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The Breckenridge news. (Cloverport, Ky.) 1876-1955, September 01, 1920, Image 1

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THE BRECKENK1DGE NEWS.
$2.00 a Year; $1.00 for Six Months; 50c for Three Months
ALL THE NEWS THAT'S FIT TO PRINT.
$2.00 a Year; $1.00 for Six Months; 50c for Three Months
VOL XLV
8.
CLOVERPORT, KENTUCKY, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 1920
8 Pages
No. 10
I
1'
B '
0,
B. iP S. OPENS
MONDAY, SEPT. 7
Attractive Booklets in Interest
of County School Just Issued
School Offers Two Courses
of Study.
Booklets announcing the faculty
and giving desired information con
cerning the Breckinridge County
High school at Hardinsburg are right
off press from the print shop of The
Breckenridge News. These booklets
are to be used in securing prospective
pupils for the school this year, and
the data for them was compiled by
g the County School Superintendent,
J. Raleigh Meador
The Breckinridge County High
School now meets all the require
ments of a first class county high
school. It offers a four years classical
course and the Smith-Hughes course
of four years which gives Vocational
Agriculture, has .a library equipped
with TOO volumes of books, a splendid
faculty and a ltvely Parent-Teachers
Association.
One big event in this schoolastic
year will be the School-Agriculture
Fair, which is announced for Satur
day, November 13. Pupils from all
over the county are to take pari in
the fair, and especially in the exhibits
of agricultural products, various forms
of school work, etc., for which prem
iums will be offered.
The school opens September 7.
MISS GIVENS COMES
WELL RECOMMENDED.
Miss Lucile Givens, who resides
with her uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs.
A. G. Rowe, -at 123G West Chestnut
street will leave tomorrow morning
for Cloverport, Ky where she has I
accepted a position as teacher in the
Cloverport graded school. Miss Giv-
ens nas Deen attending me western
Kentucky State Normal school, where
she made a splendid record and was
highly recommended by this institu-j
tion to the Cloverport school. She
has many friends in this cjty who
wish her success and happiness in
her new place. She is one of the
prettiest, most attractive and bright- j
est young women in the city. Daily
News, Bowling Green, Ivy.
MARRIAGE LICENSE
ISSUED IN AUGUST.
Marriage licenses issued in Breck
inridge county during the month of
August were for the following: Tal
make Gordon Cox to Stella M. Ben
nett; Gabel Pruit to Sylvia Nichols;
oscie Miiieus to Bettie Hall, bamuel
S. Sturgeon to Sallie Stillwell; Perry
A. Kiner to Victoria Bell Sermon;
James Hockman to Esther Cathlem
Webb; Percy Voyles to Mary Hall;
Gabe W, Sandage to Dora Still, and
Ephus Emery to Pearl Fluner.
FIRST VISIT TO COUNTY
IN FIFTEEN YEARS.
Mrs Ella Meyers, who formerjy
lived in Breckinridge county, is in
Stephensport the guest of her brother,
Mr. Roland Smith, and Mrs. Smith.
Mrs. Meyers resided in Chillicothe,
Mo., and is the matron in the Indus
trial Home for Girls, where 250 girls
are registered. This is Mrs. Meyers'
first visit to her home in fifteen years
and it is a happy ocasion for her.
H'BURG PARENT-TEACHERS
ASS'N TO MEET THURSDAY.
There is to be a special meeting of
the Hardinsburg Parent-Teachers As
sociation held in the Court House on
Thursday afternoon of this week at
4 o'clock. Members of the Association
are urged to be present.
-RETURN TO NEVADA.
Hardinsburg, Aug. 28. (Special)
Mrs. D; S. Maysey and little daughter,
Anna Hardin Maysey, of Reno, Nev
ada, have returned to their home after
spending the summer with Mrs. May
sey's parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. G.
Whitfield, of this place. Mrs. May
sey and daughter were accompanied
by the former's sister, Miss Minnie
Whitfield.
Service
We have many phases of service but
only one purpose: To develop a re
lationship that is broadly Helpful.
Our five departments Render thorough
and efficient service on all transactions.
Comerioal Banking Trust Business
Savings Department Safety Deposit Boxes
Foreign Exohange
Member of Federal Reserve System.
We Sell American Bankers Association trav
elers Checks.
Lincoln Savings Bank & Trust Co.
Maritt at Fourth
Louisville, Kentucky
TOMATOES ON ONE
VINE AVERAGE ONE
AND HALF LBS. EACH.
Ten tomatoes growing on one
plant and averaging 1 1-2 lbs.
each, is the proud record Mr.
Wood Wcathcrholt, of Tobins
port, has for his gardening this
summer. Mr. Wcathcrholt ex
perimented by cultivating this
one plant out of his crop. He
trclliscd the vines and watered
the roots during the dry spells,
and these large tomatoes were
the fruits of his labor. One to
mato weighed 2 1-4 lbs. They arc
the "Trophy" variety.
1ST. DIVISION ON
RECRUITING TRIP
Members of Famous "Fighting
First" Camp in C'port Two
Days Enroute to Daviess
County Fair.
One hundred and forty soldiers with
eighty-five horses, several trucks and
alltheir camping paraphernaliar march
er through Cloverport, Tuesday morn
ing about ten o'clock and on down
to Oglesby's grove where they pitch
ed their tents and will spend two days
at this point.
The outfit includes members of the
famous 1st Division, who were known
overseas as the "Fighting First." They
are in command of Capt. Holmes and
are out on recruiting trip from Camp
Taylor. From here they will go to
Owensboro to be there next week for
the Daviess County Fair then return
to camp.
The "Fighting First" has an inter
esting history. They were considered
the best trained men in the A. E. F.
and were the first to go overseas and
the last to return home. Three thous
and of their men paid the supreme
sacrifice and nearly all of the sur
viving ones came home wearing the
French War Crosse decorations for
gallantry and bravery.
The recruiting outfit came here
from Hardinsburg. They are making
the trip by land.
TWO IRVINGTON WOMEN
APPOINTED TO A MEETING
IN SALT LAKE CITY.
Frankfort, Ky., Aug. 27. Governor
Morrow today appointed delegates to
The Farm Women's National Con
gress which meets in Salt Lake City,
Utah, September 7 to 9. Miss Eliza
beth, Pepper. Miss Christine Rey
nolds, Frankfort; Mrs. James Gar
rett, Pisgah, Mrs. S. T. H'enning,
Shelbyville; Miss Lillian Headley,
Miss Mary E. Sweeny, Miss Sun
shine Sweeny, Lexington; Mrs. C. L.
Chamberlain, Mrs. Lucy F. Herron,
Irvington; Mrs. Mary A. Howard,
"Henderson, and Mrs. Thomas H.
Clay, Paris.
MISS FERRY OPERATED
ON FOR APPENDICITIS.
While visiting in Fort Springs, W
Va., Miss Annie Murray Ferry, daugh
ter, of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Ferry, of
Louisville, was stricken with appendi-
' citis on Friday and underwent an
operation Sunday at a hospital in
Hinton. W. Va.
When Miss Ferry's parents re
ceived the message of her illness they
left Louisville immediately and were
j with her! at the" time of the operation.
I ane is reported 10 ue improving.
I
ST. ANTHONY'S MISSION
BEGINS SUNDAY, SEPT. 5.
Yellow Lake, Aug. 31. (Special)
Rev. Father Joseph Odendahl an-
, nounced Sunday that his Mission at
S"t. Anthony's church, Axtel, would
, begin Sunday morning Sept. 5. Rev.
Father Andrew, of Cincinnati, of the
' Franciscary Order, who is known to
be a very able speaker will preside
at the Mission. Services will be held
1 at 9 a. in. and 7. p. m.
ORDAINED A BAP-
TIST MINISTER
Byron C. S. Dejarnette Takes
Vows For Ministry in Hard-
insbug Baptist Church.
School-mate Delivers
Ordination Sermon.
Mr. Byron C. S. Dejarnette, son
of Mr. and Mrs. S. T. Dejarnette, of
Hardinsburg, was ordained into the
Baptist ministry at the Baptist church
in Hardinsburg, Sunday Mr. Dejar
nette took the examination for the
ministry Sunday morning under his
pastor, Rev. E. B. English and he
stood very high in the knowledge of
the faith and doctrine of his church.
Two of Mr. Dejarnette's school
mates were present for the ordina
tion, Rev. Adams, of Bardstown, and
Rev. Martin, of Owensboro. Rev.
Adams delivered the ordination ser
mon on Sunday afternoon and Rev.
Adams preached in the evening.
Mr. Dejarnette will begin his sec
ond year in Georgetown College this
fall and after graduating from there
he will go to the Southern Baptist
Theological Seminary in Louisville
He is in his twentieth year.
Mr. Dejarnette is president of the
Boys Conference in Breckinridge
county and was in Cloverport in Aug
ust and presided at the Boys and
Girls Summer Conference. He has
been doing supply work among the
Baptist 'churches in the county dur
ing his vacation.
BRIDGE PLANS
REJECTED TWICE
Engineer Friel States Third
Plan For Cloverport Bridye
Has Been Accepted by
Government.
Engineer F. W. Freil, who is with
the survey party for the Federal
Highway which is now located at
Danville surveying a route from
Richmond to Hickman known as the
Central route, was in Cloverport, Sat
urday. In speaking of the Federal High
way through Breckinridge county, Mr.
Friel made the statement that the
delay in letting the contract for this
county was due to the fact that the
plans for the Cloverport bridge had
been rejected twice. He said three
plans' for a bridge over Clover Creek
had been submitted but on account
of the depth of the foundation the
government wouldn't approve the
first two plans, but the third one has
been approved The last plan is said
to be for a three arch concrete span
of special design, and something new
in the way of bridge building.
Mr. Friel added he thought the con
tract for Breckinridge county would
be let within the next thirty days.
BRIEF LOCAL ITEMS
Although he lives winthin twenty
miles of Cloverport and in the same
county, Mr. S. A. Davis, of Woodrow
made his first visit here in thirty
years when he came Saturday to at
tend the M. W. U. barbecue. Mr.
Davis was the guest of Mr. and Mrs.
Roscoe Davis, of the East End
o
The city of-Cloverport had a regular
fall house cleaning last week. Cart
load after cart load of rubbish was
carried off by local teamsters and
used for filling up sink holes on the
river banks. So eager were the team
sters to get everything out of the
way that they hauled off a pile of
cinders which a resident on the Hill
had just purchased for building a
walk and had the pile near his front
pavement.
The vacant lots about town were
rid of the underbrush, and consider
able amount of good work was ac
complished by the city council.
o
During the past week many visitor's
been attracted to the homes of Mr.
Leon McGavock and Misses Eva and
Eliza May to see the night-blooming
Cercus plants in all their glory. Each
of the plants had ten and twelye
flowers on them and they were mar
velous in their perfectness and fra
grance, o
Mr. Hardin Kinder, who for more
than twenty-five years has been haul
ing freight and express in this city,
is taking a vacation in having a
change of work He is hauling coal
from the Hancock county mines. Mr.
Kinder's absence off the freight wag
.on is exceptionally noticeable. lie
is blessed with good health and does
n't mind any" kind of weather hence
he has hardly missed a day from his
work. His son, Roscoe, is taking his
place.
Rev. Father J. F. Knue, of Mc
Quady, Mr Jas. Dean, of Glen
Dean, Moorman Ditto and A. T.
Beard, of Hardinsburg, were noted
among the visitors from over the
county who attended the M. W. A.
picnic, Saturday,
PRODUCING ALL RIGHT
"Fixing, your car?" asked the pass
erby as a grimp man crawled out
fr,om under an automobile.
"Nol" responded the grimy one
with a withering 16ok, "merely
dabbling in oil." Judge,
M. W. A. BARBECUE
DRAWS BIG CROWD
Estimated Nearly 2000 People
Attend; Jas. Frank, Holt,
Draws $1,000 Chevrolet Car
PRIZE WINNERS.
Saturday, Cloverport was the scene
for another barbecue, the first one
since the days of the celebrated Ma
sonic barbecues and those given by
the St. Rose church, which has been
about five years ago. This year mem
bers of the local order of the Modern
Woodman of America gave their
initial barbecue, and while the crowd
didn't equal the ones of previous bar
becues, it was estimated that there
were from fifteen hundred to two
thousand people here.
There were visitors from all sec
tions of the county, and from parts of
Hancock, Meade and adjoining coun
ties, who made it a home-coming
event.
Local members of the M. W. A.
were the Committeemen in charge
of the affair of the day, and the festi
vities begun about the noon hour
when the barbecued dinner was ser
ved and continued throughout the
afternoon and long into the late even
ing Arnold's Military band was on
the grounds furnishing the music for
the dance pavillion which was the
popular resort for the younger folks.
In the afternoon the prizes were
disposed of to the lucky ones. The
giving away of the $1,000 Chevrolet
car created the most interest. Alone
i about 5:30 the last chance was sold.
I the box where the lucky number was
to be drawn from, was thoroughly
shaken, and little Miss Eleanor Mar
tin, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. C.
Martin, this city, was blindfolded and
drew the number DIM. The one hold
ing the duplicate number was James
Thomas Frank, of Holt. He had
bought the ticket late that afternoon.
Chances were sold on one hundred
pounds of granulated sugar, but the
owner has never been located.
Fiddlers Contest, prize $2 knife,
Ward Galloway.
Finest couple on ground, prizes,
umbrella and necktie to Miss Betilah
Beavin and Heron Jones.
Girl throwing contest, prize fl' yds.
gingham. Alberta Pate.
Largest woman on ground, 5 pounds
sugar, Mrs. L. Keenan.
Prize Winners.
Prizes awarded were:
$1,00 Chevrolet car won by Jimmie
Frank, of Holt, who held the lucky
number.
Prettiest baby under 2 years, gold
ring won by Geo. Powell. Jr., son of
Mr and Mrs. Geo. Powell.
Prettiest baby under 1 year, gold
necklace won by Mildred Bernice Par
don, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Burl
Parson and granddaughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Nat Tucker.
Selling most dinner tickets, 1st
prize Viola Beatty; second prize, $2.50
Corine Quiggins.
WILL BE A LATIN IN
STRUCTOR IN HIGH SCHOOL
Miss Tula D. Babbage, who was in
Bowling Green this s'utnmer special
izing in a Latin course at the State
Normal School, leaves Thursday for
Rockwood. Tcnn., where she has a
position in the Rockwood High
School as a. Latin instructor. Miss
Babbage taught Latin in the Clover
port High School in addition to teach
the primary grades, and she is deemed
an adept Latin scholar.
CHICAGO VISITOR HERE.
Mrs. Ruth Collins, of Chicago is
in the county visiting her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. John L. Rhodes, of
Addison, and sister Mrs. N. H. Quig
gins, of this city. Mrs. Collins ex
pects to be here until October 1,
when t e will go to Evansville and
from there through the southern part
of Indiana and Illinois on a prospect
trjp for purchasing land.
FREEZING FRUIT LATEST
METHOD OF PRESERVA
TION FOR WINTER USE.
That the utilization of freezing stor
age for the preservation of berries,
other small fruits, and tomatoes could
be profitably extended is the belief of
specialists of the Bureau of Markets,
United States Department of Agri
curturc. Many ice cream manufactur
ers and canners would be benefited by
adopting practicable methods of hold
ing such products for manofacturiug
purposes, say the specialists.
It is pointed out that the preserva
tion of fruits by freezing is cheaper
than canning them, especially when
tin containers are scarce and costly
as at present; and that the frozen
fruit, held at the proper temperatures,
has a more natural flavor than canned
or dried fruit. The experimenters
found fruit preserved by freezing to
be fully as satisfactory as fresh fruit
and superior to canned or dried fruit
for use in making ice creams and slier
berts, and for cooking into pies, pre
serves, jellies and other desserts and
confections. The frozen fruits after
thawing are not well suited for eating
alone in a raw state, but are consid
ered very platable wheueaten before
thy have completely thawed. When
used as ingredients for desserts and
confections best results will be ob
tained if they are combined before
they are free from ice.
8 FEET 6 INCHES TALL
AND WEARS 24 SHOE
Arriving on board the Olympic
at New York City, Wednesday,
was a man by the name of Eu
gene Arcean from Europe. Ar
cean was in the steerage and
he was so tall he had to sleep
in an isle. He towers eight
feet six inches and wears 21 shoe.
A match for him was Miss
Gcrty Mills, eight feet one inch
tall. They were a party of cir
cus performers on their way to
join a circus in the West.
92 TEACHERS EN
ROLLED MONDAY
County Institute Opened With
Good Attendance ; Prof. Bak
er and Dr. Carr Address
First Session.
The Teachers Institute convened
at Hardinsburg on Monday morning
with an. enrollment of 92.
Miss Coral Whittinghill was elected
secretary of the institute.
Prof. Geo. M. Baker, of the State
University, who will have charge of j
the work for the entire week, gave a .
short outline of his idea of what an
institute should be. and the part the '
teacher should take in the institute.
Dr. John W. Carr. Director of
Physical Education for Kentucky, I
had the principal part in the program I
for the afternoon. The question of
sanitation, in both school and home,
was stressed and plans given by
which the teacher may assist in in
troducing a health program in each
community.
Setting-up exercises for pupils of
all ages were given and teachers urg
ed to give the work in the school.
State Superintendent Geo, M. Col
vin is expected to be in attendance
Wednesday.
A number of musical numbers will
be presented during the week by local
talent. Among the nuinb.crs already
arranged are a violin solo by Miss
Virginia Beard, vocal solo by Mrs.'
R. R. Compton, a duette by Misses
Mary Larue and Eula Beard, and a
piano duette by Misses Genevieve
and Grace Brown. j
Miss Nannie Kincheloc is at the
piano for the choruses of the week, j
DEATH RESULT OF
INFLUENZA ILLNESS
Lillian Katherine Suters Buried in
Tobinsport.
Miss Lillian Katherine Suters,
daughter of Mrs. Lum McCoy, whose
home is on the Hill, died Thursday
of tubercular trouble caused from in
fluenza. She had been sick practically
all summer. Her remains were taken
to Tobinsport. Fridav aftcrnbon i
where the funeral service was held
in the Tobinsport cemetery.
Miss Suters was born October 110,
l'.iO.'i, and her father was the late Geo.
Suters, of Indiana.
MISS WROE TO TEACH
IN A SOUTHERN SCHOOL.
Miss Margaret Wroe left Tuesday
for Toccoa, G where she will be en
gaged this winter as an instructor in
Mathematics in the Toccoa
Puclic School where her brother,
Mr. Edmund Wroe is superintendent
Miss Wroe taught in the Cloverport i
Public School for several years and
....i- i..i. ....... :i ...t i
was iiujJlliat uuiu uiiiuhk iiijiiia aim
patrons. .
A COLD PROPOSITION.
Our idea of zero in advertising is
the Inu'.i undertaker who advertised
his profession on palm-leaf fans, in the1
churches Lawrence CKans.') Gazette
-aa
Bank of
Hardinsburg
Trust Co.
HARDINSBURG, KY.
4'
O ON TIME
AJ DEPOSITS
6 SOWINGS
BIG ATTENDANCE
AT ASSOCIATION
About 800 Messengers and Vis
itors Meet at Macedonia
Church in Co. Baptist Ass'n
The Breckinridge Baptist Associa
tion, which met with the Macedonia
Baptist church near Rockvale, on Wed
nesday and Thursday of last week,
was attended by seven or eight hun
dred messengers and visitors from
Breckinridge and adjoining counties.
The weather was ideal for the oc
casion, and harmony good will and
enthusiasm marked the sessions from
start to finish.
On both days, basket dinners were
served on the grounds near the church
and they were all that couM be de
sired. The dinners were served in
the good old fashioned Kentucky
style, which is enough said.
Rev English Opened Meeting.
The Association was called to order
by Rev. Harvey English, Moderator,
of Amnions, on Wednesday morn
ing. Rev. English's brother, Rev.
Everett English, of Hardinsburg, de
livered the introductory sermon.
Among the other ministers who ad
dressed the meeting were Rev. J. P.
Jenkins, a representative of the State
Board of Missions, Louisville; Rev.
E. C. Nail, Cloverport; Rev. Flynt,
of Owensboro, pastor of the Steph
ensport Baptist church. Rev Russell
Walker, of Hartford: and Rev. Lloyd
pastor of the Macedonia church.
Rev. Walker, who was the former
pastor ot the Stephensport church,
delivered a splendid sermon before
the association on Thursday afternoon
at the out-of-doors meeting.
Reports Encouraging.
There arc nineteen churches in the
Association and the reports from
each one were very encouraging. The
total of the budget for the year show
ed ?8,000 expended by the association
including the amount raised for the
?." million campaign.
Four churches extended invitations
to the association for the annual
meeting next year, but the place for
meeting was not decided upon.
Officers for the ensuing year were
all re-elected and include: Rev. Har
vey English. Moderator; Mr. Joe
Fitch, assistant moderator; W. C.
Moorman, secretary; Rev. Everette
English, treasurer.
M. W. U. Session.
While the Woman's Missionary"
Union meets at the same time of the
association yet the meetings are held
separate and there was a good at
tendance of M W. U. members from
over the county.
Mrs. Everett English, Superinten
dent presided at the meetings.
The women gave $U,077.0j during
the year The officers for next year
were re-elected. They are: Mrs Eng
lish. Superintendent; Mrs, R. B. Mc
Glotlilau. assistant Superintendent;
Mrs. J T Jones, press reporter; Mrs.
F. C. Ferry, secretary and treasurer.
DR.- FRYMIRE INJURED
BY DISCHARGED PISTOL.
Frymire. Aug :iO. (Special) Dr. J.
B Frymire, an aged citizen of this
place, was painfully hurt several days
ago while handling a pistol. The pis
tol fell from Dr. Frymire's hands and
hit the floor causing it to discharge.
A bullet passed through the physi
cians ankle and broke a large bone.
Dr. W. L. Milner, of Union Star, and
Dr. Kincheloc attended Dr. Frymire.
CLOVERPORT TEACHERS
ATTENDING INSTITUTE.
The teachers from Cloverport who
are attending the County Institute
held in Hardinsburg this week are:
Mrs. J. R Randolph, Misses Elsie
May, Lillian May, Gladys Hemphill,
Christine Ballman, Lillian Buckby,
Mr. Joseph Ballman, and Miss Givens,
of Bowling Green.
THRIFT
DESERVES
REWARD
This Bank feels that the
thrifty prudent saver de
serves the highest percent
age of interest that can be
paid, compatible with
sound banking principles.
We can pay you 4 per
cent, on your savings and
time deposits and feel we
should do so as long as fi
nancial conditions are
what they are.
We solicit your patron
age, offering friendly in
terested service.
,t
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