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The Breckenridge news. (Cloverport, Ky.) 1876-1955, April 26, 1911, Image 1

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THE BRECKENRIDGE NEWS.
ALL THE NEWS THAT'S FIT TO PR.INT
VOL. XXXV CLOVERPORT, KENTUCKY. WliDM-SD AS , APRIL 26, 1911. 8 Pasit No. 42
DEATH COIES 10
MRS. SMITH BUCK
L
THE LORD'S PRAYER
I Rp&L I
Dies Friday At Irvine-Was Well Practical, Sensible Sermons De
Known In Breckenridge And livered By The Reverend Mr.
Perry Counties Just Fifty Brown-Mens' Prayer Meet
Years Of AgeLeaves Large ings Held This Week.
Family.
I ALL THE SERVICES GOOD
FUNERAL HELD SUNDAY.
Mrs. Elizabeth Mack, wife of Smith
Black, died at Irvine last Friday. Her
death was caused by cancer. She was
just fifty years of age and was born
near German Ridge, Ind. Her old home
was at Stephensport, where her friends
are many and she was well-known over
the county. Nine years ago Mr. Black
took her and their family to Irvine to
live. She was a christian woman, a
member of the Methodist church and
did much for her children, who were
devoted to her.
The funeral was held Sunday after
noon, conducted by the Rev. Mr.
Jackson and the interment took place at
Irvine.
Besides her husband she leaves three
daughters.Nell and Sue Black and Mrs.
Ollie Orr, of Fordsville; and four sons,
John, Henry, David and V. L. Black.
Mrs. Black was the daughter of Mrs.
Kathrine Plock, the, woman who .was
famous for her old age and beautiful
knitting. Her sisters are Mrs. Henry
Klelman, of Oriole, Ind.; Mrs. John
Clearwater, of Tell City, and her
brothers are Phil Plock, of Stephens
port, and Henry Plock, of Tell City.
COL. WALTON'S HAND
WRITING LIKE MUSIC.
Every once in a while sombody in
Stanford receives a letter from Col. V.
P. Walton, former editor of the Interior
Journal, and now associate editor of the
Lexington Herald. The recipients of
such missives usually bring them to us
to. read, for we "set" his copy for many
a year both by hand and on a linotype,
and often we were the only man in the
office who could read it. Which re
minds us of a story he told on himself
in the Herald the other day. A tramp
printer hit Lexington and they put him
on a machine to set some ot Mr. Wal
ton's editorials. The printer looked at
' it a while, turned It up-side down and
studied it then went to the foreman and
said: "If I had a cornet I might play
this stuff, but I'm d -d if I can set it. "
At that we think Col. Walton's chiro
graphy is more legible than that of
Editor Desha Breckinridge of the Her
ald or of Enoch Grehan another leading
Lexington newspaper man, and we
have "set" them all In days gone by.
Stanford Interior Journal.
Buys Home At Irvington.
Mr. and Mrs, Joe T. Mattingly have
bought the Kemper bungalow at Irving
ton. It Is now occupied by Mr. Chas.
Hook and family, who will vacate as
soon as they can get another house.
MISS CAIN WILL GO
TO FOREIGN FIELDS
Miss Beverley Cain, formerly of
Bewleyville, graduates at the Scarritt
Training School, Kansas City next
month. She will be consecrated as a
missionary at the council meeting in
St. Louis and will take orders .tor the
foreign mission Held.
Horace Smith Injured
Hawesville, Ky., April 32. -r Horace
Smith, of Lewlsport, who is one of the
best known and most extensive farm
ers and stock men in the county, sutl'er
ed a compound fracture of the right
arm near his home yesterday morning,
as the result of being kicked by a fine
horse. Mr. Smith was passing behind
the animal at the time, and yie in
jury was most unexpected.
May Go To Rome, Italy.
Miss Minnie Stith, a former Bewley
ville girl, is a most successful nurse in
Washington City. She is contemplat
ing a trip to Rome, Italy, in a profess
ional capacity, lnthe near future.
Mrs. Whiiehouse Still III
Mrs. Rosa Whitehouse has been ill
Fat her home for six weeks and her
'; friends will regret to learn that her
I condition shows little improvement.
The religious revival that nus been
In progress for several days at the
Methodist church under the direction
of the Rev. Mr. Frank Lewis and Mr.
Walter Brown, have stopped the "peo
ple of Cloverport stopped them at
least, a minute, a half hour, or an hour
or two each day and evening.
Every afternoon a woman's prayer
meeting Is held at two o'clock and fol
lowed by a regufar service at 2:45.
These services have been the sweetest,
and the most spiritual held here for
some time. Those who have been
hungry and thirsty for"food and drink1'
that the heart craves, have relished the
measureless benefits of these gather
in gs.
The men's prayer meetings are held
every morning at 8:30 o'clock in the
office of V. G. Babbage, and are being
well attended by the business men. The
thoughts and words, it is said, that
have fallen at these meetings, have
been as refreshing as drops of rain on
a hot day.
The evening services open at 7:15 o'
clock with a song service.
The sermons of the Rev. Mr. Brown
are logical, not sensational, and appeal
to practical people. He makes his
points plain and, drives them In the
minds and hearts of men, like a man
drives spikes in a railroad tie with a
sledge hammer.
The revival closes Sunday evening.
STEAIOAHAPTI
Of Old Days Asked About Friends
In Cloverport Remembers
Many Who Has Left The Port
For Good
Capt. Westfall, an old time river
man, and the best captain that ever
walked the deck of a steam boat, was
a passenger on a train Monday return
ing from a trip 011 the Tell City to
Evansville. He asked about all his
old friends, many of whom have passed
away, in Cloverport. That was twenty
three years ago but he still remembers
them. He is now Superintendent of
the Alms House in Louisville and is
just so faithful to do his duties there as
he was a steam boat man.
Tries To Enter The Home Of
Miss Drew Gregory Saturday
Night-Shoots At His Legs.
Miss Drew Gregory was awakened
about one o'clock Sunday morning by a
burglar who was trying to enter her
home in First street or the East Side.
He made attempts to get in the window
and Miss Gregory shot at his legs three
times. The burglar dropped his hat
and Chief DeHaven can possibly iden
tify it.
PREACHERS FEAST
Cloverport Folks Are Showering
Them With Invitations-More
Chicken Than They Can Eat.
The Rev. Mr. Lewis and the Rev.
Mr. Walter Brown have been extensive
ly entertained since the revival opened
at the Methodist church. They have
had more invitations than they can ac
cept and have taken them as they come.
Their list Is as follows: Mrs. Francis
Marion Smith, Mr. and Mrs. J. C.
Nolte, Mr. and Mrs. Wick Moorman,
Mr. and Mrs. Marlon Weatherhplt, Mr.
and Mrs. John A. Barry, Mr. and Mrs.
Hiram Moorman, Mr. and Mrs, John D.
Babbage, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Bowmer.
Sold Fine Hogs
Pierce Hardaway sold two Duroc
Jersey hogs Saturday; one to Julius
Slpple for 2$ and the other to Sam
j Rice for 37.
THE following beautiful composition was taken during the
Civil War. in Charleston, S. C, by a brother of Mrs. S.
R. Ilolmcr, of IveudalVllle, Ind. It Is printed on ver? kanvy
satin and is quite a literary curoslty:
THOU, to the Mercy Ssat our souls until
gHther ' ,
To do our duty tint Thee,
' OUR FATIIBU,
To whom alt pnisr. nil honor should I
given,
' For Tumi art the Great C.hI
WHO ART IN HUAVKN,
Thin, by Thy wisdom, rtil'st the world's
whole frame
Foiever, therefore,
HALLOWED BH THY NAME;
Let nevermore delays divide us from
Thy glorious grnce.'but let -
THY KINGDOM COME.
- Let Thy command , pposed by none,
Hut Toy Good plsasure and
THY WILL HE DONE,
Ami let our promptness to obey lie even
' The very same
ON EARTH AS 'TIS IN HEAVEN;
Then for our souls, 0 LORD, we nho
pray
Thou would'st be pleased to
GIVE US THIS DAY,
The food of life wherewith our souls tire
fed,
Sufficient raiment, and
OUR DAILY BREAD,
With every needful thing do Thou relieve
Aud, of Thy mer.'y, pity
AND FORGIVE US
All our misdeeds for Him, whom Thou
did'st please
To make an offering for
OUR TRESPASSES;
Aud for as much, O Lord, as we believe,
That Thou wilt pardon us
AS WE FORGIVE
Let that love teach wherewith Thou
dost acquaint us
To pardou all
THOSE WHO TRESPASS AGAINST US
And though sometimes Th u fitid'st we
have forgot
This love to Thee, yet help,
AND LEAD US NOT
Through soul or body's want to desper
atlon. Nor let earth's gain drive us
INTO TEMPTATION,
Let not the soul of any true believer
Fall into the time of trial,
BUT DELIVER
Ytta, save them from the malice ol the
devil
Aud, both in life aud death, keep
US FROM EVIL;
Thus pray we. Loul, for tint of Thee,
from whom
This may be had
FOR THINE IS THE KINGDOM;
This wold is full of Thy works, its
w.Mid.ous story,
To Thee belongs
THE I'OWER AND GLORY
t And all Thv Glorious works,
FOREVER, AMEN
This uuiiue nud lovely piece is set verbatim et literatim from
a clipping that Mr. Courtney Habboge, Sr., has bad twelve years
The last part uf it Was torn off and lost. Mr. Babbasje offered it
to us to be published during the Methodist Revival..
Cloverport, Ky., Ap.-il 26, 1011.
KETNUCKYPRESS
Will Hold Summer Meeting At
Cerulean Springs June Nine
teenth To Twenty-Third-Jack-son
And Estill Wanted Convention
At a meeting of a committee rep
resenting the Kentucky Press Asso
ciation, in the Leather Room of the
Seelbach Friday at uoon to select a
place for the annual meeting of the
Kentucky Press Association. Ceru
lean Springs was agreed upon and the
date set for June 10 to S3. Estill Spr
ings and Jackson, Breathitt county,
made efforts to land the convention.
H. Shinnlck, of Shelbyville, was
chairman of the meeting anil Shelton
Saulley,of the Stanford Journal, Secre
tary and Treasurer.
A SHOE-MAKER, A FIRE
MAN AND A FARMER.
Julius Sipppel, of Irvington, is a man
of three trades and works at all of them.
He has a night run oa the L, H. & St.
L. branch. He also owns and runs a
11500 form near Union Star.besldes Mr.
Slppel is a shoe maker and works at his
shop all day at Irvington.
FREEJERVICE
To Cumberland Subscribers All
Through Breckenridge County
-Manager Harvill Giving Pat
rons Best Attention
The extenslou ot free sesvice to sub
scri :ers of the Cumberland Telephone
Company Is highly satisfactory to the
patrons of Breckenridge county. Every
subscriber has free service to all points
in the county.
A. M, Harvill, Manager of the en
tire county exchange, has opened a
free service to the following places:
Harned, Glen Dean, McQuady. Ask
Ins and Union Star. v
Mr. Harvill is one of the best manag
ers the company has ever had here and
his untiring energy has accomplished
much for the town and rural patrons of
Breckenridge county.
If you have a telephone you can get
free connection with any place In the
county.
Wants To Be Lieutenant Governor
For a long time It looked like Mr.
James P. Edwards, of Louisville, would
be given a walkover for Lieutenant
Governor, but all of a sudden the posi
tion seems to have taken on an added
Importance for certala politicians.
king Powder
The Only Baking Powder Made from Royal
Grape Cream of Tartar.
Safeguards the food
against alum
Chemists tests have shown that a part ol the alum from
biscuit made with an alum bahlnrr powder passes Into
the stomach, and that dljcs!ton is retarded thereby.
Road tho lahof and mako sure that yotw baking
powder is not ma do from alum.
Hon T. B, Stuart of Winchester, is a
recoptlve candidate. So we believe is
Harry A. Sommers, of Klizabethtown,
and M. W. Smith, formerly United
States District Attorney of Western
Kentucky, has announced with a long
platform. There may be others and
still others with the bee b.issing in
their bonnets. Lexington Herald,
NOTICE
All those who are buying shoes at
Sippel's. please save your coupons for
Miss Esther Jackson, who is still anx
ious to win in the piano contest. Those
who have promised them to her, kindly
save them and notify her at once.
Honored In Washington. City At
The Unveiling Of The Marble
Bust Of Issac Shelby
Washington, April Si Mrs. Samuel
S. Watkins. who, before her marriage,
was Miss Rose liurwell Grilllth.of Ow
ensboro, ICy , is representing the Evan
Shelby chapter of the unveiling of the
marble bust of Governor Isaac Shelb3
She Is a great-grand-daughter of Isaac
Shelby.
Mrs Watkins was attired in black
lace over white silk, and she wore a
carved head of one of her ancestors
who lived in the sixteenth century.
Of Good Roads Society At Mc
Quady-Father Knue Eager
For All Members To Be Present
important plans will be taken up at
the quarterly meeting of the Good
Roads Society at McQuady at 3 p. m.,
Saturday, April SO. Father Knue Is
anxious that all members and those In
terested in good roads will be present
at the exact hour set.
LITTLE ADELE BENTON
Taken To Louisville For An
Operation-Became Critically
III Last Friday-Operated On
Monday.
Mr. and Mrs. D. C Benton took their
little daughter, Adele Benton, to Louis
ville Monday to be operated on at St.
Joseph's Infirmary. She has not been
well for several weeks and was taken
critically ill Friday. Dr. Simons said
the cause was intestinal trouble.
The operation took place Monday
afternoon and as the News goes to press
discouraging word has been received.
Buys Land
J. E. Munford sold to M. II. Ward 00
acres of laud oil his farm between Gus
ton aud Irvington for $33 per acre. No
Improvements. Mr. Ward will build
this spring.
IRVINGTON COLLEGE
T GAME
Opening Play Brings Defeat To
Hardinsburg Juniors At Irving
tonBoth Teams Did Good
Work-Winners Wear New
Uniforms
LITTLE DILLON ALWAYS SMILES
Irvington, Ky., April SI (Special)
Saturday afternoon tho proud college
bovs dressed in tneir new uniforms,
trotted out on the diamond full' :ou
iident of taking the first game of the
season from the Hardinsburg boys.
The game started off with fast snap
py playing on tho part of the student
players, who pulled oil a nice double
play in Hrst inning. The vl iting team
held themselves together,fougln fierce
ly aud only crossed the ruober bui one
time, up to the fifth inning, while the
home players already had live runs
ahead.
Hernd(.n's pitching proved a stum
bling block for the Hardinsburg team
until the sixth inning when he lost the
excellent control which he hud, allow
ing the visitors to hammer tho sphere
till they got in the lead; then they
were held steady by Harr,who relieved
Herudon.
The Hardlnsburgcrs were now great
ly encouraged, though the Irvington
boys were still in the game. Lee Hook
now relieved Hoben and with his ex
cellent curve held the Irvington bat
ters firm and steady. Although many
errors on both sides were made, the
game continued with great interest.
Little Dillon always wore 'a smile
and made some excellent plays, and all
the time kept encouraging his men.
M. Brown was a great back stop, but
became too excited and threw the ball
away several times for the other
boys. Tho out fielding of both teams
was spleudid, while the inllelding was
very strong. Each team got about the
same number of clean base hits, but
the Irvington boys were credited with
the most stolon bases. The batting
for the home boys was led by Lyon,
who made live hits out of six times at
bat, taking one triple, one double and
three singles. Lee Hook only mado one
hit and that was a long drive over in
center Held fence making a home run.
The winning score for Irvington was
made by Brashear after two men were
out. The Hardinsburg boys said they
got a square deal and wanted to play
the college boys again.
THE LINE UP
Hardinsburg Position Irvington
Brown M.
Hook L.
Macy G.
Brown V.
ShelmanN.
Dillon F.
Hoben II.
Marshal J.
Hoben W.
Catcher
llrd baso
Snd base
1st base .
C-field
S-stop
L-field
H-lield
Pitcher
Lyon H.
Gibson J.
Barr P.
Kirk H.
Cunnlugham
Parks H.
Brashear
Jolly J,
Ilerndon A.
Continued on page 8
Attends Funeral Of Uncle
Miss Lizzie Hall, of Webster, went
to West Point Friday to attend the
funeral of her uncle, M. V. Turuln,
who died at tho age of seventy four
years. He leaves a wife and four sons.

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