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The Richmond climax. (Richmond, Ky.) 1897-1914, May 06, 1914, Section 1, Image 1

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RICHMOND
MADISON COUNTY. KENTUCKY. WEDNESDAY, MAY 6. 1914
m A I ' M P ? 1
AMvMssEBftaEa(iDtf
ATIS
PrGmmwi stevtnson v v v
ILLUSTRATIONS fROM PHOTOGRAPHS
OF THE STAGE PRODUCTION ,
CHAPTER VI.
"lire. Slada won't sign over the cot
tage," Hayes began abruptly, "I calTt
do anything more."
"She must" Slade uttered jtn?
words through get teeth. "She can't
live there. Robert, you are the only
person who knows us both thoroughly.
I want you to bring this njatter to a
finish quietly and kindly and bow.
Why don't you see her and pave
it out with her?" Hayes suggested.
"We had it put the night I left the
house and told her not to wait u& for
me," Slade reminded him. "I never
quarrel with anyone more than once.''
He eyed Hayes critically for a min
ute. "Vou'ra with me, aren't you?"
as if an idea bad juet occurred to
him.
"I'm awfully sorry for Mrs. Blade,"
Hayes began, when Slade interrupted.
"Look here, Hayes I want a dl
vorce," and he seated himself squarely
in front of the astonished Hayes.
"A divorce?"
"That's what I want," and his Hps
shut grimly.
"But. my God!" Hayes wae amazed.
You djdn't want it in the first place.
PSMBIBaBBaMBMHMpMPIpBHqi
"I Think I'd Like to Make a Bargain
With You."
All you wanted was to live your own
life. Do you expect me to help you
get rid of Mrs. Slade?"
'Don't go crazy," Slade advised, not
a suggestion of feeling evident in his
voice or manner.
"If you do you are due for a sur
prise. ' I can't go sticking a knife into
that woman's heart. I won't."
"You're a h 1 of a lawyer!" Slade's
anger was rising.
"I'm not that sort of a lawyer.
Hayes roee as if to dismiss the sub
ject. "Whatever sort of a lawyer you are
I made you, Hayes." i
'I know you did," returned Hayes,
bitterly. "You've told me that before
and this is what comes of letting a
man make you!"
"You bet, rank ingratitude," hotly.
Hayes leaned forward, bis arms on
his knees and looked Slade square in
the eyes.
"I honestly' think you're drunk with
all this power and prosperity. That
little woman wae the apple of yonr
eye. I always said to myself: 'There's
one man who does stick to lis wife!'
I didn't believe wild horses could, drag
you away from home "
"One minute!" interrupted Slade.
"AH that has nothing to do with you.
Neither you nor anyone living can
interfere with me now. Have you
stopped to figure out, and I Bay It with
all kindness and with all respect, what
sort of a governor's lady Mrs. Slade
would make, feeling as she does?"
"Well, what sort of a governor
would you make if you - were di
vorced?" Hayes questioned, mock
ingly. "Those men in there," and he
jerked his thumb toward the smoking-room
door; "will they stand for
that?"
''They've got to I own them, boots
and all!"
But you don't own public opinion."
thundered Hayes, banging his fist
down on the table, scattering the
copies of the senator's speech in all
directions.
"Why don't J?"" Slade questioned
with an arrogant smile disfiguring his
mouth. "I'm going to buy half of
Merrltt'i paper tonight, I guess that
will be public opinion enough for ma.
More than that, 111 stand as a man
whose wife has deserted him. That's
how it will end. Mrs. Slade vM de-
OS u
advertising are fequaliy distributed between the tw& ' See
J
cide where she's to lh
be at some distance."
"You won't get your divorce
through desertion," Hayes scoffed. "I
know her. You can't do It."
?l can't do it, eh?" Slade's eyes
held a "nasty expression, "That's
what they've been telling me all my
life. Ever since I was a barefooted
little brat running around (ho mines
they've said to me: 'You can't do
this and you can't do that' But I
always did it. Let me tell you, young
man, after all I've conquered no wom
an is going to stop me)
''Can't o it, eh?'' he repeated, pug
naciously. "You watch me do it! You
young Jackanapes! I'm as good as
deserted now. The only question is:
Are you going to sea Mf: plade put
her aboard a train east or not?"
"Mrs, Slade has been my best
friend," Hayes answered quietly. "I
love her dearlyW hfo voice broke.
"All right. That settles it You
turn over every scrap of paper of mine
you have by" he thought a moment
"by tomorrow night. Then you can
walk the ties to the devil, young man,
and go back where I found you."
As Hayes turned to go, Strickland
hurried into the room.
"Merritt has just introduced a very
unexpected subject in the smoking
room the question ofwell, you've
got to know It, Slade the question of
Mrs. Slade."
Hayes wheeled around and watched
to see what effect this announcement
would have on Slade.
"There are strangers there who
learned of your er domestic difficul
ties for the first time tonight" Strick
land continued. "Merritt has thrown
the bombshell."
"Why, I thought" Slade began to
protest.
"He's all right" came the senator's
reassuring tones. "It had to come
out He's got his coat off In there
for you now. He maintains that the
opposition papers are bound to take
it up at . any moment Now, what do
you advise?"
"The truth," thundered Slade. "My
wife is preparing to desert me. It
will happen" Hayes jumped up and
flung himself out of the room ''to
morrow the next day any hour."
"I see," and the senator looked
grave. "Is this irrevocable, Slade?"
"Irrevocable," declared Slade, posi
tively. "As I have told you several
times, senator, it is irrevocable. Ill
stand by that."
Convinced that Slade knew his own
mind in this matter as well as he had
the reputation for knowing- it in all
other matters, Strickland returned to
the waning politicians.
Slade had been alone but a few
minutes when Katherlne returned.
"Well, Mr. glade," the girl ex
claimed, "things seem to be coming
our way."
Slade was In no mood for mere con
versatlon. He was annoyed at Hayes'
attitude, and incensed because his
private affairs were being publicly
discussed in the next room. Mentally
he consigned Hayes to the devil, his
wife to . the far East of the country,
and registered a vow with himself that
he would have that divorce and the
woman he wanted In spite pf every
body and. everything,
He resolved to sound Katherlne out
then and there. He turned over in
his mind the most cold-blooded prop
osition that a man ever made to a
woman. He was planning to ask her
to marry him, when he should be
free, to decorate his home, preside at
his table, share his wealth and the
honors of the chief executive of the
state. There would be no warmth
in his tone, no love in his heart no
hunger of his lips for here, no yearn
ing of his arms for her yielding figure,
there would be none of the fire of
youth, nothing of the love of little
children, nothing of the spirit that
makes of marriage a sacrament rather
than a thing of convenience. .
As Katherlne walked across the
room, moving toward him with the
quiet grace- and dignity of the well-
trained, well-gowned womaa, he had
a fleeting memory of the slight, badly
dressed little woman, whose diffidence
in strange surroundings had always
fretted him. She a governor's wife
Impossible! He rose and stood be
side the woman whom he proposed to
use as another Irving stepping stone.
"Miss Strickland," his mind fully
made up, "yoi;'ve done a lot for me
n the last few weeks while you've
been making that bust I think I un
derstand yoo In a way. The more
see of you the more I think I I'd
like to make a well, a bargain with
you. That doe8n't seem to be quits.
the word," he hesitated as the girl
averted her eyes. "Yet I think thafi
what we call It"
"A bargain?" echoed Katherlne.'
"Yes, a bargain," be repeated.
never knew but one woman well that
was Mrs. Slade. She's a good woman
a mighty good woman, but we' cant
I never had a borne nota horns
CLIMAX.
like Strickland's. When I have another
house that'll be what 111 want, I'll
want my friends, my acquaintances,
to come there. I want well head-
"You Are Going to Rob a Poor Little
WomanP
quarters. And I want a woman at
the head of my house that I can be
proud of like Strickland."
Katherlne was not surprised. She
had anticipated some such , move as
this on his part, but now that she
was face to face with the unvarnished
suggestion, she found herself more
shocked than she would have be
lieved.
"In a couple of months 111 stand
free," he went on. "Perhaps sooner.
don't expect any woman's going to
love me she Isn't Got to do that
when you're young. But I'd do all I
could for the woman. She'd have ev
erything money and the power that
goes with it I want to say right
here that I wouldn't speak if I thought
young Hayes had a chance. I saw
he didn't"
At the mention of Hayes' name
Katherlne had an instant's vision of
Bob's tender face his eyes burning
with love looking into hers of his
youth his strength his fine honor,
and her heart cried out desperately.
pitifully, for the shelter of his arms.
In another moment the old recur
rent vision of life in the old town,
dull, cheap, uninteresting, and the
ure of what Slade was offering, the
money, the clothes, the servants, the
power to reign supreme, swept her
off her feet The thought of divorce
did not terrify her. Mrs. Slade, whom
she had never seen, was only a name.
As Slade watched her standing
straight and white, he feared he had
been too brutally blunt
"You needn't think it over now,"
he hastened to add. "Perhaps you
will later, and perhapf you won't
That's for you to decide. I guess I've
said all I can say."
But Katherlne was not a woman to
shrink from a situation because of
ts unpleasant features. She knew
that she couldn't have all the things
she wanted without some suffering,
some pain. Her father's world had
taught her that love was a thing of
small consideration where marriage
waa concerned, unless it went with
the advancement of one's ambitions.
Love was not of the world. . Place,
power, wealth these were of the
world and this man offered them to
her.
"This Isn't a matter of sentiment"
she agreed with him calmly. "I'll be
perfectly frank with you, I don't say
I won't think It over. I know just
what you want of a woman. When
you can go to my father free there
won't be any barrier in the way."
She offered her hand as if to bind
the bargain. He held It for a brief
instant and with a hurried "thank
you" left the room.
CHAPTER VII.
Left alone, Katherlne drew a long
breath. Her face was set and her eyee
were harder than it is good for a
woman's eyes to be. She pictured to
herself the future for which she had
Just bargained. There would be
wealth no more pinching struggle
with masked poverty, her father at
ease, his political debts all paid.
There would be no more pretense that
her art was for love of It and not for
money she would be free "to follow
her deelreB in this as in all else.
There would be honor and power as
wife of the state's chief executive
and that was but a step to further
honors that she would achieve at
Slade's side with Slade always with
Slade ah!
As she stood thus the horror of what
she had agreed to do swept over her,
and she sank moaning and shivering
into a chair, covering her face as if
to chut out the hideous vision of her
self as glade's wife. She did not
hear Bob enter, and did not know he
waa in the room until he touched her
shoulder with tender, alarm, exclaim
ing, "Why, Katherlne, what's the
matter?"
(Continued on Page 2. Section 2)
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