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Evening bulletin. (Maysville [Ky.]) 1882-1883, August 08, 1882, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069125/1882-08-08/ed-1/seq-1/

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T Tit
T;lJ.tJRirEY,
Plumber, Gas and Steam Fitter
dealer in Bath Tubs,. Hydrant Pumps, Iron
aud Lead Pipe, Globe, Angle and Check Valves,
Itubber Hose Tin d Sewer Pipe. All work, warranted
and done when promised. Second street,
tfoppoaife;' White &:th't's. aP;i
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.& z Eta'tel4blieaa:eS5. '
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GliWfiEKY
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. WT GfEiSBLi
KrorsrWrSeCttMifSt., Opp. OperalHreHNe,
rflE"M' I25&S? y lAW.ggagscara
i ounpairom
r
ffflMCW
sa nstuse ritiki
Mil m m
4000Ttards Lawn, choice styles and fast colors
at 5 cents per yard. SCO yards India Linen
at 10 cents per yard. 240 pairs regular made
men's half hose at 10 cents per pair. Other
goods proportionately low.
BDBOBMMOLIN.
Jul, .!
X. LOWRY,
DEALER IN
STAPLE AND FANCY
GROCERIES,
Teas, Tobacco, Cigars, Queensware, Wooden-ware,
Glassware, Notions, Ac. Highest price
paid for Country Produce. Goods delivered to
any part of the oity.
CorY Fourth andi Plunu Streets,
T
" C-.
apiaiyd
MAYSVILLE. KY.
J. R. SOUSLEY,
AfciecfcinlfaetoriidJuilder.
p
T7STIMATES'.furnis)eV3 ah'd
- a
T
i R
n rom tl vjin l)ch
shell for allworVTrivdur,'HVifi.
ThicdtrpUi.ear Wfll)i Jiwy qHe Ky.
Four Dbiffl' Be"t6tli6PJt6fflc'?cPXto'x,(l',:t
L 'XWQKITI
MVfl -&&&&&'&
ice
4on
tlce.
$&mw?simm&:! u
my29
Contractors and Builders,
i
a
jlj ranteq. on Fourth Street between
'imdlrilaglone.
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i 4
all
juiai:'4'0mdaw
? "'7 , '
- jn sun tVl
lop on
fJfim
I9
QPPi' Central Hote
ce Open aVall Heurs: WjiCATVI&Er JFY.
mayiaiy.u.
A Brute or a Man?
As we breed and rear sheep and oxen
that the materials of their bodies may
serve our uses, so we breed horses for
the sake of their mechanical "energy ;"
and we consider ourselves justified in
getting out of them as much work as
they can be made to do without severe
physical suffering to themselves, in repayment
for the feeding, housing, and
general care we bestow upon them. But
are the horses consenting parties to this
arrangement ? What should we say if a
conquering nation were to use us as
beasts of draught or burden? Should
we not raise the cry, "Am I not a man
and a brother ? Have you a right to
treat me like a brute, beast?" Clearly,
then, the common sense of mankind
claims in virtue, not of superior strength,
but the higher elevation in the soale of
being to make the horse labor for man's
use, allowing him to return only the
right of kindly treatment at our
hands. But it is not a matter of everyday
experience that our occasions require
some extraordinary exertion, such
as the horse can be only iuduced to put
forth by the application of whip or
spur or, to put it in plain terms, by the
inflicting of pain? If an
puts himself into a cab, on his
way to denounce atrocities of " doctors
at a public meeting, and finds that the
continuance of the jog-trot pace at
which he is going rill cause him to miss
his appointment, does he hesitate to tell
the driver to urge on his horse knowing
well what his speed involves ? Or, if he
had the misfortune to be dangerously injured
by a railway collision in a place far
removed from medical assistance, aud
were lying in bodily and mental agony,
counting the minutes until relief could
arrive, would ne be content to wait tne
good pleasure of the horse whose rider
goes off in search of a doctor, or of that
on which the doctor comes to his rescue ?
Would he not feel that all that the horses
can do must be got out of them by the free
use of whip and spur V the limited and
temporary suffering inrl.cted on the
lower creature being quite justifiable in
view of the greater (because permanent
aud benefit conferred on
the higher involving, it may be, the
future welfare of others dearer to him
than his own life. Let me put one more-case
for my opponent's consideration,
which, whether it did or did not really
occur, may be accepted as a "crucial
instance." A man, condemned to death
for a crime he had not committed, is
brought out for execution, and the noose
is already round his neck. A rider is
seen in the distance urging toward the
scaffold a horse covered" with foam, aud
obviously ready to drop with fatigue ; he
waves something in his hand with a
deprecating gesture, the execution is
stayed ; the crowd opens to let the horse
reach the scaffold ; the rider presents
the reprieve which had been obtained at
the last moment by the production of
unexpected evidence of the prisoner's
innocence, and tne horse drops down
dead. Who shall condemn the use of
whip and spur, even to this extreme, for
the Bake of preserving the life of an innocent
man, w ith all its possibilities of
future happiness and usefulness ? The
may talk about his
unwi'lingness to profit by sufferings inflicted
upon innocent brutes ; 'but will
gny one say that he had rather have, been
hqngd that vthe horsa should have
suffered to aave him ! Or, if, lie dares
Bay it would any one but a Zoophilist believe
him ? Dr. Carpenter in , Fortnightly
JRoview.
md " Stating of them
Slat Journal
- ytfirm -
EVENING BULLETIN.
" HEW TO THE LINE, LET THE CHIPS FALL WHERE THEY MAY."
. cj f :
VOLUME 1. MAYSVILLE, TUESDAY EVENING, AUGUST 8, 1882. NUMBER 221.
TRAIN ARRANGEMENTS.
During the Camp Meeting at Park's Hill, round trip tickets
will be sold at Half Rates and Special Trains will be run as follows
:
Leave Maysville 5:45 a. m. 8:15 a. m.
Arrive Oainp Grounds 7:15 a. m. 9:45 a. in.
Leave Paris,...' 6:30 a. m
Returning, leave Camp Grounds for Maysville, 5;30 p. m. and
7:15 p. m. For Paris, 5:30 p. m.
The schedule on Sunday, the 6th inst., is as follows :
Special Trains will leave Maysville ... ;...-. .-..8,30 a. m.
" " Lexington t :..... v.. :&30 a.m.
t L" - cl. Falmouth 6:45 a.m.
Returning, leave Camp Grounds for Maysville, 4:00 p. m. For
Lexington, 4:00 p, m. For Falmouth, 4:00 p. m.
The schedule on Sunday, the 13th inst., is as follows :
Special" Train leaves Maysville :.. ....-.. 8:30a. m.
" " Covington ;....; 7:30
" " Lexington 8:30 a. in.
All Trains returning leave Camp Grounds at 4:00 p. m. sharp.
NOTICE.
acconut of my continued ill Health, 1
ON
have couclmleu, as soqu 'as practicable, .to
retire from the dry goods trade, 1 now offer my
entire stock lor sale to any mei chant wishing
to engage in the business, and will rrom tiie
ist day oi July sell my goods FOR CASH, until
disposed of, which will enable me to oiler to
the retail trade some special bargains.
All persons knowing themselves indebted to
me will please call and settle at once, as I am
anxious to square my books. Respectfully,
apllldly H. ii. BMOOT.
AGENTS FOK
BUIST'S GardenSeed
A fresh supply just received.
3STO OLD JSDEIEID,
Allj,this year's purchase. Call and get a catalogue.
WALL PAPER
. AND
WINDOW SHADES
Every style and pattern, as cheap as the cheapest.
Give us a call and examine our stock.
ap211y J.U.PECOR&CO.
P. S. MYERS,
Dealer in
Groceries, Hats and Caps
Roots aud Shoes, Q,ueensware and Hardware.
Highest cash price-paid for Grain and Country
Produce. . jyl5d .Mt. OLIVET.
JOHNWHEELEE
Headquarters for all kinds oi Confectionery
Fruits, Canned Goods, etc.
Fresh Stock and Low Prices.
Come and see me if you want to save money.
F. L..TRASYSER,
PIANO KATTOFACTTSIEH
From t 4 Ioorn; uest of Jjiii Houae
Grand, Upright and Square Pianos, also the
best make of Organs at lowest manufacturers'
prices ; Tuning and Repairing. nl.7
THE LATEST. SENSATION.
Poe, the Poet, Murdered.
Dr. J. J. IVIoran, of Falls Church, Ya.,
in a lecture upon the death of Poe, said :
As the shades of evening descended
upon Baltimore, Poe had r.imbled on until
he had reached a dangerous portion
of the town, where it was unsafe for a
man to loiter alone. Here the men who
had been following came up with him
and he was forced into a low den, where
he was drugged, robed, stripped of his
apparel and then clothed in the filthy
rags of one of the brutes who had assaulted
him. From this place he was
thrust into the street, and as he staggered
along, his brain benumbed by the deadly
drug, he fell over an obstacle in his
pathway and lay insensible for hours
exposed to the cutting October air. A1
gentleman passing recognized the faca
of Poe as he lay prone upon the street,
and calling a hack he directed that he be
conveyed to the Washington Hosjntal,
sending his card to Dr. Moran, with the
single word "Poe" written in the corner.
Poe was cared for, and received
energetic medical treatment to counteract
the effect of his depressed condition.
During this time Dr. Moran said to him :
" How do you feel, Mr. Poe ?"
"Miserable."
"Do you suffer any pain ?"
"No."
" How long have you been sick ?"
"I cannot say."
As Poe's last hours approached Dr.
Moran said that he bent over him and
asked if he had any word he wished
communicated to his friends. Poe raised
his fadinff eyes and answered, "Nevermore."
In a few moments he turned
uneasily and moanecl : " O G$d, is there
no ransom for the deathless spirit?"
Continuing, he said : "-He who rode
the heavens and upholds the universe
has His decrees written on the frontlet
of every humnn being." Then followed
murmuring, growing fainter ai.d fainter,
then a tremor of the limbs, a 1. int sigh,
and the spirit'of Edgar Allen Poe had
passed the boundary line that divides
timefiom eternity. Washhtcjion Post,
The g:od die young. The bad live to
lie about the weather and are spoken of
as the oldest inhabitants. Picayune.
In the Black Forest.
Fringes of pines displayed themselves
in the immediate neighborhood, each one
distinct and detached from the other;
but beyond, and far away as the eye
could follow, the black mountains accumulated
in dense dark musses aud outlines.
Stretches of velvety fields and
slopes here and there relieved the gloom.
White roads twisted snake-like, about
the vast scene. To the right stretched
great uninteresting plains, the flowing
Khine, a conspicuous object, but here
not more romantic thau the tamest
rivers, in the distance rose the long
chain of the Vosges Mountains, with
their soft, wavy, graceful undulations,
though too far off to be very conspicuous
or interesting. .Small streams ran their
course and villages dotted the plain,
their red roofs rising in contrast with
the Bomber pines. The wind swept
great white clouds across the sky, bringing
put the blue beyond in deep relief,
while they qast huge shadows upon the
plain,that chased each other apd dissolved
as the clouds died out in sjmce. One
tree, on& stream, one field, one hill, may
resemble another, but a thousand times
.multiplied,, and thousand tines geen,
xne jasj pox is, m jreen ,ana, .pgautrf ul to
the mind, m invigorating to the. BpMjaa
the first. The only sad Boot -war 'the
w7!VP?ra
Inibiuftiory.

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