
STIEES and STRAW....,
Alfred Benjamin Clothes are World Standard Clothes
E. A. Ryan Company
HE MAKES A STATEMENT.
Grand Junction, Colo.. June 25.
Mr. Hall Harrison, general agent
for Colorado, who is assisting Mr. F.
A. Horn beck, land commissioner of
the Kansas City. Mexico & Orient
railroad, in the sale of Pecos valley
land, has recently made a statement
in our office in regard to everyone
who lias ever considered the lower
Pecos valley either from a standpoint
of an investor, or with the idea of
going there to live.
Mr. Harrison said in part that up
to a short time ago. he had always
been able to say that of the many
men from Colorado whom he hail
taken down to the Pecos valley, only
one man hud returned without in
vesting In the land. Recently he
sold Mr. H. H. Dresser, of Montrose.
Colorado, forty acres, and this sale
now enables him to say that up to the
present time every Colorado man
that has gone down into Texas with
him lias purchased land in the Pecos
valley, Mr. Dresser being the one
man who had previously returned
without buying.
It is only fair to say that when Mr.
Dresser went to Texas, h** intended
going South as far as tiie City of
Mexico, and went through the Pecos
valley simply because he found it
convenient to do so. After returning,
he expressed himself as being much
impressed with some of the land lie
saw in Southern Mexico. He did not
purchase any down there, and when.
Mr. Harrison was in Montrose recent
ly. Mr. Dresser bought forty acres,
of land adjoining that which the men
from Colorado had bought.
We think this statement from Mr.
Harrison of having sold every man .
whom he has taken down from this .
state into the lower Pecos valley will *
be read with a great deal of interest j
by many people in this locality, nad, j
certainly it is a wonderful record. ]
THE H. J. GRAY REALTY CO
337 Main street.
Fine rigs, single or double, at all j
times, at Blue Barn. jj
PAGE SEVEN
WHEN THE FOURTH OF JULY
COMES
You need not buy new wearing
apparel to wear on tiie great holi
day.
Our facilities for dry cleaning
all kinds of ladies' and gentle
men's clothing is exceptionally
good, our work always gives en
tire satisfaction and w*ith few ex
ceptions we make tiie most badly
soiled garments as good as new'.
Delicate fabrics, laces, feathers,
etc., receive the most careful at
tention.
THE UP-TO-DATE
CLEANING & DYE WORKS
Pliooe Jet. 211. 641 Main St.
I M **• Reaches the spot
l/tan/on sss*
KRAFT & EMERSON.
See our »10 *inr<e tirniu.—rr,<
Maatej.

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