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The Lexington record. [volume] (Lexington, Ky.) 1890-1???, January 01, 1891, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069074/1891-01-01/ed-2/seq-1/

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Let your light so shine before men that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father which is in Heaven.
ENTERED AT THE POST-OFFICE AT LEXINGTON AS SECOND-CLASS MATTER.
Vol. I.
LEXINGTON, KY., JANUARY, 1890.
No. 5.
J. STEWART SMITH,
MANUFACTURING
TjlSPENSARY PHARMACIST,
49 E. Short .street. Telephone, 100.
HENSY VOGT,
DEALER IN
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES,
Fruits, Ponltry and Vegetables. Spe
cial attention paid to Coun
try Produce.
Comer Broadway and Short Street,
Telephone 177. Lexington, Ky.
TAYLOR & HAWKINS,
pANCY GOODS AND NOTIONS, .
The Ladies' Favorite Store.
7 W. Main street. Lexington, Ky.
W. PLUNKETT it CO.,
STATIONERS,
JOB PRINTERS,
48 E. MA IN ST., LEXING TON, KY.
Fine Job Printing in all its branches.
JOHN HUTCHISON,
DEALER is
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES,
Pure Kentucky Whiskies, and Im
ported Liquors of all kinds,
warranted pure.
Corner Main and Mill Streets.
Teh-phone No. 4. L EXING TON, K Y-
S BASSETT & SONS,
FINE SHOES OF ALL KINDS
LARGE ASSORTMENT,
. LOW PRICES.
20 EAST MAIN STREET.
C. A. JOHNS,
tin (tad Walnut Slrer
Port Office.
Comer Main and IValmit Streets, itpjmlte
Povt Office.
DBUGGIST,
LEXINGTON,
KY.
MUSIC AND AllT DEALERS.
Call and Examine Our Stock.
THE MIL WARD CO.,
8 & 10 W. Main, Lexington, Ky.
L ICXING TON PL UMIi ING CO.
FINE SANITARY PLUMBING,
Heating by Hot Water Circulation. .
Steam, 1'rass Goods, Drain Pipe.
Lexington, Ky.
C. S. BELL, JR.,
Dealer in
FRU1TS,C0NFECTI()NARIES
Fish, Game, Yeyetablex.
8 and 10 West Short Street.
JOHNS,
PHOTOGRAPHER,
55 East Main Street,
LEXINGTON, - KENTUCKY.
1 The BEST FLOUR is the
CREAM FLOUR,
made by the Lexington Roller
Mills Co., Lexington, Ky. For
sale by all first-class Grocers.
Don't fail to use Cream Flour
it you want good Bread and a
happy Cook.
The Lkxixgtox Record will
be issued the first of every month.
The subscription price is One Dol
lar a year. Advertising space is
Three Dollars per inch for one year,
if paid in advance; or four dollars
when paid by the quarter. Please
address all questions and commu
nications to Lexington Record,
Lock Box 375, Lexington, Ken
tucky. Mrs. Eugenia Ditxlai
Potts, Editor.
Mrs. J. W. McCoxnkll,
Business Manager.
Editorial.
Lexington, already ripe in good
works, needs yet another institu
tion to meet the wants of a grow
ing city. Growth implies pro
gress, yet clean commercial and in
dustrial progress is no more natu
ral than is the untended growth of
the plant free from weeds. So in
our improvements and strides to
wards citydom, there is the usual
influx and increase of poverty and
ignorance in wir midst; "'We- h?"?e
the college for those who will sup
port it, and the free public school
for all who prefer that system.
What we lack is a free Kindergar
ten. Children under eight vears
of age have really no legitimate
place in the regular schools, and
what is to be done for them during
those tender years, in case they
have not the envirpnment of Chris
tian homes ?
The arguments in favor of the
free Kindergarten are not new, yet
they are such as suggest themselves
to every thoughtful parent and
teacher.
The tenements of the poor
swarm with little ones. They are
exposed t every form of evil ox
ample. Miss , a thoroughly
conscientious woman, said to us, "I
was passing along Broadway Sun
day morning, and in the Vine and
Water streets locality, there were
young children uttering' profane
and obscene language, while older
ones were wrangling in boisterous
rudeness and quarreling all that
they could for the tobacco that
was in their mouths." Who that
has walked the streets but has seen
little boys trading in cigarettes, and
larger ones gambling in marbles?
Those who ride in carriages are
spared all ungentle sights and
sounds not inflicted bv their own
darlings under the shelter of home.
What a blessing to gather these
poor untaught babes under One
roof and teach them that there is
a God. Let their young eyes see
the beauty of his love for us, and
their young minds feast upon the
the richness of the knowledge of
wise and pleasant thiDgs, The
Kindergarten system imparts in
struction with every toy-like uten
sil used. The string instead of
idly building Jacob's ladder, or I
the crow's foot, is made to show
the pulley principle. The blocks
which build such pretty houses in
the nursery, are here used to form
geometris figures. Germs of in
vention are planted with each joy
ous laugh of triumphant building,
and the destructive bump in the
little cranium is smoothed into a
spirit of laudable investigation.
The songs make light the heart
which has no other wellspring of
pleasure. More than all, the clean
liness, the refinement, the personal
graces of a cultured teacher, in
fuse new ideas and ambitions.
What though the child return to
his "wallowing in the mire," be
tween whiles. This one bright bit
of sunshine with which his day
begins, will linger through all the
intermediate gloom.
Should active steps be taken to
establish a free Kindergarten in
Lexington. We trust that our
readers wilJLauie encouragement to
"to the enterprise. The question is
even now
midst.
being mooted in
cur
A II XT JEiX'N LETTER.
Bright Prospects Good Wishes
Comfortable Pensioners.
A merry Christmas and a
happy New Year to all !
I have euch a pleasant letter
for you, dear friends, this time.
Death has mercifully ended the
sufferings of those whose story
has saddened these pages. Their
Christmas tide was celebrated
with rejoicings far above our
feeble strivings alter happiness.
The Infirmary is growing every j
day in virtues, in advantages and
in strides towards the goal for
which it started one year ago. It
is filling with private patients and
increasing in nurses. Miss Mary
E. Haley, of Georgetown, is the
new housekeeper. A friend has
sent you a full notice of the insti
tution from her standpoint of a
discharged patient, well and
happy. It appears elsewhere in
this issue and will give you a fair
idea of this haven of rest and
comfort. There have been a
number of successful surgical ope
rations since my last. There are
no cases ill unto death so far as
we know. The interesting charity
patients whom I have introduced
to you, have all gone home, and
with those who pay board the Re
cord has nothing to do save to
wish them all the health and
strength they need. The new
annex is assuming full grown pro
portions and will be ready for in
mates ere the spring opens.
In February before the begin
ning of Lent the Managers will
give a Charity Ball at the Opera
House for money to go towards
paying for this building. Mr,
Joseph Rich, the railroad man
who was brought here almost
dead from typhoid fever and
went away well after weeks of
nursing, has written Miss Jen
kins from the South a warm letter
of friendship and gratitude. He
says he is a consistent member of
the Methodist Church and can
never forget the Protes'ant In
firmary. The Home of the Friendless
looked unusually tidy and pros
perous at my last visit. The
flowers had all hidden their heads,
but the good people did not seem
to miss them. Mother Steele sat
resting from her early morning
work of sewing carpet rags. She
lifted her sightless eyes and
smiled her welcome. Just across
in her rocking chair Aunt Patsy
w$ cuttings way. A iUieffeet-
were the piles of rags trom which
she made her balls. I said, "I
am glad to see you so well again,
Aunt Patsy, you have had such
a serious illness." But she would
not allow that she was well. It
is her harmless little whim not to
be well. I told her I expected to
see another new carpet soon, and
that' I should expect her to make
for me a rug of silk pieces.
Mother Cronleigh still nurses
her lame foot. She is harmless
and amiable, quite a favorite of
Matron Mary. One of the old
ladies was out for a walk. The
kitchen in the basement has
been deserted for the warmer
one upstairs. Here Mother
Morris was cooking dinner Just
out on the brick walk stood Aunt
Amy with her pets, for now Dick
has a plump pullet named Biddie
for a companion, and Flip, a
happy little dog shares the affec
tions of the mistress. Dick is
very jealous of Flip and chatters
about it like the knowing chicken
he is I promised to take him
some corn, now that the season
for roasting-ears is past, aud he
gave a loud crow and trotted off
eyeing me sideways to see if I '
really meant it. The delight of '
Aunt Amy atjsuch "showing oft"
on the part of her favorite was
worth going to see. A happy
family was this, and it loses
nothing by going into the lower
grade of creation for companion
ship. I cannot tell you more this
time. Your loving friend,
Ar.vr Jeax.
IS

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