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Hopkinsville Kentuckian. [volume] (Hopkinsville, Ky.) 1889-1918, March 07, 1918, Image 1

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CKIAN
SVILLE
ill!
HOPKINSVILLE KENTUCKY, THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 1918.
VoL 40. No. 29
Weather for Kentucky Thursday, much colder.
MIOSIM. CKffl
JUST A NEWSPAPER CUT.
(By "Chink Richmond.)
I m a man push hl way through
the lines
Of ops whera the work of tha "Are
ftend" shines.
"The chief!" I Inquired, but a fire
c man replies:
"Ge, no. Why, thaft oaa of thoaa
newspaper guya-"
I aaa a man walk through tha door of
a show,
Wbera great throngs ara blocked oy
tha signs "S. R. O."
"la thia man tha star that no ticket
buya?" . .w
'"Star, nothing. of tnoM
newspaper guya."
I see a man start on a trail of a
Ha acorns tha police but ha brings
him to book.
"Sherlock Ilolmeer I inquire. Soma-
"Sherlock hell No, he's one of those
newspaper gnysi
I see a man ait in a seat of the
great.
And they ask his advice upon matters
ofaUte.
"A diplomat surely" but, to my
They tell ma he'a one of thoso news-
.... wsW ffTIVt "
And aoma day I will etand by the
great gates or goia
, And see m man pass through un
nwmA and kola.
"A Saintr 111 ask, and PetcrMl re-
ply:
"No, he's only a plain, honest news
paper guy.
Japan has promised to get busy
and that means a gTeai uei.
Senator James, who has been ill
jfo weeks, will be able to resume his
worn n
tw. tut of killed and wound
ed- at Toul March 1, eontaina among
the slightly wounded Clarence
Hill, of Middlesboro, Ky.
The Wisconsin Legislature la about
to fail in an effort to pass reso
lution censuring Senator Lrouen
. A vote will hardly be reached.
' -.. nmrfv I developing in Rua-
aial that may force the resignations
of Lenine and Trotsky, who aigned
the humiliating peace witn Kussia.
tk. nl adjournment of the Leg
' ui.tnr. will take place on the night
"of March 20. Two sessions are now
being held daily.
It ia by no mean certain that
the'eongress of Soviets at Moscow
. March 12 will ratify the peace by
whicn tfussia is w n.. j
... - . thin
a "piece oi termor vbi
Germany.
Miss Beulah Lambert, daughter of
' the former mayor of Owenaboro, is
" now a graduated aviatrix from the
t Curtia Aerial School at Buffalo. She
) it the first Kentucky girl to attain
this honor.
Once more the women voters have
helped the President by breaking the
tie in tha House and giving the
Democrata control. Their votes
elected Democrats to fill four vacan
' ciea in New York city districts.
That well-informed newspaper
t man Harry Sommera, of the Elisa
bethtown News, doea the state of
MonUna the injustice of saying it
is represented by Senator Chamber
lain. Oregon is responsible for him.
The trial of MaJ. Milton Board,
v accused of neglecting a soldier at
Camp Zachary Taylor, who luter
died, was postponed Tuesday until
- C,.jrsday that important witnesses
may testify.
Twenty-nlna young womea speak
's ing both French and English hava
been recruited for telephone oper
ators in Franca in connection with
s tha Signal Corps. They will aail in
tha near future.
Germans captured by Americans
' gave a good deal of information and
' admitted that Germany would in tha
end lose. They said they did not
I tvant to fight but had to and that
4hey were glad to be prisoners in the
handa of tha Americana, as they
. believed they would be treated welL
Tha two housea of Congress have
split the difference on tie railroad
control bill. A tentative agree
ment ta limit Government control
of railroads to twenty-one months
after peace ia declared, instead of
m two years, as proposed by the House
j and eighteen months by the senate,
' ws reached.
BUS ESS
BOOS
Farmers Carrying Home Fat
Checks For Tobacco Sold
Banks Get Deposits. .
ENJOYING LARGE TRADE
Bayers Riding In Country
Looking For Special
Types.
Yesterday was tha biggest tobac
co sale of tha aeaaon on the Hopkina
ville market. Tha exact figures were
not obtainable at the time of going
to presa but those who are best
able to judge estimated yesterday's
sales as amounting to over a half
million pounds. Most of the loose
floors worked lata into tha night
Thursday unloading tha wagona that
were packed in long rows waiting
their turn.
Prices still rule strong, especially
on the better gradei . The poorer
grades have not ruled so strong the
past few days. Indications are that
a better grade of t"bacco ia being
offered now than at any time this
season The higher prices are due
partly to this fact However, pricea
have advanced $1.60 to $2.00 dur
ing the past three weeks.
A considerable quantity of wet
and damaged tobacco continuea to be
offered for 'sale and in every in
stance tobacco in thia condition
brings from $1.00 to $3.00 Ives than
if it were in a well ordered state.
In Addition to the loose floor sales
a large force of buyers are riding
in the country and offering good
prices for crops particularly suited
to their trade.
Since no tobacco is being handled
thia year at Cae" a:d Elkton and
but little at I' eeton, Hopkinsville
should be able vandle at least for
ty milliona of pounds this season,
Thia will make Hopkinsville a mark
et second to none in the state.
Notwithstanding the fact the
farmer haa to pay higher pricea for
the gooda be buys he ia enjoying
to-day opportunity as never before,
Everything he has to sell brings a
high price. He ia able to grow on
the farm practically everything for
his table and, unlike his city broth
er, is not compelled to purchase second-hand
all the necessaries of life.
Palmy days for the farmer are these.
WOMEN ELECT
DEMOCRATS
IN FOUR DISTRICTS IN GREAT
ER NEW YORK 3J.318 WOMEN
VOTE FOR CONGRESSMEN.
New York, March t. Control of
the house of representatives was re
gained by the democrats Tuesday
when they elected their candidutes
from four districts in Greater New
York at specials elections called to
choose successors to four members of
that party who had resigned their
seata in congress. New York women
had their first chance to vote since
they won the right at the polls hut
November. It was significant thin
they cast 31,318 votes out of a total
of 78,132 In the four districts. They
voted eurly, seemed to hiive niudo
up their minds what they were going
to do before they riAtohed the poll,
and they asked few "foolish" ques
tions. The successful cundidutes were:
Seventh district Kings county,
John J. Deluney, t., succeed John J.
Fitzgerald.
Eighth district Kint county,
William E. Cleary, to succeed Daniel
J. Cnflin.
Twenty-first district New York
county, Jerome F. Donovan, to suc
ceed Murray Hulbert.
Twenty-second district New York
and Bronx counties, Anthoisy J.
Griffin, to succeed Henry Bruckner.
CASUALTIES MONDAY.
Gen. Pershing reported to tha War
Department Monday tha namea of
the Lieutenant and nine privates
killed in action: of a Captain, a
Lieutenant and eleven men severely
wodnded and 10 men slightly wound
ed, all on Msrch 1, tha day of
German assault on an American
trench sector. I'he namea of a
Lieutenant and four men killed the
same day previously had been re
ported. The only Kentuckian in the
list was John L. Cray, of Drum,
Ky., who waa severely wouuded.
RED CROSS LINER FLORIZEL WRECKED ON REEFS OFF CAPE RACE
m r.
Korty-f.-ur survivor, all who wen-
liner Floriae "Vhlrh itruc, a reef north
h Zro, which
The FlorlM Is shown here ns an Ice
PATRIOTIC
FAREWELL
CRACEY BOY IN THE ARMY
WRITES LETTER ON START-
ING "OVER THERE."
Frank Summers, t Gracey boy j On Saturday March 2, the trustees
with the army, writes this patriotic of each of the eight educational di
letter to one of his boy friends: visions met in the office of Supt.
Co. A, 9th Battalion, 20th Engl- Foster and organized by electing a
neer, Washington, D. C, Mar. 1, chairman and secretary. These di
1918. vision boards have the selection of
Mv Dear Pal: all teachera of rural schools except
Well. I guess wa are separated
. ...
for the last time, as i am wruing m
say good bye before I take my de
parture to the other side of the pond,
to uphold the stars and stripes and
protect the women and folks at home.
Well Pal, I have to say ta-ta. Be
a man where ever your lot may fall,
I know not what will take place
in the U. S. after I am gone, but as
for my part I chose to be a man not
afraid to do for my country and
parents. I know not what my lot will
be in the war, but if it'a to die to
keep a Government like we have
I am willing, but I had rather be
dead than be under a Monarch's rule
under the kaiser.
Tell everybody "hello" and my re
cards with my usuul smile and hup-
py-go-lucky disposition. Tell
1 say, all things in he courtship line
are at an end as far as I nm con
cerned, that she whs the last one of
my girls.
Write me to the same address.
It will be forwarded to me. Toll ull
the boys to drop me a line.
P. S. You do not want to say
I am leaving as it means trouble for
me if you do. I am now making
5 cents a duy when 1 used to make
from $3.50 to 18.20 a day, but now
I am happier to know I have a cause
and a country worth white to tight
for.
Don't forget that I am always
your friend.
FRANK SUMMERS.
&&&&&&
' FOLLOWING IKE FLAG.
The Lluahcthtown High School
hui raised a service flag containing
70 stars, two Joi Majors an I 13 for
Lieutenants.
Edward Breathitt, son of Juvlge
James Breathitt, has aucceiwf ully
a.-Mcl his examination for admission
to the navy and lias taken the
oath. This was done at Indianapolis.
He has now returned to Evansville,
where he is at work. He will report
for duty whenever he is ordered to
do so.
Raymond Magruw, son of Dr. N. C.
Magraw, formerly of this county, but
now ef Cadis, ia critically ill of
pneumonia at Camp Taylor, both
lungs being affected. 11 is paresis
were informed by wire of hia condi
tion and they are now with bun.
A telegram Tuesday stated that he
was much jyorse. Young Magraw
volunteered for army service some
time ago and wca sent to Camp Tay
lor. . . .
DAIRY ASSOCIATION.
Tha Christian County Dairy As
sociation will meet at the II. B. M. A.
room at 10:30 a. m. to-morrow, far
impcrtant business.
K. C. GARY, Treat.
' -
' ...
l-ft ..f the ship company or 130. were taken from this Ill-fated Ited Cross
of Cape Hare. N. i during a terrtnc bllziard. The mnrleora were taken
was aent by th government to the ene with .portal 11vesnrtng appar.ti-.
breaker In ew lorK narnor.
BOARD OF
EDUCATION
SELECTED FOR CHRISTIAN CO.
AT MEETINGS LAST
SATURDAY.
, the county high schools.
. v:u -1 I.
Teachers
of county high schools are elected
by the County Board of Education
Tha chairman of the eight educa
tional divisions with the county sup
erintendent constitute the County
Board and the persmnel of the
Board will be as follows:
Chairman Supt. L. E. Foster.
Division No. 1 W. F. Lacey
(holdover.)
Division No. 2 J. T. Smithson.
Division No. 3 J. C. Johnson.
Division No. 4 Lee Witty.
Division No. 5 R. H. McGaughey
Division No. 6 J. O. Stegar.
Division No. 8 Edgar Harned.
TWO PAPERS AT
THE ATHENAEUM
MESSRS. WEATHERS AND FOS
TER ARE ON THE PRO
CRAM. The March meeting of the Athen
aeum will be held frj-night at Hotel
Latham with two papers. Mr. Ed
L. Weathers will write on "Our Is
land Possessions."
Prof. L. E. Foster's subject will
be "Kentucky In Rhyme." He is
substituting for President A. H.
Eckles.
BRIDEGROOM
IS KILLED
A YOUNG BRAKEMAN MI El 3
DEATH UNDF.P A TRAIN
AT NORTON VILLC.
Olit Smith, an L. A X. brakemau,
fell under a car while doing some
switching at Nortorwille Suturday
and was instantly killed. Smith's
home was in Gallatin, Tcnn. He
waa 23 years old and is survived
by his wife, whom ha married only
about a month -ago. Tha remains
were taken to Gallatin for interment
BASKET BALL,
The High School Aluu.ui basket
ball team will meet the fast Madi'
onville Y. M. C. A. team Friday
night at the Belmont Gymnasium
floor. This game ia expected to be
the fastest of tha season. Both teams
are composed oi lormcr lligli dciiool
and college athletes.
Tho Alumni team will line up as
follows:
P. Roberta L. F.
G. Injrsley R. K.
K. Ashby C.
J. Thompson L. G.
J. Randle R. G.
Kefcree "D" Kintf will call the
gama al a o clock. Admission 25c.
, ' Ji : W -V '
PURE BLOOD
RUNS HIGH
REGISTERED CATTLE AND HOGS
SOLD MONDAY FOR GOOD
PRICES.
A big crowd was in town last
Monday. There were several reasons
for this. It was Cunty Court day
and fair weather. The meeting of
the District Agricultural Board
was in session here and State Food
Administrator Fred M. Sackett was
here for three lectures. But the
main attraction for tbe farmers was
the public sales of registered Jersey
cattle by Atkins Bros., and register
ed Duroc hogs by J. U. Campbell
Atkins Bros.' sale was held at 10
a. m. on' the open Jot in the rear
of the Police Station. J. E. Cliborne
auctioneered the sale and did f.ne
work. Mr. C. R. Atkins reports
that Drices were satisfactory and
everybody is well pleased. The fol
lowing are average prices:
16 Registered cows witn first calf.
average $135 each.
12 Grade heifers with first caif.
average iU eacn.
It! Registered and Grade yearl
ing calves, $72 each
The big Duroc sale hel I by J. U.
Campbell at Dr Isboll'a stable was
success in every particular. le-
siiles a large attendance of local
people many of the lea ling htur rais
er of Kentucky, Tennessee an I In-
liana were nttracted here. These
visitors proved acti"e bidders and
willing buyers. The prices ranged
from to $!ilO and the average
fur -15 hogs soi l was $ 134.
In addition to crying the sale of
this herd, Col. Igiehart made a great
patriotic address preceding the open
ing of the sale.
TAX BOARD
IN SESSION
STATE BODY HOPES TO ACCOM
PUSH TASK IN TEN DAYS.
Frankfort, Ky., March i Hear
ings began Monday moniin on tin
.uiial property uases.-'iteMs lufi'ie
tne Mate lax coiiiiii-i:-i..n, w li.cn c.
piits to conclude in aSoiit t.-u d.i.s
w! at tj, old St;te It '..id of K.;ua!.
.atiin required iIO d:vs to !j.
Mates assignc 1 are :
Meiiday, March 4 Fayette, Han
cock, Nicholas, Boyle, Cumberland,
Washington, Russell, Grant, Laurel,
Calloway and Oldham counties.
TuesJay, Musch 5-Bourbon, Mar
tin, Gallatin, -Johnson, Christian,
Spencer, Adair, Floyd, Leslie, Butler,
Larue, Whitley, Pendleten and L'n
ion. Wednesday, March ft Clay, T
ler, Wayne, Franklin, Todd, flarra
Casey, Jacksou, Henry, Nvlson, Scott,
Clark, Fulton, Hickman and Lyon.
Thursday, Maruti 7 Robertson,
Campbell, Metcalfe. Hopkins, Harri
son. Trimble. Davievs, Warren, Madi
son, Barren, Knot, Boone, Knox and
Simpson.
Friday, March Jessamine,
Bracken, Carroll, Marshall. Marion,
Kof kcastle, Woodford and Kenton.
REFERENDUM RECOMMENDED.
It is recommended to tha New
York Senate that a referendum be
taken instead of ratifying tha Fe '
eral prohi&uon amendment.
AMERICANS
AGAIN REPULSE
Germans Start ITronblc la
Fall of Snow But Quick
ly Put to Flight.
SAMMIES TAKE PRISONERS
Several American Heroes Are
Decorated With Crosses
of Honor.
With bad weather prevailing,
there has been some more raiding.
The Germans in Lorraine again at
tacked the American troops and
met with defeat. Notwithstanding
the heavy snow and the previous re
pulses they had met with i.. their
effort to penetrate the American
positions, the enemy Monday night
in th Toul sector esnyed a sur
prise attack in considerable force
The American gunners and rifle n-.ea
were quickly after them, however,
and they were forced to bent a hnsty
retreat to the trenches.
Later the Americans themselves
;n the same region took the initiative,
.ind, sallying forth as a raiding unit,
penetrated German positions and
brought back a number of prisoners.
Bad weather generally prevails
along the entire western front but
nevertheless the Americana have
air.iin raided enemy positions near
Warm-ten, which lie to the south
west of Yprts, taking more prisoners
and several machine guns. This was
the second venture of the kind on the
part of the Australitns in as many
days in which the enemy losses have
been fairly high.
The Germans, aftr having heavily
bombarded the Britifh lines west of
Lens, launched an attack but the
British easily repulsed it, inflicting
heavy casualties on the Teutons and
taking a number of prisoners.
As in Frnnce and Belgium, the
weather conditions in the Aus'ro-
Italian front also are extremely bad
with snowstorms in the mountains
and heavy rains in the plains. Dur
ing breaks in the storm, however,
patrol parties have been active in
the mountain region and artillery
luels of considerable violence also
have taken place on various fectors.
Americans Win Crosses.
It is now permissible t give the
names oi tlie oHiccrs an I men ilec
orated by Premier Cleiacnceau. They
are :
Lieut. Joseph Canby, Brooklvn. N
Y.
Lieut. William Coleman, Charles
ton, South Carolina. ,
Sergeant Patrick Walsh. "
Sergeant William Norton. " -
Private ("Buddy") Pittman,
Brooklyn, N. Y.
Private Alvin Smiley, St. Louis.
The MTge.iM'i have been in the
the army iiutny years.
Both the privates distinguished
themselves by running through a bar
rage laid down by the Germans dur
ing the raid and delivering messages.
Two artillery officers, ('apt. Holt
zend'.irtf, whose home is in lieorj.
and I.uut. Green, will receive I
French wrr cross. They were wou i '
ed by shell (ire.
I. 'U's. Canby mid Coleman v.
ii iiitj .'o Man's Land in d.n.
"i I each took a German pn.- .. :.
"ergi int Norton killed a iin i
I c.i :. .: : nt an I two ' li. i
-:n challenged by the l.ei.icna ' '
l-,i e his dugout an I ! I o
ineii light.ng. Sci-v';.ni Wai.-... . -in
command of a detaihmert :i
fi"i nt of the wire wiu-n h.s c.; i
was killed an I continue. I the '
OUR HUN PRISONERS.
Already there are approximately
3,500 German prisoners in the Unit
ed Sutea. They are not captive
in battle. They have never seen tha
trenches, but a portion of tbem wirj
active participants in tha war a
ollWers and seamen. - Hot Springs.
in the mountains of North Carolina,
waa selected as an internment camp
for the interned seamen. It lies far
froci the sea and nestles ia the midst
of mountain ranges in western
North Carolina. For yeaos it waa a
medicinal resort patronized by
southern people. It ia almost sir
rounded by the French Broad riv.r.
it posses a great hotel capable cf
accommodating 400 or 600 people
and open spaces for tha building of
Darracka. otner war prisoner ar
interned at Fort Mcl'herson ami Fort
Oglethorp, Ca., whera eantonmem
have been erected iiriikr to those oc
cupied by troops.

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