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The Lexington record. [volume] (Lexington, Ky.) 1890-1???, March 01, 1891, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069074/1891-03-01/ed-1/seq-1/

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Til L1IIITOT ElOOED
Let your light so shine before men that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father which is in Heaven.
ENTERED A T THE POST-OFFICE A T LEX IN G TON AS SECOND-CLASS MA TTER.
Vol. I.
LEXINGTON, KY., MARCH, 1891.
No. 7.
J. STEWART SMITH,
MANUFACTURING
JJI8PENSARY PHARMACfST,
49 E. Short street.
Telephone, 160.
HENRY VOGT,
DEALER IN
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES,
Fruits, Ponltry and Vegetables. Spe
cial attention paid to Coun
try Produce.
Corner Broadway mnd Sliort Street,
Telephone 177. Lexington, Ky.
TAYLOR A HAWKINS,
pANCY GOODS AND NOTIONS,
Tna Ladies' Favoritk Stork.
7 W. Main street. Lexington, Ky.
W. PLUNKETT & CO.,
STATIONERS,
JOB PRINTEtlS,
43 E. MAIN ST., LEXINO TON, KY.
Fine Job Printing in all its branches.
JOHN HUTCHISON,
DEALER IX
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES,
Pure Kentucky Whiskies, and Im
ported Liquors of all kinds,
warranted pure.
Corner Main and Mill Streets.
Telephone No. 4. LEXINO TON, KY.
S. BASSETT & SONS,
FINE SHOES OF ALL KINDS
LARGE ASSORTMENT,
LOW PRICES.
30 EAST MAIN STREET.
C. A. JOHNS,""""
Corner Main and Walnut Streets, oppotUe
rost Vtfice.
DBUGGIST,
LEXINGTON, . - - '- KY.
M USIG AND ART DEALERS.
Call and Examine Our St6ck.
THE MIL WARD CO.,
8 & 10 W. Main, Lexington, Ky.
LEXINGTON PLUMBING CO.
FINE 8ANITARY PLUMBING,
Heating by Hot Water Circulation.
Steam, Brass Goods, Drain Pipe.
Lexington, Ky.
C. S. BELL, JR.,
Dealer in
FRUITS.CONFEOTIONARIES
Fish, Game, Vegetables.
8 and 10 West Short Street.
JOHNS,
PHOTOGRAPHER,
55 East Main Street,
LEXINGTON, - KENTUCKY.
The BEST FLOUR is the
CREAM FLOUR,
mado by the Lexington Roller
Mills Co., Lexington, Ky. For
sale by all first-class Grocers.
Don't fail to use Cream Flour
it you want good Bread and a
happy Cook.
The Lexington Record will
be issued the first of every month.
The subscription price is One Dol
lar a year. Advertising ppace is
Three Dollars per inch for one year,
if paid in advance; or four dollars
when paid by the quarter. Please
address all questions and commu
nications to Lexington Record,
185 S. Mill St., Lexington, Ken
tucky. Mrs. Eugenia Dunlap
Potts, Editor.
Mrs. J. W. McConnell,
Business Manager.
There is no doubt that selfish
ness, as well as self-preservation,
predominates in the human crea
ture. The best of us are selfish
many of us unconsciously so.
Even in our ways of doing good
comes the trail of the serpent.
There is one class of bread-winners
who suffer greatly at our
hands, and this comprises the
shop-women, or sales ladies, as
they are termed. A few hints tor
ourselves and others may result
in mutual improvement at this
Lenten season, when all hearts
should soften at the thought of
unnecessary y.flerirjg;,Kwhe' Jr-e
should lighten the burdens and
help others to live.
. Ask in a pleasant way for what
you want, and state distinctly
what you mean. Do not, as Jrs.
X. did, go in a shop and say, "I
want some trimmings," as if the
girl behind, the counter were a.
mind reader.
Unless you really do not want
to buy, it is hardly fair to have
the tired arms tumble down piece
after piece till the counter is piled
mountain high. The girl is paid
to get tired. Oh, yes; but if it
were your own girl,- would you
not have mercy?
Sometimes you are in good
faith yet fail to be pleased with
the stock. All right. These
hints are not for legitimate con
tingencies. Have a care for even the feel
ings of a shop girl. Perhaps you
have not seen the flush mount
and the quick tear start as you
vented a cross humor upon some
mother's only dependence her
darling. And if of sterner stuff
and she, too, shows temper, how
unpardonable in her the sin you
would pet and foster.
Do not say you can get the
goods cheaper elsewhere. If you
can, go there. Of all the unwel
come customers the one who
"Jews" is an eyesore.
Clerks are human beings, often
nervous and tired till the smile
they would call up for your ben
efit is but a sickly distortion. You
know not of that restless night,
that sick husband, or fretful
babe, or private grief. Y ou do
not realize that a day oft means
docked wages, for business knows
no mercy; and dollars and cents
have no sympathy. The clerk
must stand to his post, else those
pushing from behind may crowd
into his place. Nothing is easier
than to supply vacancies.
There is too much shopping
done from carriage windows.
Avoid calling out the busy clerks,
but go inside, or send some friend
who will serve you.
Do your shopping before five
o'clock, especially in warm
weather. True, the nap at home
in your cool corner is hardly go
ing before that hour, and then
you must have your breezy drive,
fetching up at six o'clock to buy
something. This is just right for
you; but how about the pale book
keeper back in her little dark,
hot pen, obliged to wait till you
are gone to record the charges, or
the cash, for both must go down?
How about the clerks who, hav-0ne of the most beautiful women
ing stood idle since dinner, must 0f her day, but was ever active in
now fold up and put away and good work. She was one of the
cover with dust spreads every founders of the Orphans' Home,
counter in the store,, when the In honorof her virtues hereon has
hOuf Karcome toclose doors 'ahdaEiisheoTa 'free Kindergarten at
go home. (the Industrial School building on
Our readers are all devoted to
good words and works. Do not,
then, forget the bloodless battles
that are daily and .hourly fought
behind the counters.
Please pay the $1 you owe for
The Record.
A Friend.
Miss Nannie Smith, of Fair-
lawn, kindly donated five dollars
to The itecorcl. It takes money
to. run it, and every little helps.
The Main Street Church.
The growth of the Main Street
Christian church seems almost
phenomenal. There is scarcely a
Sunday service when one or more
does not take membership there.
either by letter or confession
The exact number since New
Year1 Day has not been fur
nished us.
Our IJuslneaa Manager.
Mrs. J, W. McConnell writes
from Memphis that her health is
better. She does not know; per
haps, how her friends miss her
and long for her return. The
Record thus,' answers the many
questions concerning her.
The Record and the Ladies'
Home Journal only $1.75
TheMarj Cecil Kindergarten.
Mr. Howard Gratz, editor of the
"Lexington Gazette, has established
two monuments to the memory of
his parents, which are far better
than bronze or marble. To die is
sad; to be forgotten, sadder still;
and nothing so perpetuates the
recollection of good men and
women as that which calls for the
continuance of their good deeds at
the hands of worthy successors.
Gratz Park has won its higk
reputation as a pleasure ground.
Here when the present owner wa
a lad, he played, with a hundred
others, while the mother enjoyed
their sport. And taking a few
lessons in surgery from Dr. Dudley,
that mother was wont to bind up
the cut fingers, gashed heads and
sprained ankles of the headlong
clan. When apples were ripe on
the farm, she had bushels of them
gathered and brought to the park,
where they were strewed over the
graSs, more than enough for even
those greedy youngsters.
Mary Cecil Gratz was not only
N. Upper Street. He employs as
teacher, Miss Mary Hamilton,
whose worth and ability are well
known in the community. The
children who gather there are fast
learning something besides squalor
and misery. Realizing that the
only path to the young animal's
affections is through its 6tomach,
their benefactor gives them a stick
of candy every morning. This
ensures a sweet beginning, and the
rest is easy. A charity so nobV
deserves and will doubtless obtain,
recognition for generations to come.
Mrs. M. P. Lancaster.
This generous patron of good
work breathed her last on the
night of the 24th inst. and was
laid to rest on the 26th inst. with
appropriate ceremonies. In her
the poor had a friend, and while
she lay nearing the end of her
pilgrimage, the old ladies at the
Home of the Friendless, which
had long known her influence
kept eagerly asking, "How is
she?" Truly there is one touch
of nature which makes the whole
world kin.
Mr. M. A. Cassidy, one of onr subscri
bers, is laboring to establish libraries in
the city sohoo's. of which he is Superin
tendent. The plan is to have each child
bring one book, and when gathered ia
catalogues will be made and officers ap-
Coin ted. Prof, Kichards. of Chicago,
ejjan a course of lectures for this
object on the 3rd o! February,
r

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