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The Richmond climax. (Richmond, Ky.) 1897-1914, October 03, 1913, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069162/1913-10-03/ed-1/seq-2/

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l u tt i 1 1 J unit nil uiu,wiaim. I -
i ' - I
i
I The Showing
when covered with our beautiful 5ilk Gloves
becomes a matter of proper pride. - Lvery
lady who makes any pretense to style will
have at least two pair of these
Fine Summer Gloves
elegant, cool and comfortable. They are by
no means expensive. Fancy stitched and
strongly made throughout ome in and try
on a pair. They will tempt you
McKEES
The Richmond Climax.
PsMibe4 lvery me4y mad tridr AftaraM
TflECLIMAX PRINTING CO
(Incorporated.)
K. S. Milter, Pre W. C. White. Sec I frees.
W. P. WALTON....: ...Editor
B. D. GORDON Business Manager
PRICE fl.'0 A YEAR IN ADVANCE
OCTOBER 3, 1913
DEMOCRATIC NOMINEES
COUNTY TICKET
For Representative
J. F. WHITE
For County Judge
W. R. SHACKELFORD
For County Attorney
R. H. CROOKE
For County Clerk
R. B. TERRILL
For Sheriff
V. B. BENTON
For Jailer
MORGAN TAYLOR
For Assessor
P. S. WHITLOCK
For School Superintendent
H. H. BROCK
CITY TICKET
For Mayor
SAMUEL RICE
For City Attorney
D. M. CHENAULT
For Police Judge
J. D. DYKES
For Chief of Police "
D. F. POWERS
For Councilmen
T. T. COVINGTON
ROBERT GOLDEN
W. T. VAUGHN
EMIL LOHRISCH
T. S. TODD
S. A. DEATHERAGE
NO COMPROMISE WITH CRIME
While everybody beems pleased that
the case of the Winchester banker, jail
ed for contempt, has been settled, law
yers say that they do not see how
Judge Benton could disregard the plain
letter of the law and not bar the self-
confessed vote buyers, reported by Mr.
Ilamptor, from holding office or voting.
OUU NEW DREE.S GooDJ, MATERIALS OF ALL
KIND.S, AND EVERYTHING THAT AN UP-TO-
DATE DRY COODJ DEPARTMENT -SHOULD CAR
RY, YOU WILL FIND NOW ON DISPLAY AT OUR
-STORE. WE INVITE THO.SE WHO ARE DIS
CRIMINATING IN THEIR DRE-5J To LOOK AT -OUR
MERCHANDISE FOR THIS SEASON. WE
ARE CAREFUL IN SELECTING TRIMMINGS To
MATCH THE APPROPRIATE SHADES FoR THE
SEASON. BUY YOUR SEASON'S NEEDS FROM
US AND KNOW THAT THEY WILL BE CORRECT
IN SHADE, STYLE AND MATERIAL, AND THAT
THE PRICE WILL NOT BE AS HIGH AS THE
QUALITY
John R. Gibson & Co.
of Hands
Chapter 41, Section 15S7 of the Revis
ed Statutes of Kentucky, says that who
ever shall bribe another shall on convic
tion be fined from tM to 1100 and im
prisonment from 10 to 90 days, or both
fined and imprisoned, and shall be ex
cluded from office and suffrage. The
conjunction which connects the tine or
imprisonment with the exclusion from
office holding and suffrage is copulative
and not disjunctive, thereby leaving, as
they say, no power in the judge to cit
out that provision. We suppose, iiow-
ever, that Judge Benton knows what be
is ab:ut, but if the contention is as our
lawyer friends claim, he has set a pre
cedent it will be hard for him to get by,
even if he did it because it was the first
offense of the accused. It seems that
the full peaalty should have been inflict
ed on the self-confessed bribers and then
the victory of the law would be much
more complete. At any rate the trage
dy has too much of a farce-comedy end'
ing to p'ease the audience. Had it been
different, there would probably have
been no additional case to deal with for
contempt as has appeared. Thereshould
be no Compromise with crime
e do not want to detract an iota
from the good work Judge Benton is do
ing, but we do not want to see him make
the mistake of erring on the side of
mercy, when the law is mandatory in its
provisions. The Governor alone should
pardon.
Major Ucssell, of the U. S. Medical
Corps, tells in Journal of the American
Medical Association of the wonderful re
sults that have been accomplished by
vaccination for typhoid fever. lie says
that In 1902 with an enlisted strength of
80,7.8 officers and men, there were 5G5
cases of typhoid fever resulting fatally.
In 1909 out of 81,075 men there were 382
fatal cases. In March of that year vac
cinalioo was begun, but in too small an
extent to affect the ratio. In 1910 over
16,000 were vaccinated and the number
of typhoid cases began rapidly to dimin
minish till 1911 there were only 70 cases.
In that year vaccination for typhoid was
made compulsory on all persons in the
military service "and on all recruits. In
1912, the first year in which the entire
army was sought to be made immunr
o ily 27 cases occurred, the last one on
RESOLVED
THAT WHEN YOU
WANT ATHINCJ
IN A HUR.RY
PHONE US-
we Ve Got the
GOODS.-
Dee. 19 last year. Since that lime there
hasn't been a single case of typhoid In
the army . Major Kussell states that in
the past four years 230,000 persons bare
been vaccinated without a single death
or injurious result. .
With this knowledge before them, it
will be a greater disgrace than ever for
any one to tlie of typhoid fever. A never
failing remedy has been found and suf
fering humanity can be relieved of one I
of its greatest ills, "which cuts duwn to I
many people annually. ,
The end is at iasi in sight. The pres
ent Conrrtssjiiet in extra session April
7. ExV'i t 'or the special session of the
10il Cui res, Uej, inning Murclt I. 1307,
and end ing Dec 2 following, the exist-
i:ic body lias air. aJv made a record. It!
is also nolcwort! y t'nat uitli the excep-
iioj cf the Wilsva tioruati larilT, the I
pending tariff bill has been under con
s' Jerulit n ioi'jrer than any other meas-
u-euf the kind tince the Civil War. The
Mill niov bill, iu'roduced Arril 10. '90.
as i ;isse I Se: t. :;0. Tiie Wibon-Gor-
ma:i bill, iiitroJuccJ at a regular session
Dec 13, '.3, b-c-.aie a la Ati,'. 13, '04.
Tiie DinjVv 1 i'.', i trvKi ej M ircll 15,
wiifc d::oiel o.'July 21. Tue Payne
AMrc'i hi'! v.HsdikCc-se'.! from Mircli
j, J u:r .1 A i. if. it. i.asl n it tit the'
!.'.e ; ssed :.se to .e -sace report n
he Dell. ''
Ulc Tar :f I!i I Z'i 10 11. The
liie:;sJ;e U
bit t- ti .a House todav
u i ev;
..-111 t :
:vd l j Le s ';.:' J 'oy ike I'rei
jiV. .V J ti,e Co:;summ;i
:on o: :i 1
tit--!- . : e A w:. I have teen
accva.t - :.
'.. C .ies has devoted
jr.;e s t mo
t-have li.le
t us to t ;.i l'i I. but ll couid
reJ to a bc:t;er purpose.
Via .ik Vt ) Ideuce,
lie eii.l is now in
As chairman of the Committee on the
District of Columbia, Congressman Ben
Johnson is practically Governor of the
District, and lie is saving tue country a
treat deal of monev. which was former-1
Iv extra va-anllv soant Ha has beett
i extravagantly spent, tie has been
threatened and criticised, but he keeps I
on at it. Recently he assailed the offl-
cial conduct of the corporation counsel of
the District in a speech in Congress and
yesterday the head of it resigned, show
ing that Mr. Johnson's investigation of
the office lias struck pay dirt. There
must be something very crooked when
man will resign a t5,500 office under
such heavy fire.
A Missouri judge has decided that a
wife has the right to use a broomstick
on an offending husband. This decision
has been somewhat offset by an Ohio I
judge, who holds that husbands have a
right to He to their wives. If both de-1
i
cisions are good law. erring husbands I
, . , .
can save themselves the punishment un-
der the one by invoking the privilege of
the oilier. Ia other words, they can lie
, , i
themselves from contact with woman s I
time-honored weapon
EditorT. Sasders Orb has bought
ine controlling interest in me uarroas-
burg Leader of F. P. James and is now
in full control and making a good paper
of it. It was formerly the Democrat,
then the Republican and Mr. Orr chang
ed the name to the one it now goes by
and made it an exponent of CoL Roose
velt's principles. The same 'type has,
therefore, been made to urge the claims
of three parlies.
Tub Louisville papers make a great
b'o over the fact that Preacher E. L.
Powell will support the Democratio
ticket, as he does not like the Progres -
sive party's management against fusion
Is the preacher in politics so important
that the mere announcement of his posi
tion throws the politicians iqto connip
tions?
A Bill designating the first Sunday in
June as "Fathers' Day" was introduced
in the Ilouse by Representative Moore,
of Pennsylvania. We second the motion.
Everybody gets something but father.
It is time the poor fellow had an inning,
for doing all the work and pay ing all the
the bills.
Gibson In New Role.
John R. Gibson, of Richmond, can
dia'e for the Daavillj Collectorship, ap
peared in a new role and acquaintances
passing through the rotunda in the Capi
tol stopped, looked in surprise and won
dered if he was preparing to go the 1 ee
ture held. 11 r. Gibson is known for bis
good nature, and when Major ' Alford
Judson, formerly of Jackson's Corps of
the Confederate Army, appeared with
a hiir flair, which ha is dedicating to a
movement for universal peace, and asked
Mr Gibson to hold it, that the gentle
man willingly complied.
All this happened right in front of a
huge picture of Gen. Washington sur
rendering his commission in the Rev
olutionary army Before the Kentuck-
tn realized wnat was Happening he had
oeen surrounoeu oy a crowd 01 earnest
nmn .nrf a few men with Mmr J.,,1.
son in the forefront, and the latter had
doeinoL Lake verv much to atlrant .
MIvVU VII KU IUI Ul W B LTOBtJ II. II
crowd under the big dome, and as the
words of the veteran rang out, thrown
backward and forward by the famous
-whispering stcne, all eyes were on the
IRtle band.
Mr. Gibson is tall and imposing, and
as he held the mast of the flag strang
ers stopped and asked in whispers who
be was and what be had done.
Thoe who knew Mr. Gibson did not
wonder that bis face rather had a pained
look as be thus unsuspectingly had fame
thrust upon him, but he proved equal to
the demands, even when some of the
overzealous women in the band pushed
forward and fervently kissed the folds of
flag as it was gracefully unfurled in the
hands of the Richmond man.
Friends of Mr. Gibson said the inci-
Hant. nrvuAfl that (1 m str elwoiia annol
the occasion, ac-d that he would be right
on the job and equal to it if named Col-!
j lector. Louisville Post Washington Cor
CHANGE ill OUR
TAX LAWSilEEDED
Constitutional- Amendment
To Be Voted On IrT
I November
pr - ; "
EQUITABLE SYSTEM DEMANDED
Last General Assembly Passed an
Amendment to the 8tate Constitu
tion Relating to Revenue and Taxa
tion. Frankfort. Ky. (Special) The last
General Assembly in Kentucky passed
an amendment to the State Constitu
tion relating to revenue and taxation
with a view of abolishing the anti
quated general property tax and sub
stituting a more flexible system known
to be more equitable and productive
of greater revenue In other states.
The tax commission appointed un
der another apt at the same session
made a thorough Investigation and re
ported unanimously in condemnation
of the present law and strongly urged
the adoption of the amendment by the
voters at the November election.
It is a significant fact that since the
adoption of the present Constitution
In 1891, which provided that "taxes
should be uniform on all property,"
large. volume of personal property has
disappeared from the assessors rolls
for the simple reason that such prop
erty was taxed out of existence or at
least out of sight
The owner of a bond, for Instance,
who received 4 Interest and was
called upon to pay In some instances
t or more In taxes either sold his
bond or failed to return It for taxa
tion and cash, notes, bonds, stocks In
foreign corporations and such like In
vestments are apparently no longer
owned by Kentucklans.
Burden of Taxes Transferred.
This has had a tendency to transfer
the burden of taxation to real estate
and other property in sight and Is not
nlT unequal but unjust
Ttx eBUt OWner "OUKI"
dlmlni8h tu Taiue and i order to
protect himself transfers of property
for "one dollar and other valuable con-
slderatlons" has demoralized the true
values and leaves the assessor no
guide to follow.
Our cltlsens have unblushlngly
omitted such Items In their returns
for assessment and havl felt Justified
in doing so,
The finances of the state have fall
en Into confusion and revenue agents
and arbitrary boards of so-called
Equalization have failed to discover
such property and secure their assess
ment.
Under the present law every man is
practically his own assessor and the
courts have sustained the practice, as
tne jaw permits no other course.
General Property Tax Desirable.
other states have long since recog
nized the inefficiency of the "General
Property Tax," and in these states we
Bee PenterprlM awarded and wealth
accumulating, while the tendency In
Kentucky has been to hide our light
and incidentally our vaiuaDies ior tear
our progress has been retarded
I Our population diminished and aside
from the land owners ana some mer-
chants we do not seem to have much
I kmHIi loft In tha state.
Money like water flows along the
I lines of least resistance, and If we
throw up a dam. However slight, it
will be diverted.
Such a trifling obstacle as taxes. If
unequally distributed, may prove to
be a barrier of Insurmountable propor
tions, however Insignificant It may
seem from a casual view.
No one desires willingly to become
a law breaker, a deceiver or an eva
der, and-yet he must be all of these If
he follows the old maxim, ""When In
Rome you must do as the Romans do.
Is this true? Go look at the asses
sors books and see where men who
are known 'to be wealthy get off by
paying little or no taxes on personal
1 property assessed by themselves.
Do self respecting men care to fol
low this example?
A shrewd business man may have
large Investments in bonds and fall to
return them for taxation by many well
known practices of evasion. He re
ceives the full return on his invest
ment
A widow or orphan may be left
bonds and the estate may have to be
settled In court The revenue agent
finds It out and sues for omitted as
sessments of former years and the as
sessor puts them on the tax list The
widow and orphan are compelled to
pay two or three per cent In taxes and
I live on the remainder.
ls such a system fair?
Taxes, In a free self-governed coun
try, should be the least matter to wor
ry about and yet they can be made so
unfair and Irksome they drive people
away and keep others from coming In.
This Is happening all the time in Ken
tucky. "' "
We have a chance to remedy this
evil and if disregarded now we -will
have to wait another five years before
I n presents itself again.
I It is a clear duty to vote for this
I constitutional amendment at the No-
vember election and every citizen In
the state should vote himself and urge
his neighbor to do the same if Ken
tucky is ever to be dragged out of itv
lassitude and kept in . the front rank
I of progress, prosperity and peace.
Of Interest To Farmers.
W. P. Kincaid bought Geo. W. Car-
t'M 5 1 2 acrM of tobacco in the field
1 , rnn . j . -n u ji 1. i
for nd wl11 hdle it himself.
Stanford Interior Journal. .
I T Ty . , , . .
I urwm suippeu His second car
I la(i of stock this season to the Wilson
Live Stock Co., of Wilson, N.'C, on
Wednesday, 12 horses which cost I1C5
each and 11 mules for which he paid
$200 per head. Mr Geo. D." Robinson
shipped a car load of horse and mules,
25 in number, to Cordele, Ga. The stock
cost him from $150 to 1245, and included
in the Jot was a pair of mules purchased
of James Peoples for $500. Lancaster
Rooord. t
"Cordy" Mountjoy bought of various
parties twelve suckling mare mules at
from $100 to f 130. Mr. Mountjoy sold
eight of the above to L. V. Harkness,
the millionaire turfman, for $380. This
1 mkes thirty-six hybrids be has sold
Mr. Harkness for his own use at Lex-
ington. Anderson News.
A Suggestion or Two.
A friend handed the editor the following
which is worthy of thought: Many per
sons make complaints from time to time
about the water rate, the gas bills and
electric bills, etc-., and max H no
worth while for the city to have a pub
lic inspector to read all meters each
month and pay for such service out of
the city treasury? By this means the I
people would know whether they were!
overcharged for such public convenien
ces: otherwise it seems to many persons
that in order the protect thepublio's in
terests thai all these public utilities
should be owned by the city. It is a
pertinent question ''Why should private
corporations fatten at public expense?"
The launtfry agents and works of this
city are in the "laundry trust" and have!
increased their prices from 25 to 50 perl
cent the past month. lias the patrons'
income increased accordingly? How
about a good man for an out of the
trust" agency for the city and let all the I
people stand by him, even after honest!
prices are restored. Who will be Ibis
trust busier?" We are with you, and
to stay. Pro Bono Publico.
j NEWS NOTES j
Three persons were burned to death
in a fire at New Haven, Ey.
The personal property of John D
Rockefeller in the city of New York is
assessed at $5,000,000, leading the per
sonal property list of that city.
Ben White, who was killed in Clark
county Sunday, was to have married
Miss Mae Ewing next month, and she is
heart-broken over his untimely death.
President Wilson approved the new
Federal regulations for the protection of
migratory, game and insectivorous birds
promulgated by the Department of Ag
riculture.
Governor McCreary has proclaimed
Thursday, October 0, the anniversary
of the Chicago fire, as Fire Prevention
day in Kentucky. The Governors of I
practically all the States are taking sim
ilar action, and that day will be gener
ally set aside for the consideration of the
fire waste of the country and of the
State, with exercises in the public
schools and meetings of commercial o:
ganizations, and for the cleaning up of
premises in preparation for the fire haz
ards of the fall and winter.
Chtirch Nof-fs i
Dr. Yennell's meeting at ilarrodsburg
Christian church continues with u nab it
ed interest. More than 75 have united
with the church. No time has been set
for closing and the meeting is still in
progress.
At the Louisville Conference, which
met in Campbellsville, it was reported
to the body that about 4,000 additions
bad been made during the year, over
half of which was by profession of
faiih. y
About seventy-five men have arranged
to attend the Presbyterian banquet at
the Masonic Temple on next Monday
night. Elegant covers are being provid
ed and a delightful social evening is in
store for these men.
Dr F. W. Uinitt, of Danville, will
preach at the morning service at the
First Presbyterian church next Sabbath.
He is a most charming preacher and a
man who always has a modern and help
ful message for the people. The public
is cordially invited to bear him.
During the services conducted by Dr.
Ogden in this city next week at the
Presbyterian church, some splendid mu
sic will be rendered by various ladies.
On Tuesday night. Miss Wiggings will
sing; Wednesday, Miss Bright; on Thurs
day, Mrs. Hanger, and on Friday Miss
Alley.
Next Sabbath is Rally Day at the Pres
byterian Sabbath School and a good pro
gram will be rendered by the children
and a goodly number of new pupils is
expected to be enrolled. A class is there
for everyone, and every one thould be
in a class.
Dr. Scanlondeliverd his first address on
the post Apostolic history of the chris
tian church, at his mid-week service
this week. The series will be continu
ed for about two months, touching dif
ferent phases of the history and devel
opment of the church after the death of
the last Apostle.
The latest trend of authoritative fash
ion for women is fully exemplified in'
the splendid assemblage of winter styles
now being shown. B. E. Belue & Co.
(It Telephone 768.
CURIOUS BITS
OF HISTORY
A SEVEN DAYS' FISHERMAN
. KING.
By A. W. MACY.
In 1M7, when the kingdom of
Naples was under the grinding
rule of 8pain, a fisherman of
Sorrento was stung to madness
by the Indignities offered his
wife by Spanish officials, be
cause she had attempted to
smuggle a few handfuls of flour.
So furious wss he that he tors
down an edict that had Just
been posted by the authorities.
Ths whole population. Including
women and children, rallied
around him. Forty . years of
Spanish oppression had msds
them frantic They terrified ths
viceroy, resisted ths soldiers
successfully, and killed many of
the Spanish residents. They se
cured a revocation of many ob
noxious edicts, the sbollshment
of oppressive taxes, and full
pardon for all who engaged In
the Ineurrectlon. The fisherman,
whose name was Masanlslo, was
the leader In all this, snd be
came ths Idol of ths people. He
ruled Naples for seven days, but
his success seems to have
turned his head. Ho became
dictatorial and oppressive, a.id
wss put to death by the popu
lace. Hones ha la called tha
Seven Days' King.
(Panrrlght, SU, by Joseph a BewissJ
Corner Second and Main
Rheumatism and Bright's
Disease.
Prof. Budlong was Quickly
Relieved of Both Afflictions
By Using Rheuma.
If you suffer from any form of Rheu
matism, remember that RHEUMA goes
to work quickly to remove the cause,
not simply to relieve the distress. Many
years' use has demonstrated that it goes
to the seat of the disease and expels the
poisonous matter through the natural
channels the kidneys, bowels, liver and
skin.
"For many years I was troubled with
Rheumatism, also with Bright's Disease
of the Kidneys. I suffered awfully.
tried many advertised remedies. After
using your truly remarkable preparation
RHEUMA, I was fully cured." Prof.
C. J. Budlong, Sound View, Conn.
RHEUMA is guaranteed by B. L. Mid-
deiton, who sells it for 50 cents a bottle.
Down in Mississippi, a white mob
lynched two negroes and then rounded
up all the darkies in. town and drove
them to where the bodies were hanging,
warning them of a like fate if their be
havior was unsatisfactory.
Mr. and Mrs. Wade Pedigo, of Warren
county, after a peaceful married life of
nearly half a century, had a misunder
standing which ended in a divorce suit
The petition was granted. They lived
apart for a while, but neither could stand
the separation and they were remarried
Tuesday.
Public Sale
ON
Tuesday, Oct. 21, 1913
At 10 O'clock A. M.
I will sell my farm of
120 Acres
6 room house in good repair,
good new barn and all neces-
saty outbuildings. About
30 acres in cultivation, bal
ance in grass. Good orchard
and all kinds of fruit. In
College Hill, good schools,
churches and stores in imme
diate neighborhood.
Terms ; One-half cash, bal
ance in one and two years,
with lien retained on proper
ty.
J.R.PARKL
WINCHESTER, KY
INTERU.1BAN SCHEDULE
-BKTWKKN-
LEXINGTON and NICHOLASVILLE
LKAVB
LKAVJI
LEXINGTOS
XICHOLABVILLK
a. m
.. 6:40 a. m 6:00
.. 7:55 " 7:13
.. 9:10 " 8:30
10:25 ' " 9:45
..11:40 " 11:00
I p. m 12:55 p. m 12:15
" 2:111 " 1:30
" 3:25 " 2:45
" 4:40 - 4:00
" 8:00 " 5:15
" 7:20 " :40
" 9:10 " 8:30
" 11:00 " 10:25
r CONNECTIONS
AT
NICHOLASVILLE
TO AND ntOlf
RICHMOND -
Car Lv. Lexington 10:29 a. m.', connects
with the L. A. A. for Richmond at
11:11 a. m.
Car Lv. Lexinjrton 4:40 p.m., connects
- with the L. & A. tot Riohmond at
6:42 p. m.
Car Lv. Nicholasvllle at 8:30 a. m., con
nects with the UA. from Rich
mond 8:22 a. m.
Car Lv. Nicholasville at 2:45 p. m., con
nects with the L. fc A. from Rich
mood 3:38 p. m.
Attention
i feel certain there would be fewer maii orders sent
out of this town if the folks of this community realized
how complete and up to the minute a stock of boys'and
men's clothing and furnishings is at their disposal
right here in this store.
Most people who order by mail do sounder the belief
that they are saving money and obtaining the benefit
of a wider range of selection. ...
Every one acknowledges that when conditions are
usual, the local merchant who assumes a liberal share
of the burden of taxation and is in the forefront of
every movement for the town's best interests is en
titled to the preference.
Now my friends, the only favor I ask is that you in
vestigate and satisfy yourself as to the correctness of
my assertion. For example, I feature that splendid
make of hand tailored clothes for young men, the fam
ous 4'Collegian"line,also the National all wool standard
for boys, "WOOLY BOY" Clothes, the Florsheim
Shoe for Men and the "Sil Kid" Shoe for Women. -
See the great and pleasing variety of styles and pat.
terns, compare these clothes which represent the ut
most in quality, togealher with my very reasonable
prices, with any mail order merchant you wish. Con
sider that you do not have to wait days or weeks for
what you want, neither are you expected to pay for
your selection before you see it Also when any pur
chase you make here is not satisfactory I consider it a
priviledge to make it so and with out quibbling or
waste of time consumed by correspondence.
Your patronage is soliciied entirely on a basis of sat
isfying value and personal service which is possible
only when customer and merchant meet face to face.
I hope you "will take advantage of this invitation and
put me to to the test. Then you will do full justice to
yourself in the matter of obtaining the greatest possi
ble value and satistaction in your clothing, purchases.
Yours very truly
J. S. Stanif er
Home of
. HERE ALL WEEK
October 6 to October 11
2 Band Concerts Daily
Monster Riding Devices
Big Free Acts
High Class Shows
Acme Amusement Co's
Bi Hippodrome Circus
See CoL Egan's Red Dome Musical
Comedy Show
Taylor's Plantation Show
ABE HAZZA'S
Rapolla,the Armless Wonder
Marion, the Tiny Mite
Roach's Fighting Hyena
Come on Kids to
Take A Ride on
See Dare
Dive Into WaterDefying
FREE
See Prof . Jones,
Do His Marvelous Trapeze
On Moberley's Lot
Do ycu see this picture? Well this is a common occur
rence. The papers contain almost daily of where people losa
their money by hiding it unsafe places. If you want to HIDE
your money hide it behind our thick walls and strong locks
where it will be SAFE. We refer those wno have not bank
ed with us to those who HAVE .
Make OUR bank YOUR bank
. STATE BANK & TRUST CO -
Good Clothes
2
Phillips' Dog and Pony Grcus
7 IN 1 SHOW
Col. Lagg's Reptile Show
The Joy Mill
RatlifTs Deep Sea Show
the Meny-Go-Round
the Ferris Wheel
Devil Myers
Death For Your Amusement
TO ALL
King of Air Artists
Act FREE TO ALL
. Water and First Sts
HC HID HIS MONEY IN
THE GROUND. ITS GONE
IFHE HAD HIDDEN IT IN
OUR BANK IT WOULD
BE SAFE NOW
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