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Semi-weekly Bourbon news. [volume] (Paris, Bourbon County, Kentucky.) 1883-1895, August 17, 1883, Image 1

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Semi-Weekly
B ourbon News.
Independent and Democratic Published from the Happy Side of Life for the Benefit of Those Now Having Breath in Their Bodies. Price, $2, 00 for One Year, or, $2,000 for 1,000 Tears CASH !
V VOL. II. PARIS, BOURBON COUNTY, KENTUCKY: FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 1883. NO. 154.
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Akotheb fine rain here "Wednesday.
Jo3. Miiavard died at Lexington, Tuesday,
at the age of 70 years.
'
The Methodist Conference begins at
September 12th.
Eves after our circus flood, some parts of
this precinct are needing rain.
-e-
A cat-wheel factory is being organized at
Lexington, with a capital of S500,000.
A few of our people have promised to go
and see Jumbo, storm or no storm.
Dr. Keller doesn't want to buy a little
book, jfyc prefers a Bourbon history.
Bush & Son's plaining mill, valued at
$20,000, burned in Lexington, Tuesday night.
The Bank of Maysuille, last week, bought
$20,000 worth of Mason county bonds. Bulletin.
MaysvtIiLe has a hog -wallow which the
city council proposes to show at the coming
fair.
We will give a trade dollar for two of those
Mercantile Directories. Don't all speak at
once.
4
" The little book makes Mose Chaplin a
sharper. His 3,000 place is mortgaged for
$8,000.
It's "No. 1," we are, and don't you erase
that from the bottom of the tablet of your
memory.
--
There is an apple tree near Muir's Station,
which is 100 years old and is bearing fruit
this year.
.
"War. Myall, School Commissioner, will
examine teachers desiring certificates, here
on the 25th inst.
The renting of the fair grounds booths and
other privileges takes place to-morrow. See
advertisement.
Our town clock is rated No. 1, in the Merchant's
little book, because it doesn't go on
the tick system.
--
AYir. SPEArs has written in his little book,
"I paid $10 for this book, which is just S10
more than it is worth."
The Crawford House is the place to stop
when you are in Cincinnati. It is convenient,
clean and well-kept.
4
O'BriEKS circus got side-tracked at Lexington,
and canceled Frankfort, on account of
a fire near the railroad track.''
A dozen or so of our subscribers might be
marked 0, 0, 0, 0, in the Merchants' Directory,
with a great deal of propriety.
.
Elbridge Ryan, of the Blue Licks, has a
small iron tomahawk which his little sistar
recently found on the old battle field.
The pardon business will be good now for
a few days. Two hundred pardon blanks
were printed for the Governor "Wednesday.
David Kennedy raised a fine lot of yellow
free-stone peaches, some of which weigh
nine ounces. He sells them at S2 per basket.
The Flemingsburg Times-Democrat has
broken up the Louisville Exposition, because
the managers wouldn't advertise in
it.
The scaffold on which Timberlake was
hanged at Lexington will be used for the execution
of Samuel Bulger on the 4th of September.
w
On the 2cth inst., the Board of Examiners
for the Kentucky State College, will meet in
Lexington, to examine applicants for scholarships.
A silk pfuasol wtjs left the other day in J.
Friedman's cheap store. Can be had by
owner if identified, and paying advertising
charges.
--
Judge Mann's line of busses conveyed the
forty Paris excursionists from Carlisle to the
Licks, a distance of nine miles, in one hour
and twenty minutes.
That little Exchange book sells for a $10
William. It strikes us that at that price
even some of us No. Is will have to get up on
a step-ladder to get one.
War. Spears sold his book back to the association
for 810, E. G. Muth his for S7.50, and
A. Newhoff refuses to take- one which he
says that he didn't subscribe for.
A barn, stable and ice-house with grain,
1 utensils, &c, valued at $1,000, the property of
Wilsor Buckler, of Nicholas county, wore
OL burned by an incendiary Tuesday night.
Hon. Jeff. Davis, Gen. Cheatham and
other renowned personages of the Lost
have been invited to the re-union of
:e Orphan Brigade, at Lexington, Septem-
1
Pryor, the Kentucky Berkshire
Iiog king, has our thanks for a bucket of as
fine honey as ever was brought to this city,
"We shall ever hold him- in sweet
brance.
-
The stock-holders of the Parks Hill Camp-
Meetin" Association made about 50 per cent.
their grounds during the past meeting.
' T'heir gross proceeds is estimated by out-
'"- OViders at near $10,000.
.
Wm. Thomas, a negro who killed his step-
vfU&jther in Woodford bounty, and who was
3ntenced to 10 years-in the penitentiary,
after serving 2
Hr.s pardoned yesterday,
fSdbs and 10 months.
VOUJJD On the circus grouds, a valuable
1 bracelet, which the owner can have by
. ing on Abraham Jones, (colored), at
U:Mak. Jones' grocery, in Claysville, and
. ing for this advertisement.
.AND-buyers and renters from Mason
mty are now gleaning our county papers
r Information, but those having land for
.de or rent privately, do not know their
business enough to advertise.
iiiss T4)j Roe, a fourteen years old girl of
'.' family, has sued Taylor Crain, a
.auny young farmer near Owingsville,
bastardy. The jury was discharged; ten
being for conviction and two for acquittal.
-Tom Phillips collected a load of wood off
a No. 7 yesterday. It consisted of a wad of
walnut orusn about the size of a crow's
nest Several parties labeled No. 1,
failed to meet small bills presented.
4
The Nicholas county court has granted an
appropriation of 1,000 per mile to the Summit
Station pike, which will be run from
the Leonadus Metcalfe place to the
pike at Zed Layson's a distance of 3
miles.
If any of our subscribers are anxious to
know our estimate of their financial standing,
they will please look at the dates on the
margins of their newspapers. That settles
the question regarding promptness not
ability.
t
Fabslers in .Bourbon or Clark desiring to
sell a moderately improved farm of from 75
to 125 acres of land, will confer af avor and
probably sell a farm, by addressing J. Oran
Pickrell, Minerva, Ky. Said land to be good
tobacco land.
ttp
There are said to be many errors in the
Merchants' Exchange Book. If everybody
had been rated 1, 2, 3, 4, it strikes us that the
book would have given better satisfaction.
Some say that it will do to lay away with
the late history of Bourbon.
Forrest Retreat, the former home of
Governor Metcalf, Nicholas county once
visited by Henry Clay and Andrew Jackson,
has a huge tobacco patch running almost up
to the front door, which is propably the finest
crop in Nicholas county.
-
The case of the Commonwealth against
John and Thomas Smart and John Brady,
closed last Saturday by his honor Judge
discharging Thos. Smart and John
Brady, and holding John Smart to bail in
the sum of 500. Carlisle Mercury.
The long-looked-for street cars have come
at last in Maysville. For the last three
months a committee of citizens has been
making daily visits to the depot to see if
Conductor Green had hauled them in
hooked on to the tail of his train.
We were told by a respectable citizen of
Carlisle, that after the closing of the camp-meeting,
the bottles wcie gathered up Tuesday
and brought to town, and that there
were at least four gross of all sorts and sizes
almost enough to fill a car when loaded in
loose.
Some of Craddock's hirelings are as mad as
wet hens because the Merchant's Directory a
has given their boss a low grade and the
News the highest grade of standing., "Well,
that was not our fault, nor was it our wish,
for we really don't care to be bothered about
loaning our money, and our credit is too
good already for our own good. The type-washers
and scissors manipulators may take
their pencils and reverse the grades if they
wish to we'll not get mad and act unseemly.
Another Little Book.
Charlie Butler, one of our clever and enterprising
young farmers, informs us that he
will call the farmers in a general assembly
to-morrow afternoon, for the purpose of getting
up a book entitled "The Farmers Guide
Book." It's purport will be to give the financial
status and standard of honor of all
the merchants, lawyers, doctors, and otker
professional men of Paris, for the benefit of
self-protection among farmers. Special attention
will be given to the short-weight
and measure men, &c, &c. The book will be
sold at the low down price of a dollar thus
placing it within reach of all the No. 4s.
' -e
A Considerate Little Girl.
When the circus tent blew down on
"Baby" Thomas, youngest daughter of Capt.
J. M. Thomas, she said to Morris Fitzgerald,
"Please, mister, will you take care of me ?"
Of course the gallant young son of Erin took
charge of her and took her home. On arriving
there in a half-drowned and in a thoroughly
chilled condition, the little one did
not forget for a moment to express her heartfelt
gratltnde, and after thanking and "re-thanking
liim, to doubly express her obligations
to her benefactor, she said as a
kind of a clincher, "Mister, if you ever get
into the penitentiary, just write to me and
I'll get you pardoned."
Card From T. C. Lyng.
Ed. Bourbon News:
Kindly grant me
space in to-day's edition of your paper to
explain my connection with the preparation
of the "Mercantile Directory," issued within
the last few days. With the inception of
the protective plan I had nothing to do. After
a complete organization I agreed for a
stated fee to compile and formulate from
the public records, as best I could, useful information
about the amount of assessed
owned by every adult resident of
firoperty together with the status of title
to same, as regards unreleased mortgage
liens, and liens for purchase money. These
records are public property and are always
open to the Inspection of the whole world
This work I did. xnai it was perfectly legi
timate and professional work, is rovea by
the well Known tact, tnat precisely similar
information, on a more limited scale, and
gleaned in precisely the same way, is furnished
almost daily to his individual clients,
by every lawyer in this and every other
town.
That the work, in tho main, was done 'as
thoroughly and accurately as the accessible
sources of information made possible, I have
the assurance of almost everyone who has
taken the trouble to read the modifying and
explanatory preface before seeking informa
tion in tne oouy oi tne uook.
With the commercial ratings I had
nothing to do. Eaoh morohant Who
chose marked the promptness or slowness
of his own customers by appropriate
figures, and these figures were afterwards
copied accurately into.the proper column of
t.lin mfinuserint. Anv merchant of the "Ex
change" will verify tMsr After the manuscript
passed out of my hands, more than six
montns ago, my connection avilii uic wora.
ceased. With the printing, publication and
distribution of the books I had nothing to
do. I make this statement to explain the
extent of my connection with the "Book,"
and not to seek to justify that connection or
to apologisG for it, That the matter of the
"BOOK" nas Decoine puuiio is t" uc
regretted. It was intended only for use by
the members of the association as a business
book of strictly private reference; and as
such is perfectly legitimate and unobjectionable..
What I (iia, I did advisedly; and if I
continue to receive assurances from my em'
ployers that my part of the work is as accurate
and thorough as I tried earnestly to
make it, I expect to have very little left to
regret, ana notnjng to uo peuuuuo loi.
Very Respectfully, T. C. LYNG.
Found. . yajiiftble gold breast-pin was
found on the Winchester pike, vhioh thp
owner can have by proving property and
paying for this advertisement. Apply at
TALBOTT dsJELlBLEB'S. ,
SCINTIXTATJONS.
S. C. Boullemet, of New Orleans, is the
guest of T. T. Owlngs.
England Is no longer the mother country.
She's only assister to us.
Judge Richard Reid, our next Appellate
Judge, was in town Tuesday.
Capt. Havens, of the Mt. Sterling SentiT
nel, paid us a call yesterday afternoon.
Mrs.E.H. Burnam and son John.of Mexico,
Mo., are visiting Mrs. Chas. Stephens.
Mrs. W. P. Adery has returned from visiting
her father, R. F. Adair, at Washington,
Ky.
Judge Riddle, candidate for Appellate
Judge, from Irvine, was in town Wednesday.
Miss Ida Muir,of Muir's,after a brief visfl
to Miss Mamie Young, left for her home
Wednesday.
Judge Mann, of Carlisle is the guest of
Ex-Governor McCreary, at Richmond, and
is attending the fair.
Don't call.it the "Sweet By-and-by;"
that's too old and stale. Call it the "saccharine
subsequently."
What lady was it that took shelter under
the elephant, when she crawled out from
under the circus tent?
Mrs. D. D. Conway fell down stairs and
sprained her ankle several days ago, and is
still unable to walk a step.
A man may die before he gets Justice.
Then again he may get it when he dies, if he
is hanged by due process of law.
Regular services at the Baptist church
next Sunday morning at 10:30 o'clock.
Preaching by Rev. J. A. French, pastor.
Ed.Boyd and wife,of Carlisle,Avill go with
the Orphan School excursionists Monday, to
Old Point Comfort, for a two weeks' recreation.
'
Green R. Keller and wife and Mrs. Rho-da
Conway, of Carlisle, passed through here
Wednesday en route for the Louisville Exposition.
"Why do editors remain single?" asks a
newspaper writer. Because ladies dislike to
rest under'the imputation of having married
for money.
"Man that is born of woman is of few
days and full of troubl." Woman that is
born of woman is in the same fix. Lexington
Transcript.
Our lady excursionists to the Licks only
took thirty trunks and a few valises quite
surprise to the 'bus line, but all were sent
safely over in due time.
Miss Scisily Pryor, of this counts', is now
visiting the family of Joshua M. Jackson,
near Xenia, and her sister, Mrs. George M.
Coulter, near Sabina, Ohio.
Major Thos. Ov.'ings (not'Owens) has returned
from his second mashing tour at
Crab Orchard. The Major is financially
high-flung and hard to down, he is.
Judge B. F. Buckner has written his
cousin, Horace Miller, of this county, that
he has formed a partnership with Bob
of Louisville, in the law business.
Miss Eva Simpson, after whom Oscar
Gilman's Eva S. was named, has just completed
and placed in John T. Hinton's window,
an elegant crayon painting of Mrs. Jno.
Gnadinger.
John Wesley's breastpin was among the
articles offered for sale at a recent London
fair. Mr. Wesley, it is believed, was not a
hotel clerk, and his pin did not attract much
attention.
Charles Carrol Leer traded Capt. Dan
Turney a cotswold ram for a weeks' board at
the Arlington, and on Tuesday evening the
Captain sold his-Mary's little sheep to Horace
Miller, for $20.
W. W. Stephens, who has been absent in
Africa for the last few years, has returned to
his home in Ruddles Mills. He is a brother
of Geo. Stephens, bar-keeper at the Arlington
House, Blue Licks.
Ninety-nine out of one hundred of the
wax-chewers are guilty of the still more detestable
habit of taking hold of the wax with
their fingers and stringing It out of their
mouths in to great ugly ropes. Ugh !
The two hotels it the Blue Licks are
having a delightful series of hops this week.
Miss Maggie Clay, of this city, and Miss Fannie
Shropshire were the belles of the ball at
tho Arlington House, Tuesday evening.
This is a remarkable fact, but nevertheless
true. Every married man at the Licks
Tuesday night but Harry Frisbie, was without
his wife, and every married lady was
without her husband. Yet there were lots of
both married men and women present.
The forty Presbyterian excursionists
from this county to the Blue Licks, have
had their stay at the Arlington House extended
until Monday morning; but some of
them who went prepared to stay only until
to-day, may be looked for at home this
morning.
On asking a very intellectual and refined
lady in the ball room of the Arlington
House at the Blue Licks Tuesday night,
what she thought of the popular round
dances of the day, she replied: "I think
that they are nothing more than old fashioned
hugging set to music."
Forty excursionists on the Presbyterian
plan, besides a number of other Bourbons
are sojourning at the Arlington House, Blue
Licks, this week. We observed several
Storming the citadels of each others affections
and partaking of Blue Xilck and other
innocent amusements, Tuesday.
There are two very obnoxious features in
society that are very grating and shocking
to the nervous constitutions of the truly
cultivated, which should be ruled out and
suddenly forgotten. We refer to gum-chewing
and dude jug-handling the ladles' arms.
The two features are more strictly confined
to the dudes and the dudettes, but are often
times practiced by the more cultivated and.
elderly classes, It is here where the actual
horrifying business comes in. On tho stage
coaches, railway coaches, in churches, lec
ture rooms and even in tho parlors of the
elite can bo discerned the never-relenting
chew, chew, chew, chew-now and chew-forever,
never-let-up chew, chew, chew, chew.
It Is indeed too awfully awful to behold, and
describe. Words cannot describe In terms
severe enough to properly condemn the two
habits, and we hope that if perchance guilty
qnes Jake time tp rea4 tlese few linos,
they will", for the sake of the truly disgusted,
turnTwaVfr
puDlic, at least.
That Merchant' Exchange Book.
There Is some tall kicking going on over
a little book recently published by a society
here called the Merchant's Exchange. It's
purport is to establish the financial standing
of every farmer, business or professional
man In the county, for the protection of the
men who wish to guard against bad debts accruing
in their business relations with the
citizens of this county. We have not seen
the book, nor do we know anything about it
farther than was printed by "W. A. Johnson,
who suffered long and loud before he
got his money for it (if he's got it yet.) It is
said that the News Is reported No. 1 in it's
columns, while another paper noted for It's
exijursion propensities is reported a lower
gride. If this be true, that is no fault of
ours. If our conduct in business transactions
with the authors of the book has been
such as to justify them In grading our standing
first-class financially, we plead guilty to
the charge of No. 1 only in point of honor,
and not In finances yet, we manage to meet
all bills at maturity. If others have not acted
as to be so justified with the authors of
the book, surely it is no fault of ours.
The Southern girls at the White Sulphur
and Alum Springs in Virginia are represented
to wear more diamonds and a greater
quantity of white lead and French rougo
than any other beauties in the world. At
the White Sulphur Springs these dark-eyed
syrens from the Carolinas, Georgia, Alabama,
Florida, Mississippi, Tennessee and Kentucky
first introduced the white, fleecy,
voluminous costumes now worn extensively
at all the resorts of maids and matrons.
The City Council met in special session
Wednesday evening, and.took a second vote
on granting W. A. Hill a permit to erect a
wooden building on Main streetr privilege
granted. The proposition declaring Tom
Brent's dust factory a nuisance was voted
down by a vote of five to one the petitioners
nearly all being absent.
O'Briens Circus exhibited at Lexington
last Tuesday. Not enough money was taken
in at the afternosn performance to pay their
license $180- By selling a gray mare for $75
and adding to it the receipts for the evening
performance, enough money was realized
to pay their bills.
-
Miss Lillie Thomas, of Bourbon county,
after spendingxa pleasant week in our city,
returned home last Thursday, much to the
regret of one of our boys. Mt. Sterling
Sentinel.
-
The Trader, Turfrnan, Farmer
and Sportsman.
Sucking mules are selling in Nicholas
county at from 70 to $90.
Now that Leonatus is off the turf, Drake
Carter will probably contest for the Omni-
bus Stakes at Monmoth.
Leonatus has not completely lot down as
was supposed, but will retire from the turf
for the balance of the year.
At Rochester Wednesday, Tony Newell
won in the 2:22 ciass in 2:16, The special
purse was won by Trlcket, in 2:19.
Tho weights of the prominent trotters and
pacers now on the turf range from 770 pounds
up to 1,100. Catchfly and Phallas are each of
the latter weight and Bichball of the former.
At the Sharpsburg fair, Nobby was the
winner in the three-minute race; best time,
2:32. Hattle S. in the two-year-old class,
2:33; Stonewall in three-year-old class, 2:51;
Mystery in 2:30 class, 2.-32; Mollie Jack In
2:45 class, 3:02; Alice Stoner in free-for-all,
2:34. Andy English won in gentleman's
roadster ring, and Geo. Majury, of Montgomery,
won in the mule race,
The following Bourbons took premiums
on stock at the Sharpsburg fair : Colt, regardless
of sex, McClellan fc Bro.; bull, 3
years old and over, R. W. Owen & Son; gelding
2 and under 3, E. K. Thomas; sow, any
age, L. R. Huffman; horse or mare, any age,
John'T. Craig; cow, 3 years old and over,
Owen & Son; stallion, 2 and under 3, II. R.
Talbott; mare under 1 year old, C. H. Rice;
model horse, mare or gelding, J. H. Thomas;
pair matcnea geiaing, Taioott & uro.; mare,
2 and under 3, G. R. Redmon; mare, 1 and under
2, McClelland & Bro.; mare colt under 1
year old, C. R. Redmon; gelding 4 and over
Victor & Kerr; gelding 3 and under 4, C. R.
Redmon; gelding 2 and under 3, W. S. Talbott;
pair coach mares or geldings, Victor &
Kerr.
Mr. Henry Simons, of Louisville, the owner
of the trotting horse, John R., has brought
suit against the Bath County Fair and Trotting
Association for 5,000, for damages done
to his horse in the race last Friday. The
particulars of the race are xibout as follows.
In the third heat John R., Alice Stoner and
Alexander came under the string almost
neck and neck, and it was hard to decide
which was the winner. The judges held a
consultation and decided that it was no heat
for the reason that Simons was holding his
horse back. They therefore took him off
and put on another driver,. James Burbridge,
of Sharpsburg, who, Simons claims, was
green and drove his horse the wron way of
the track at a 2:30 gait, spraining Jhls ankle
and injuring him so that he sold him for
S2,000. He now brings suit for damages.
Col. H. L. Stone, of this city, is Mr. Simons'
attorney. Mt. Sterling Sentinel.
?
Last Week, Charlea Cassldy, of V A
Btywc, , U0n Station, half Way between Paris and
unitedinmarriagetomissLidaRose,omex.ngtonj'onthe a Railr()ad
was
Sharpsburg,
Jabez Dooly, a, prQmtaenJtra.dey of Nich
olas county, died last wek at his home near.
r a ainful and linZerin i11""
i ucsb.
S,H, H Prop'r, I B, mm, Oat,
JOMSOH HOUSE
lUXTLXiERSBUItG, KY.
One square from the depot. Good
Livery Stable Attached. The
kindest attention given and guests made
comfortable.
Good Sample Eooms. A table filled
with all all the delicacies of the season.
BATES REASONABLE.
WM. KENNEY, M. D.,
PBACTITIONEB OP
MEDICINE tfc SURGERY,
May be found during the day, when
not professionally engaged, at Brooks &
Lyman's Drug Store , at night, at the residence
of Prof. E. Amende, on'High st.
CHRIS. GROSCHE,
BAKER f HI.
DEALER IN
Fruits, Cakes, Fancy
Goods, Cigars and
Tobacco, &c.
FRESH BREAD EVERY DAY.
JBSOne door above the Thurston House.
S. B. EWALT,
LIVERY SALE AND COMMISSION
STABLE,
High Street, Paris Kentucky.
Will break colts to best advantage.
Horses bought and sold on a small margin,
also boarded on as good terms as any
other stables in Paris.
- '
W. DAVIS,
-Dealer In
FTJB, N ITU BE,
Window Shades, Carpets, Oil
Cloths, Mattresses, &e.,
Special Attention Given to
Undertaking and Repairing.
Main Street, Paris, Ky.
'Kimmy' Kimbkougit, J as. S. Huff
KIMBROUGH HOUSE,
CARLISLE, KY.
KIMBROUGH & HUFF, Prop's.
o
Large and Commodious Sample Eooms
on first floor for commercial men. Baggage
transferred to and from the depot
free of charge.
T. V. HALL,
AND
MECHANICAL ENGINEER,
formerly of Cincinnati.
MILLERSBURG, - - - KY.
JyDesigns, Drawings and Specifications
including costs on all Architecture
and Machinery, furnished accurately and
promptly. sepl9v
i
T. W. POTTS,
LiYeiy, Sale
& Feed Stable,
CARLISLE, KY.
Horses boarded, trained and sold on
commission. Livery rigs always kept for
public hire. Terms reasonable.
R. M. KENNEY,
SUR. VBYO 3EL 7
Paeis, Ky.,
Will attend to all calls in his line, in
Bourbon and surrounding counties, with
promptness. Charges Reasonable. tf
HENRY DAUM,
Fashionable Barber
Opp. Odd Fellows Hall .... Paris, Ky
FARM FOR SALE
AS AGENT FOR THE WILMOT
heirs, I will offer for sale privately, the
nm sf 1A arwcia cifiiafn3 roor T3 nf
I LiXLLLX Jk JLUU aXVOi OIVUUIVU AJWC4A
the branch of the Uelhlehem and Hopewell
Turnpike running in front of the
door. About 60 acres are under cultivation,
and balance in grass. Good brick
residence in good repair. Good water,
orchard, ice-house, barns and all necessary
outbuildings. This farm is a very
valuable farm perhaps as good land as
there is in the oountv or bluegrass region,
and is a rare ohance for purchasers de
siring a small larm.
Call on or address me at Paris, Ky.
J, SfcUTtt KENNEY, Aax.
I
JOHM J, LOSG, Prop'r, JfiHI J. LOIC (M
PURSELL HOUSE
M1LLERSBURG, KY,
Bates, Two Dollars Per Day
Nice Sample Rooms for Commercial men.
Livery and Sale Stable Connected
FIRE ISSDEANCE t
J. RX
agent fob
7 LARGEST COMPANIES 7
IN THE WORLD J
& bosses -Promptly Paid.
Rates as Low as The Lowest.
"BLUE GRASS ROUTE"
KY. CENTRAL RAIL ROAD.
Is the shortest and quickest route
to MISSOURI, KANSAS and
TEXAS. Tickets to all
points North, East
and West.
Time Card in Effect July 29th, '83:.
TRAINS SOUTH.
Lve Covington 8:00 nm 3:00 pm
Lve Falmouth 9:35 am 4:35 pm
Lve Cynthlana 10:40 am 5:10 pm
Arr Paris ... .... . .11:15 am 6:15 pm
Arr Winchester 12:10 pm 7:15 pm
Lve Winchester 12:25 pm 7:30 pm
Lve Richmond 1:40 pm 8:40 pm
Lve Lancaster 10:08 pm
Arr Stanford June 10:35 pm
TRAINS NORTH.
Lve Stanford June 4:45 am
Lve Lancaster 5:10 am
Lve Richmond 6:30 am 1:00 pm -2:05
Arr Winchester 7:33 am pm
Lve Winchester 7:33 am 2:20 pm
Arr Paris 8:30 am 3:15 pm
Lve Paris 8:3Uam 3:15 pm
LveCyntiana 9:05 am 3:52 pm
Lve Falmouth 10:04 am 4:53 pm
Arr Covington 11:45 am 6:30 pm.
MAYSVILLE & LEXINGTON DIVISION.
TRAINS SOUTH.
Lve Maysville . . . 7 . . . 6:10 am 1:00 pm
Lve Carlisle 7:35 am 2s.'6 pin
Lve Millersburg 7:58 am 2:48 pin
Lve Paris 8:30 am 3:15 pm
Arr Lexington 9:20 am 4:00 urn
TRAINS NORTH.
Lve Lexington 0:00 am 5:25
Lve Paris 0:50 am (!:15 in
Lve Millersburg 7:15 am 6:40 pm
Lve Carlisle 7:35 am 7:00 pm
Arr Maysville 9:00 am 8n j.iu
LEXINGTON ACCOMMODATION.
Lve Paris . . . . , 11:30 am
Arr Lexington 12:05 pm
Lve Lexington 7:40 am
Arr Paris 8.30 am I 3:15 p-a
SUNDAY TRAINS
Arrive at Paris going Northward at 3:15 pm,
arriving at Covington at 6:30 pm.
Trains going Southward leaves Covlngten
at 3:00 pm, arriving at 8:15 pm.
Special Rates to EMIGRANTS.
jearFor tickets, rates ad information
to time, connections, Ao., call on cr
address JOHN STUART, Acent,
Paris, ky.
G. W. Bhudhr, C. L. Brown,
Supt. G. P. &JF.A.
JAMES McARDLE,
MERGHAN7 TAILOR,
Grrand Opera Build'?,
CINCINNATI, O.
LAMAE HOUSE,
(GREEN CHEATHAM, Pbop'b.)
CARLISLE, KY.
o
One Square from Railroad Depot Ah
Baggage transferred to and fro, free
charge 1
IilVERX STABILE ATTACHED
nov!4y
Walnut and Cherry Logs.
Will pay cash for logs ten, twelve and
and fourteen feet long. Must be straight
and clear of bad defects, and not less than
eighteen inches in diameter.
J. M. THOMAS.
DR. YMSAHL
BBOADW AT, PaEM T,
(8 to 9 A.M.
Office Honrsl "4P.M,
U" 8 P.M.
MAMA0 MAMA
PHASES T. THROOP,
CARLISLE,
I Office OTer B. F. Adjp, gTOOWy.
I noYloy
u.
flMPERFECT IN ORIGINAL
1 ! I mill ! i i ' I I " " . i in ii i

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