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The Breckenridge news. (Cloverport, Ky.) 1876-1955, November 26, 1919, Image 3

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NOVEMBER 26, 1910
THE BRECKENRIDGE NEWS CLOVERPORT, KENTUCKY
PAGE 3
REVIEW AND
OUTLOOK
Situation in Europe.
Europe, according to Sir George
Parish, is in a condition more appall
ing, more dangerous to civilation than
when the war was on. In an article
published in the London Contempor
ary Review, he sets forth the condi
tion of Continental Europe, and by
his statement of facts, pleads for
greater haste in the co-operation of
nations to overcome these conditions
which, he states are a menace to the
world.
Food production in France, Italy,
Germany and Austria-Hungary is
bout half the pre-war average Fuel is
equatly short. They can buy and pay
for these necessaries only by exports,
sale of securities, or credit. They have
no goods to export; France and Ger
many both lost their foreign securities
amounting in each case to about $7,
500,000,000, and the Central Powers
especially have no means of establish
ing credit. Unless these conditions are
met there must be a great death toll
by starvation this coming year.
No nation can live by itself alone,
and Sir George truly states that the
welfare of any country is closely in
tertwined with that of all others.
Hence the great problem, of civiliza
t'on is to be saved, is to keep these
suffering nations alive, whether they
be French, Italian or German. The
deseruction of any one people would
have serious consequences upon the
whole world. Unquestionably our own
prosperity is related to that of every
nation in Europe, including those with
whom we fought.
France and Italy, deeply in debt
and with paralyzed industries, are
waiting for reparations and indemni
ties from Germany and Austria with
which to rebuild their factories. But
this writer claims that such hopes are
a delusion, for Germany and Austria
are deprived of the means of getting
ny credit, without which they cannot
produce or pay. Meanwhile, France
and Italy sink deeper into the morass
of debt and suffering.
Great has been the loss of France.
Sir George holds that if it were possi
ble to rebuild the ruined factories and
wmk the mines , and farms, France
would soon be able to pay her way
Undoubtedly the hard working Ital
ian and German populations also
would soon be exporting goods to
pay for further advances if supplied
with the credit necessary to obtain
food and raw materials. Unless they
have this help, the consequences, he
holds will be appalling.
Financiers and statesmen may differ
as to the means and methods of help
ing them; they cannot, however, dis
agree with the statement of fact that
conditions now in Continental Furope
differ only in degree from those of
actual war. This fact, so ahiy proved,
drives home the point that "furtther
delay will be perilous." Wall Street
Journal.
FOR SALE!
Six room two story house on
lot 84x124 feet, five large shade
trees in yard, has cellar, front and
side porch, piped for gas in every
room, electric lights and electro
liers, house and all neccessary out
buildings including garage, in first
class condition. For further in
formation call or write
H. J. HAM MAN
CLOVERPORT, K Y
AMMONS
Miss Laura Nelson, of Amnions,
got the prize in the beauty contest
at the pie supper at Union Star, Sat
urday night.
Rev Jessie Curry, of Union Star,
filled his regular appointment at Am
nions, Sunday.
Mr. Milton Horsley was the guest
of Miss Jaunita Hickerson, Sunday
afternoon.
Mr. Henry Cuddy, of Union Star,
was the guest of Miss Ju'de Horsley,
Sunday afternoon.
Miss Rosie Barger spent Sunday
with Mrs Janie Balou.
Miss Beddie Bennett, of Union Star,
spent Sunday, here.
Mrs. Olla Robbins and daughter,
Miss . Hazel Robbins. were Sunday
guests of Mrs. Dallis Singleton.
Mr. Roland Morgan fell in the gar
bage can and hurt his foot.
Mr. Albert Poole and Miss Hattie
Balou, of Amnions, were married
Monday. Nov. 10, at Jeffersonville,
They will, spend the winter months in
Louisville.
Miss May Chappie, of Union Star,
was here Sunday afternoon visiting
Mrs. W. H. Dutschke.
Miss Guffie Nelson made a speech
Sunday for the benefit qf the 45 mil
lion campaign.
Mr. Jim Pete Mogran and wife, of
Addison, were guests Sunday of their
father, Mr. J. P. Morgan, here.
Miss Jaunita Hickerson was the
guest Saturday and Sunday of Miss
Goldia Stewart, at Union Star.
WHY THEY PARTED.
she
WANTED!
Salesman with Ford car, to devote
entire time to attractive nationally
advertised sales proposition. Ex
clusive territory and liberal com
mission.
Write or call in person for par
ticulars. FARM UTILITIES CO.
307 Keller Bid j. Louisville, Ky
He liked Wagner and Bach
preferred Irving Berlin and jazz.
He doted on Ibsen, Lord Dunsany
and Shakespelre; she was dippy over
revues and follies.
He wanted a few babies of his own
to adore; she preferred other people's
kiddies.
He liked to read and discuss H. G.
Wells. Joseph Conrad and Henry
James; she preferred Robert W.
Chambers. John Galsworthy and E.
Phillips Oppenheim.
He wanted to roam the fields and
woods; she insisted on doing her na
turing from a fast roadster.
He wanted to live in a rehabilitated
New England farm house; she simply
had to have a "Drive" apartment.
Cartoons Magazine.
USE RAT-SNAP.
Rats and mice are multiplying to an
alarming extent in Belgium becanse
of the scarcity of cats. As a result the
tinest kitten can be sold for a dollar.
From the December Popular Mec
hanics Magazine.
We will ship hogs from Hardins
burg, next Monday, December
1st 1919. Bring them, as we do
not know when we will ship
again. Must be here by 11 a. m.
BEARD BROTHERS
Hardinsburg, K.y.
Tobacco Growers
Our First Sale Will Be December 2
The Loose Leaf Tobacco Market opens December 1st, and
PRICES are going to be HIGH. The Eastern Markets
are much HIGHER than LAST YEAR, and the trend
points to GREATER PRICES.
We Predict $20.00 Being Ottered
By the Country Buyers For Good Pryor
Before December 1st
Why not WAIT a few days longer for the entry of the BIG
BUYERS on the market. Get the BENEFIT of their
COMPETITION on the Loose Leaf Floor.
We are READY to RECEIVE TOBACCO
beginning Wednesday, NOVEiMBER 26th
DON'T SELL BEFORE THE MARKET OPENS!
CLOVERPORT LOOSE LEAF TOBACCO WAREHOUSE
J. WALTER BOYLE. Manager
RABBITS GOOD ON
THANKSGIVING
May Take Turkey's Place.
Two Suggested Turkey
less Dinners.
To the Farmers
Of Breckinridge County
Fields Brothers Lose Leaf Floor opens next Thursday.
Big Floor with all the latest facilities of the Loose Leaf
Tobacco Sales Room.
We want tobacco from every farmer.
FIELDS BROTHERS & CO.
LOOSE LEAF FLOOR
T. O. Beatty,
Owensboro, Ky.
Why not serve a rabbit dinner in
stead of a turkey one oo Thanksgiv
ing Day? In many sections of the
country wild jackrabbits or the cot
tontails are plentiful; a good hunts
man has but to spend a few hours in
the country with his gun and return
with game bag overflowing. In some
localities Belgian or New Zealand
hares are raised on a commercial
scale, and city markets at this time of
the year usually have a good supply
of both the hares and game rabbits at
favorable prices.
Here are two suggested turkyless
dinners:
1
Fruit Cup
Smothered Rabbit with Dumplings
and Gravy, Glazed Sweet Potatoes,
Creamed Cauliflower or Salisfy
Cranberry Sauce Celery Hearts
Bread Butter
Tomato Jelly with Mayonnaise
Wafers
Ice cream and cake
Coffee
Salted Nuts
Cream of Oyster Soup
Fried Rabbit Brown Gravy
Mashed Potatoes
Buttered Turnips
Baked Corn Pudding V
Cranberry Jelly Celery
Hot Rolls Butter
Fruit Salad
Pumpkin Pie with Whipped Cream
Coffee
Nuts Rasins
The following recipes, tested in the
experimental kitchen of the ttpited
States Department of Agriculture,
show some of the attractive ways in
which either a rabbit or a hare can
be served.
Fricassee of Rabbit
Skin, draw, wash and cut rabbit
into pieces. Dredge with flour, salt
and pepper. Brown in 4 tablespoons of
fat. Change from frying pan to stew
pan, cover with boiling water, and
cook slowly until tender. Remove
meat front broth Thicken broth, al
lowing. 1 tablespoon of flour to 1 cup
of broth. Bring to the boiling point
and while still boiling add dumplings;
cover closely and allow to steam 13
to 20 minutes. Pour dumplings and
gravy over meat on hot serving plat
ter. Casssrol Rabbit.
8 slices bacon. 1 Urge rabbit or Bel
gian hare cut into pieces, 2 medium
sized potatoes, 2 small onions, 2 cups
hot water, 1 teaspoon salt, tea
spoon pepper.
Fry the bacon until light brown and
remove from the fat. Use this bacon
fat to brown the rabbit, which has
been dipped in flour. Arrange in cas
serole dish, the pieces of rabbit, the
strips of bacon, and sliced onions
and potatoes, and dredge lightly with
flour. Pour water over all. Cover and
cook slowly 2 hours.
Rabbit in Tomato Sauce.
2 tablespoons lard or butter, Vt
cups tomatto pulp or juice. 1 large
onion chopped fine, 3 tablespoons
flour, 2 teaspoons salt. l2 teaspoon
pepper, 2 cups water, 1 large rabbit.
Skin, clean, and wash and cut the
rabbit into pieces at the points. Dip in
flour and brown in a little fat.
Put the lard or butter in a deep iron
skillet or a roasting pan, and stir in
the flour. Add the chopped onion and
the tomato juice with the seasonings
and the boiling water and cook for 5
minutes. When this is boiling put in
the browned rabbit. Cover and let
simmer on top of the stove or in the
oven for one hour.
HERE'S A PUMPKIN PIE
THAT NEEDS NO SUGAR.
SOLDIERS HEMLET CONVERT
ED INTO LIGHTING FIXTURE.
The "tin hat" presented by the
grateful government to every return
ing fighting man is sometimes a cum
bersome souvenir. It can't be pasted
in the family album, and it 'ooks'out
of place on the parlor mantel. It does
make a satisfactory indirect-lighting
fixture, however, when equipped with
accessories described with illustration
in the December Popular Mechanic
Magazine.
Pumpkin and squash are in sea
son. This pumpkin pie is up to date
at this time of sugar scarcity because
it uses no sugar:
2 cups pie squash or pumpkin (stewed
and strained.)
Yi cup molasses
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon ginger
Yi teaspoon salt
2 eggs
2 cups rich milk
Mix the pumpkin, molasses, cin
namon, ginger, and salt. Beat the
eggs slightly and add them and the
milk to the mixture. Bake the mixture
in one crust until it is firm.
SUBSCRIBE FOR THE NEWS
II Perfect Lenses I
Imperfect Eyes j
Do you know that M per cent of all Headaches come j
from refective vision.
If you have the slightest symptom of eye strain consult j
an optonietist at once. j
i ( i , ii r L ii ........ t ........ i - 1 f - '
i Mr. yj. i i ,ii iiti ui iiic i i.u m i 'm .11 v.winyaiij' -m uvwr
l ville, will be at Wedding's Rrug Store Tuesday, Wednes- j
II day, Thursday and Friday, November 25-26-27 and 28, h
j Prepared to do Optical work at reasonable prices

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