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Kentucky Irish American. (Louisville, Ky.) 1898-1968, July 05, 1919, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069180/1919-07-05/ed-1/seq-2/

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,saa2arTJOrsr iri&xs AJWtucouaLr.
KENTUCKY IRISH flMERKffiH
PUBLISHEb EVERY SATURDAY.
fu)ted to the Sochi and Morl Advwcement of Ifhh Americans and CthoH3
Officially Indorsed by Ancient Order of Hibernians. Young Men's
Institute and Catholic Knights of America.
KENTUCKY IRISH AMERICAN PRINTING CO., Iocorpottui. Publishers
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR, SINGLE COPvTc
Entered at the Loulivllle Poitofflce Sccond-Clau Matter.
MA-ms all Communication! to tha KENTUCKY IRISH AMERICAN, 319-321 Watt Green St.
TRADES ttyST) COUNCIL
COMING EVENTS.
LOUISVILLE, KY SATURDAY, JULY 5, 1919 1
July 15 Annual picnic of St.
Paul's church, RIvoli Park, Preston
and Kentucky.
July 17 Euchre and .lotto for
benefit of Visitation Home, Fontalno
Ferry Park, afternoon and evening.
July 15-1G Annual lawn fote of
St. Ann's church on grounds, Sev
enth and Davies avenue.
July 24 Annual picnic of St.
'Aloysius church, at Poweo Valloy,
church grounds.
August 5 Annual picnic for Holy
Trinity church on Park grpunas, at.
Matthews,
August 6. Annual picnic and
chicken supper of Holy Trinity
church, St. Matthews, on church
grounds.
T103 CHILDREN.
ANNIVERSARY.
cation the final disposition of the Tho house that haa the children is
schools. Tho Tespectlve States may the house that has tho joy In It,
rroday In celebrating Independ- do precisely what they wish with To .me 'tis .only home that has a girl-
' thai DKhnnla ni-xvLlml nlnrnve, hfi ' en Or a L'Oy in It.
also celebrate tho ' An' every ono that's added only
we
thoy wish to do with their schools
ence day
twenty-first anniversary of the Ken-Whnt thJ Socretaty of Education
tucky Irish American and rejoice on wisnes them to do. They are in the
our birthday that many of our old position, of little Johnny, who
friends and patrons that attended
our christening are here to greet us
"when we are twenty-one."
DUPLICATE CASE.
Somo of the English sympathiz
ers In this country are denouncing
the Senate for expressing sympathy
for Ireland, but this class seem to
forget that Ireland is trying to do
Just what the United States did one
hundred and fifty years ago get
away from English control. Our
forefathers fought and died for tho
same purpose that Ireland Is striv
ing for now. And the population
of Ireland today is larger than that
of our country in U7i76.
SUSPICIOUS ACT.
Old John Dull is having a hard
time trying to explain to France
why the German sailors were given
such an easy opportunity to sink the
entire German fleet, which was sup
posed to have been under close
watch by English authorities. It Is
said, and reasonably so, that the
French think there was a method
in England's madness. Under the
peace terms Franco would have
been awarded some of the German
warships and become a competitor
of England's large navy.
CHECK TO FORCE.
Due to the looseness of the armis
tice terms under which German
crews could remain on their vessels
the powerful German navy Is now at
the bottom of the sea. Responsibil
ity for theslnking of the fleet rests,
Of course, directly upon Great
Britain. Aside from this aspect of
the question this act is but an ex
pression of the animosity still ex
isting between the allies and the
central powers. National ambition
and commercial rivalry will con
tinue to exist In spite of the terri
ble lessons so (forcibly taught by
the war. It is hardly possible that
the mere signing of the peace treaty
will do away with such desires, but
it will tend to check, for a time at
least, any attempt to dominate the
cvll.'zed world by foice.
makes the place the cheerier;
If childher are the gifts o' God,
the more Ho send the merrier.
r tlllU Tl UnA n.m
iq sure, every uiiiu uiro x e unu brc
i onmatMnc o mv hltRci -fho mnrp.
glven a dime, together with permls- Ant every jitte ba,Dy faco my lips
sion to spend it as he likes and tho were drawn to kiss the more,
strict Injunction to drop it forth- An' though I know the trouble an'
With in hl3 savings bank. Accord-1 . the thrlal and the care they are.
. . , .. 1t .. . . An' thougn I know how often iwlld,
lng to Section 15 the Secretary has hovr wayWar(i an' how q'uaro they
full power to withhold the Federal are,
apportionment from any State, An' though 'tis many a night I've
"whenever he shall determine that I w1aetmhed besldo the llttle 'beds of
such apportionment or apportion-' An. held tnolr utie hands an' cooled
ments made to said State for the the fevered little heads of them;
current fiscal year are not being ex- An' though I know tho surly moods
pended in accordance with the pro-1 'SZ
visions of this act." ' lovc of nn the rest of them?
These words are capable of only No, no, the trouble that I've had,
one interpretation, and they mean I through tnom, I'll never tuo at an,
that the Secretary of Education ta sure. 75? I'd'dS'tlTl
UNCONDITIONALLY.
Germany has signed uncondition
ally the peace conditions of the al
lied and associated powers. After
having promised to meet the allied
demands, the spirit of opposition
apparently prevailed ifor a time, but
this was overcome and now every
thing points to world peace that It
Is hoped will continue for all time.
The German people accepted the
treaty because they could not en
dure the alternative, but there is
no concealment of the fact that they
signed with the greatest reluctance.
That the terms were severe was to
be expected, but when we consider
the 'bloodshed and carnage brought
In by tho war can we say they are
unjust? We have longed lor this
day for the past five years. Let us
now thank God it is at hand.
vested with final power to rule upon
the competence of the local commu
nity to educate its children, and to
enforce his ruling by the withdrawal
of (Federal funds. If the Secretary
"shall determine" that certain
courses of study, school programmes,
methods of training teachers, al
though freely adopted by tho State,
are "not in accordance with the pro
visions" of the Smith-Towner bill,
all Federal aid will be withdrawn,
until courses of study, school pro
grammes and methods of training
teachers, acceptable to the educa
tional dictator at Washington, are
substituted. That is, not tho local
community, but the Federal Govern
ment, ;repre3onted solely by a politi
cal appointee, shall fix finally tho
content of study and tho methods
of teacher training in any State. If
this plan does not utterly destroy
the local control of the schools,
there is a very general misunder
standing of the terms "local" and
"Federal" control. It has always
been, thought that "local control"
meant that the schools were found
ed, financed and ruled by the com
munities ia which they existed. Now
we are asked to bolleve that the
New York schools, for instance, are
controlled locally," when they are
controlled by a bureaucrat in Wash
ington. Tho Smith-Towner bill is
"Prussianlsm," pure and simple.
-Denis A. McCarthy.
.
S0GIETV. j
'
Miss Durrett Oglesby, of Pres-
tonla, leaves shortly for Fu-ancc.
Miss Louise Smith, of Chicago, is
the guest of Miss Irene McCabe, of
reservoir Park.
LEADER. DE VALERA.'
Mrs. Thomas J. Duffy
week for Chicago, where
spend the summer.
left last
she will
Mr. and Mrs. John F. Oetken mo
tored to Salem, Ind., last Sunday
on a visit to friends.
Miss Corinne Mazzonl left Wed
nesday for Fort Wayne, Ind., for
a visit .of several weeks.
Miss Mamie Hays spent several
days last week with her sister, Mrs.
William Grant, at Okalona.
Mrs. Mary Chawk, who has been
ill at Sts. Mary and Elizabeth Hos
pital, is now getting along nicely.
Miss Lavinla Kampfmueller left
Sunday for Chicago, where she will
take a course at the Art Institute.
Mrs. John A. Ryan and son, Cole
man Ryan, are In Philadelphia vis
iting Mrs. Ryan's brother, Philip
Carney.
Charles J. Curran, of New York,
arrived Sunday to Join Mrs. Curran
in a visit to Mr. and Mrs. W. J.
Curran.
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Farley have
moved Into the city from Jefferson
town and taken apartments for the
summer.
BRIGHTER ASPECTS.
With the submission by President
Wilson to Premier Clemenceau,
President of the Peace Conference,
of the Borah resolution, asking a
hearing for the Irish delegates and
the arrival in this country of Ed
ward De Valera in the Interest of
the Irish republic, the Irish ques
tion has taken on a brighter aspect.
The True Voice predicts that much
Information, hitherto denied us be
cause of British censorship or con-
Prestonla.
De "Valera is here here in Amer
ica. We are to see him, to heaf his
message from his own lips, to hear
the voice which Ireland obeys. The
boastful fleets of Britain like bullies
ride thfi kpjis. (lrlm rlrnilnniurht nntl
swlfe destrover lurk off the coasts Miss Kate Lawler left Thursday
of Ireland. But Irish skill and dar- for Nashville, where she will take
in,? in f,n tin.,.. riniji ,,! ' a Rovemment Dosltlon until Sen-
outmatched the might of empire tember.
outreached the lion's claws! Like .
an eagle from the clouds, suddenly! Miss Vera Gannan has returned
ho is among us. He comes, the from St. Benedict's Academy to
elected President of a Government spend the summer at her home at
founded on the will and mandate of j Prestonia.
tho Irish people, to ask the Judg-
ment of America, the unfailing1 Mrs. D. 0. Callaghan, Crescent
champion of liberty. And how shall Hill, had as a guest the ipast week
Americans of Irish blood honor the '. her niece, Miss Theodora Coves, of
leader of their race? With mere
cheers and shouting? With mere
vows of devotion? These we give
spontaneously; but they are easy to
give. They cost no effort, they in
volve no sacrifice. Think what the
men and women of Ireland have
given labor and fortunes,
ana tears! We are not called ono
tight and die, to bleed and Ian
in prison,, to risk fortune ana
and life ItBelf. We are asked only
to fill the war chest; to give a little
work and a little money; to provide
an Irish Victory Fund with which
the last grim struggle on the field
of world-wide public opinion may be
waged and won." The Irish republic
is a reality; hut so is the British
army of occupation In Ireland and
so Is the British propaganda in
America. The Hon will not loose
his prey the liar will not stay his
pen for all our wordy enthusiasm.
But give our leaders the sinews of
war and the lie shall fall before
the truth about Ireland, and Amer
ica, knowing the truth, will break
the grip of thq Hon.
gustus Kyle Flynn, of New York,
was solemnized Thursday at noon
in the rectory of St. Mary Magda
lene's church, The Rev. Father
Driscoll performed the ceremony In
the presence of the two families
and a few close friends'. Tho bride
was attired in peach colored Georg
etto crepe, with hat to match. Her
corsage was forget-me-nots and Ill
lies of tho valley. Capt. Flynn
served about two years In tho States
and overseas. In Miss Keyer's mar
riage Kentucky loses another of
her beautiful girls, for after an ex
tended wedding trip Capt. Flynn
and Mrs. Flynn will go to New
York, where they will make their
home.
YOUR OWN HOUSE.
Tho ."Own j. Your Own Home"
movement in Louisville is progress
ing in tho most favorable way. This
is a matter that" the people them
selves can support. There Is no
better civic policy than to encourage
local people to- own their own
homes. Several strong committees
are at work, and if tho people them
selves take hold tho campaign will
be a great success.
KNIGHT BOOTED.
Sir Charles Allom, propelled by a
dozen pairs of boots and the strong
arms of guests, employes and tho
proprietor, came sailing out of the
cntranco of the St. Regis Hotel, New
York City, on Thursday afternoon.
He made the trip over tho eight
steps of the lobby entrance, hit the
curb and rolled over. The handsome
Briton rose, dusted his light gray
tweeds curled his small gray
mustache, twirled his cane and left
the scene. Here follows tho story
of the events preceding the bouncing
of Sir Charles, as told by a dozen
guests at the St. Regis and the
proprietor, R. M. Haan:
Several days before the manage
ment of tho St. Regis granted per
mission to young women working
for the Irish Victory Loan Commit
tee of the Friends of Irish Freedom
to establish a booth in tho hotel.
Sheila O'Reilly, a flaxen-haired col
leen of sixteen,' and Mabel Clayton,
eighteen, placed a table In the lob
by, midway between Ihe desk and
the dining room. Thursday, Sir
Charles Allom, a frequent guest,
dropped In He is a member of the
firm of White, Allom & Co., artist
decorators, with offices in Fifty
second straat, just off Fifth avenue,
and a factory in West Fifty-second
street. Sir Charles leaned with his
back toward the hotel desk. His
gaze fell squarely on the poster,
headed: "The Irish Victory Drive
for the Freedom of Ireland."
Sir Charles strode to the table be
hind which sat Sheila O'Reilly and
Mabel Clayton
Sir Charles--What is this for?
Are you collecting funds for the
Irish rebellion?
Miss O'Reilly AVhy no; we are
collecting money for tho Irish Re
public. Sir Charles (white with anger)
I'm an Irishman, and you do not
know what you are talking about.
You are being led-by priests and the
clergy.
Sir Charle3 turned ana, whipping
the air with his cane, encountered
Joseph Haan, brother of the hotel
proprietor. The loud protest brought
tho proprietor from the dining room.
He became the target of tha conver
sation.
Sir Charles I object to that
crowd.
Proprietor Haan 'What right, Sir
Charles, have you to dictate to me
in my hotel? They are here for
a worthy purpose, ana at my invitation.
Husky hotel porters appeared
from all directions, waiters and wil
ling guests. Sir Charles was seized
by the scruff of the neck and a por
tion of the trousers. He was "lifted"
toward tho doorway. A reporter
called at Sir Charles' office. After
explaining his mission he was toloV
Sir Charles was out ana couia not
be seen for several days.
RETORTS TO VATICAN.
idi
KH1SI
ramii
Miss Mollle Lyons, of 414 East
Market street. New Albany, has
been spending the week visiting at
Indianapolis .
m M lammwPk I m 1
aaaaTSflRJniiLtflwlL t!
Do You
Realize
That You Can Really
Keep Your Kitchen Cool?
No matter how stuffy and hot
your kitchen seems you can reduce
the discomfort to a minimum in
the very hottest weather by
making our service really serve
you.
An Electric Fan will helpan
Electric Range will help still
more if you employ both you will find the kitchen as
comfortable as any other part of the house.
You install the tools we'll do the work. If you
haven't electric service use the coupon and take advan
tage of our low-cost housewiring proposition.
INQUIRY COUPON.
Leokvitte Gas as Electric Cewpaay:
Louisville Gas
Electric Co.
i wttfc
tow tmat toMMewiriac
Ixaorpormtcd.
Name
Address
311 West Chestnut Street
Telephone Main or City 2182.
HIBERNIANS.
What .They Have Been Doing
' the Past Week General
New Notes.
T Zfe3PyliyAWfTNifcgar-i S
Miss Mary Rose Shelley enter
tained informally Saturday after
noon in honor of Miss Inez Schmitt,
of "Washington.
MEXICAN RAND1TS.
The Ambassador of President Car-
trol of the press, will be divulged ranza declares that "the Government
to the American public, with the and people of Mexico consider as a
Mr, and Mrs. Flrank Pooley,
Parkview, had as guests the past
week Mr. and Mrs. Charles Pooley,
of Seymour, Ind.
Lawrence Hlnes, of St. Louis, is
spending his vacation visiting his
sisters, Misses Margaret and Kath
erlne Hlnes, In Jeffersonville.
Miss Marcaret Hanlon arrived
this week to be the guest of Miss
Helen McNair at the summer home
of her parents. Mr. and Mrs. 'W.
I. McNair, on the Manslick road.
There will be on division meet
ings this coming week.
County President John Hennessy
is getting quite a boom for Coun
cilman on the Democratic ticket.
Tho special assessment is due
sinco July 1 and should be paid at
once.
Division 3 postponed its regular
meeting last night because of the
holiday.
This year divisions will send only
one delegate each to the State con
ventions. Division 6 of Indianapolis appro
priated $100 for the Indiana Irish
Victory Fund.
IPennsylvania Hibernians will hold
their State convention at Atlantic
City on Tuesday, August 16.
Division 2 of Syracuse has gone
over the top 100 per cent in the
funds for the Friends of Irish Free
dom. By vJrtuo o their ofllco Presl-
dontfi r.P illtrlnf Ann nrJll V. . A t -. A ..
rry,a u,-nnt,n,t Proco viVilfMi friMYi I ... . """""" "i" "o utiefauiea
';,:r, X..:rT?;;nV,r,t9 w respective State conven-
Cerretti, Papal Uunder Secretary of, 0fnf ... .... . ,
State, returned from Paris Saturday. The Hibernian ball team is again
and made a full report at the Vat-. "edHn fr, flrst P'ac,e and some tall
lean on his mission to the Peace f5?uf Jb e xpected tomorrow when
Conference. Monsignor Cerretti had.the bys raeet th& K- ' C. club,
lengthy conversations with iPopel The national convention at San
Benedict and Cardinal Qasparri, Pa- Francisco will open with solemn
pal Secretary of State. Both con- high mass In St Mary's Cathedral,
gratulated him warmly on the sue- Archbishop Hanna will preach the
cess of his mission. The report sermon.
dealt with changes made in thel A monster mass meeting -was held
peace treaty regarding Catholic Sunday under the auspices of Dl
misslons in former German colonies vision 40 of New York City, for the
and the protection of their property. ' purpose of demanding recognition
He also reported on other questions, of the Irish Republic.
Including unofficial conversational Indianapolis (Hihernians met Sun
with members of the various peace ' day with the County Board, when a
delegations at Paris and discussions committee of 100 was named to at
there regarding the League of Na- range for the reception of President
tions. Monsignor Cerretti expressed de Valera on Tuesday.
tn "SSrtlSTri.. "sVnlXl e RWW ?' indian-
by members of American dele-1 tJTSSSt of loS
gatlon, some ii-MA ?n to greet President De Valera and
.J?? 5?MreJ?c '" Judge Cobalan at Tomllnson Halt
2AXt 0))CERTS7HnZiMiHlilBE$T VAVDEV1U&
3AHGING 3j!k?iB5WimWG POOL
H'iTSTJ'AVaJS.fnnrSarffimtfmi IKKTAHZSANirATtr
HWHlcU5?ClFCTERIA35XTRESTAVItAMT DE LVXE
a. : .----. , , . n v ..' i. - -
dOPEHN-W flUMIKViuLJC ;S Mfr S OpEI
EVERY. DAY " AnVSEtlEHT CENTER. EVERY NIQHT
the United States a number 9f years
ago
DOUBLE DEALING GEORGE.
spoke there Tuesday
possible result that greater enthus-
violation of Mexican sovereignty the
nrnanlnp rt TlnffoH Qtntoa anlrllpra In.
iasm ifor the Irish cause may be fn ,.-,. .,.,, TM, Pniara-
aroufed. The absurdity of Eng-Jtion "lias .been approved by the
land's oft-repeated assertion that the bandit chief. There is little, to
Trish question is a "domestic affair" sovereignty that can not deal with
L r ii ,.w.n.riTari kV oil fitr U handful of outlaws. What doea
fsnowbelngrecognized hy a fair-'the Chprlllsa Governnient want us
minded men. Spain s brutality in t do7 it certainly does not expect
Cuba was a "domestic anair" until
we convinced her that It wasn't.
EXPOSE THE JOKER.
Under many and varied pretexts
do the defenders of the Smith-
Towner bill seek to elude the charge can Ambassador speaks of Jnterna-
thfctthia measure establishes an edu- onai law. rnere is no quou oi
that we arc going to stand by and
allow a buach of Mexican bandits to
shoot into American homes. When
a man shoots into your home you
are going after him. You -will not
be so particular about the means,
particularly when the' murderer Is
sheltered by a neighbor. The Mexi-
iLouisvllle people registered in
New York last week wore Mrs.. R.
R. Ireland, Mr, and . Mrs. - O. H.
Irvine, Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Stokes.
T. Itobinson, A. W, Lieber, J. O.
Osborne and Joseph G. Rogers.
Miss Zada M. Fess and Frank L.
Fenweck, well known and popular
residents of New Albany were
quietly married Monday evening at
St. Mary's church. Rev. Father
Selbertz performing the ceremony.
Mrs. Emma Mattlngly and
grandchildren, Misses Louise, Mary
Tvinw ijtwI Pntrlola Hanlnn. left
Tuesdav for Wenuet6nsing, where
when they
night
In New Orleans the arrival of
President de Valera acted as a new
smuiirtnir nt. a mestlntr In London stimulus to tne .Ancient uraer,
ex-Premier Asquith said: "We are , n w f?S, lK.n5,i. m
engaged, and rightly and worthily '" to, ha the claims of this old
engaged in Paris at this moment est Christian civilized nation of the
In starting upon ah new era of self- earth recognized by the Peace Con
determined life for race and com- ference They have sent him a
munitles, none of them more gifted tolegran i of felicitation upon his
than the Irish, which, have been too & arrival and invlt ng him to
long denied the right and power """ " "" J um.u.
to control their own development) tjittivk prnvtn
and destiny. It should he an ob-l ST- PAUL'S PICNIC.
true LiKTUthatU TTbotld do The Committee of Arrangements
Insist upon the prompt fulfillment everything progressing nicely for a
of the pledge to give Ireland self recorB breaking crowd at the an
government. Asqulth's pronounce- nual outing to be given at RIvoli
ment has a significance for Lloyd- Park on Tueatoy. July 15, and are
George, which the latter can not l!Infftnt,,?anennUntw6tvt0,oS
ignore. It is equivalent to a notice that the guests on that day have
l'ir ;... V..r; .l.t.r -i, n. one great and glorious time. Amuse-
pScTt hSwbl taltaR thillt gu rt Jtanl ttat will appaal
Tri-State Consolidated Oil Company
An investment coupled with tremendous speculative
possibilities, because of the character of the men behind
Ten Producing Paying Oil Wells
Tri-State has a par of $ 1 .00. Capital, $ 1 ,000,000, no
personal liability and non-assessable. Over 1 00,000 shares
now held by nearly 200 shareholders.
200,000 Sharfls Offered at 50 Cints Per Share
Cash or partial payment plan. Write the under
writers for full informatton.
C. E LEE, Secretary,
CORPORATE SECURITIES COMPANY
Brokers and Dealers in Stocks, Bonds and"07l Shares.
115 S. Fourth S. Louisville, Ky,
Reference, Citizens' Union National Bank.
USE THE COUPON INVESTIGATE
CORPORATE SECURITIES CO.,
315 South Fourth Street, Louisville, Ky.
Gentlemen Please send me prospectus, maps and details re
garding Tri-State Consolidated Oil. Co. Shares.
Yours truly, ,
RECENT DEATHS.
John M. Meyer, beloved husband
of Margaret Meyer, and the oldest
member of St. Boniface church,
passed into eternal life Tuesday
evening. His funeral took place
Thursday morning.
i-uesuay 10? weiiuuiunBiuB, "'' i,as naUed tne oJa colorfl to the lu " UUH& u "'"
tney win pena cne summer m mast gnd wm nQl toierate any manJ
cottage. They will he Joined later
by Col. P. J. Hanlon
tlonal law
I A I . .al Iah, Inttnltiiil T4 1c
eational dictatorship at Washington. Jpta JneaUon bf seU-'preservi-Eseape
can not be thus secured. tjon an ctated by ordinary com
What the 'Federal Government mon sense, it the Carranza Govern
flMiaefM! the iFederal Government ment continuee, to show Its Inability
UUMao ...... . ... tn ni-ntwt tha border our Govern-
eontrol. and U Smltn-xowner am . . opied to teach It Kjwer. dwurtnter of Mr. and Mr:
plainly aim th Secretory of BWu- ft jaiutary losaon. JWMHam F. Keyer, and Capt. Au-
Frank X. Fust and bride, who
was Miss CJara Arnold, will return
next week from an extended East
ern honeymoon trip. Their mar
riage was solemnized with nuptial
high onass at St. George's cnurcn,
Rev. Father Welse performing the
ceremony. ,
The marriage , bf Mise Isabella
as skipper wio wouiu naui memi
down to serve his own. purposes. In
nthcr words. Llovd-Gebrge. can not
come back as boss, and
knows It,
'TRINITY'S MOONLIGHT.
In response to many requests
George Trinity Council. Y. M. I., will re
peat its moonlight excursion and
, has secured the elegant Steamer
Best St. Louis for a trip up the
river next Wednesday evening, the
boat to leave" the foot of Fourth
street at 8:15 o'clock. A six-piece
dance orchestra will furnish the
dancing music and refreshments
will be served. Tickets of admls-
LABOR CONGRESS (XHNG.
The Southrn Labor Congress,
which Is expected to bring many
people from, the Southern States,
will be In seselon In this city for
three days. September 13-16. This
will be the first time this body has gion gty cents and children under
met in ixmiiriHw,
Miss Helen Hochadel, daughter, of
the late Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Hocu-
adel, died after six weeks' illness at
her home, 2312 West Walnut street,
Wednesday morning. Three sisters,
Misses Annie and Elizabeth and Mrs,
George E., Glaser, survive her. Fu
neral services were held Friday
morning at St. Mary's church, at
tended by many mourning friends.
I 4
Leo Angormeier, twenty t nine,
years old, died Tuesday afternoon In
his home, 2314 West Market street,
of a complication of diseases. He
had been in Ill-health for some time,
and had been confined to his bed for
about two weeks. Deceased was one
of the best known young men or tne
West End and for a number of years
was a popular baseball player, He
Is survived by his mother, Mrs. Anna
Angermeier, and two brothers, Theo
dore and Albert Angermeier. Tho
funeral was held Thursday morning
from St. Anthony's church.
CHIROPRACTOR
CiStrecraetlb
KeBWTH
the Caoto
jXatarDe
wo umllag.
CoualUUm
and
Anlsl
XVm.
BHBHawaflBBanra
aBBBEBH&H',
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IOiM A. M.
C. B. Southeiiand
Mrs. Elizabeth . Biust, who Uvea
naar Nw Albany, on Tuesday re-
twelve years o age admitted free. solved a telegram aanouaclng the ( Laahlin, New York, survive him
death of- her son, George E. Mc
Laughlin, In his home near Helea
dale, Cal. Mr. McLaughlin, who was
forty-two years old, was born and
reared In New Albany. Fourteen
years' ago he moved to California,
where he operated a large stock and
grain ranch. His wife, a son, An
drew McLaughlin, his mother, and a
Bister, Mrs. Andrew Connell, New
Albany, and a brother, John Me-
J
o

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