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The Bourbon news. [volume] (Paris, Ky.) 1895-19??, May 05, 1914, Image 1

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NEWS
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PUBLISHED EVFRY TUESDAY AND FRIDAY IN THE YEAR
VOLUME XXXII
PARIS, KENTUCKY, TUESDAY, MAY 5, 1914.
BOURBON
EKVQYS TAKE UP
TROUBLE BETWEEN
HUERTA AND U. S.
Carrahza:s Refusal Will Not
Deter Them In TheirMe-
diatiom Efforts!
MASSACRE FEARED
IN MANZANILLO
Americans Horribly Treated
and the Ambassadors
Interfere
WASHHINGTON, May 4. Despite
the refusal yescerday of Carranza,
Constitutionalists chief, to declare an
armistice with the Huerta govern
ment, the South American envoys to
dav resumed their sessions, still hope
f,J iiiat PvnPtR of the next three or
four days would broaden the horizon
or their negotiations to mciuue me
entire Mexican problem.
Carranza, declining the suggestion
of a truce, asserted a suspension of
hostilities "would only accrue to the
benefit of Huerta in the civil war now
going on in Mexico between the Usur
per Huerta and the Constitutionalist
Armv under my command."
With the rebel chief's reply in
hand, the envoys proceeded to their
task of attempting to settle issues be
tween Huerta and the Washington
government. Hope that Carranza's
followers eventually might be brought
into the proceedings was based on a
prospect for appointment of delegates
of all parties in the dispute to meet
with the mediators.
wirst response to the envoys re
quest for the naming of delegates
-was seen here in some quarters in
tho ordering of Joapuin D. Cassasus,
former Mexican Ambassador to the
United States, from Carlbad to Wash-
i. Tingle tiiA -nature of his mis
sion was not announced, yet it was be-1
lieved lie bad been ciiosen to auu iui
Huerta in the proposed conferences.
If Carranza were to name a delegate,
-,H0De was expressed that the media
tors mignt reach the broad field of ne
gotiations at which they aim.
Mexico City Tumors heard in Vera
:raz stated suggestions were circu
lating in the capital that Huerta
might resign and a Provisional Presi
ded be appointed with om ar
ranza might consent to treat with l the
object of facilitating mediation. Such
reports were received here without
comment.
MEXICAN SHIP BLOWN UP.
MEXICO CITY, May 4. A dispatch
aid to come from Manzanillo, on the
Pacific coast, announced that tne
Mexican steamship Luella was sunk
in the harbor by the explosion oi a
mine which had been planted for the
United States protected cruiser Ra
leigh. No loss of life was mentioned.
The steamer belonged to the Pacific
Railway Company.
FEAR VIOLENCE.
WASHINGTON, May 4. American
Consul Stadden, of Manzanillo, who
arrived at San Diego, Cali., Saturday,
aboard the German steamer Marie
with 259 refugees, reported to the
State Department that Mexicans on
the day of his rl-parture had taken
American flags aom the consulate,
tampled up on t ." and burned them.
He and his ie.. Ai.- ricans had
been given forty-c r ' hojrr. to leave
Mexico, dating frcn-. .- i, April 22.
Adolph Steff, the N- 'pttI-h Consul
at Manzanillo, was foi to ties to
sa.ed his life, Doaraea uie aiauC
r-ugee after placing the archives of
the consulate on the steamer Leonora,
i i j. ..m-iil in' Qnn I
a Mexican vessel, out uwucu " .
Francisco. , A - A
Consul Stadden said that the treat
ment given the Americans was uuni
bl ' Had it not been for the good
offices of the British and Geman
Consuls, he said, many Americans in
the Colima district would have been
"slaughtered." Some Americans ar
riving at Manzanillo from the interior
were forced to pay 1.000 pesos each
to the military authorities The Con
sul praised the efforts of the skipper
of the Marie, Capt. J- .Davldsn'
protect American citizens . Consul
Stadden added that after April 22 he
was not allowed to use the telegraph.
T don't blame the girl a bit.
What's the use of having a good fig
ure if you have to cover it up when
you go out9
UMdULIINC nun I IMWn i
IGNITES CAUSING FIRE-
The saloon of Bud Macon, colored,
on Main street, was badly damaged by
fire Friday afternoon about four
o'clock. The fire was caused by gas
oline, in a lighting tank taking fire
and exploding. The machine was un
dergoing repairs when a spark was
communicated to the gasoline and in
an instant the entire room was envel
oped in flames. Employes were com
pelled to flee from the building.
An alarm of fire was sent in and
when the department arrived on the
scene the blaze had gained consider
able headway. Considerable difficulty
was experienced in getting into the
building in the face of the stubborn
blaze, but with a good water pressure
the flames were soon under control.
The building, owned by the Cough
lin heirs, was damaged lo the extent
of several hundred dollars, fully cov
ered by insurance. Macom had been
conducting a saloon in the building,
but retired May 1, and having moved
a portion of his bar fixtures, had in
stalled four pool tables. The tables to
gether with a considerable stock of
liquors,were ruined by fire and water.
His loss will reach several hundred
dollars and he carried no insurance.
Stored on the second floor of the
building was a quantity of lodge para
phernalia, owned by colored people,
and this also was badly damaged.
i
maom in nnpri
BUYS ELKS' HOMB
-FOR $15,450 jr
"WE KNOW HOW"
4,
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Master Commissioner Sells W ,?
valuable Property to Sat
isfy Bondholders
'. ' v.
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Spring Styles
WILL MAKE SOME
IMPROVEMENTS
SOLD BY COMMISSIONER.
Auctioneer M. F. Kenney sold yes
terday for Master Commissioner C. A.
McMillan the Thomas Paynter proper
ty in Ruddies Mills to J. Ritchie for
$550.
Fire, wind and lightning insur
ance. Thomas & Woodford.
PROGRESS OF FARMERS IS
RETARDED BY HEAVY RAINS
The heavy rains of ear,ly yesterday
and last night will have the effect of
retarding the progress of the farmers
of Bourbon in their spring seeding.
The backward, season has greatly hin
dered the farmers in their early plant
ing, but most of them have taken ad
vantage of the most favorable weather
conditions and in preparing their
ground have pushed the seeding with
all haste. A large acreage last week
was planted in corn.
Tobacco plants are looking well and
the condition is such as will permit
transplanting about the middle of
May .A larger acreage will be planted
than in several years and with a
fyorable season a record, breaking
chrop is expecteed. It is the inten
tion of many, that the crop this year
will be larger than that of 1910.
The fruit crop is very promising, as
the buds were not affected by the late
frost which accompanied the cool
weather about a week ago. Gardens
are looking well. It is thought that
nothing injured during the chilly
nights the first of the week.
SUPERIOR FURNITURE POLISH
Gives new polish to old furniture;
produces a gloss or hand rubbed fin
ish; dries hard; never sticks; never
injures. Call and get sample; every
bottle fully guaranteed.
CHAS. E. BUTLER & CO.
Opp. Court House, Paris, Ky.
(1-tf)
There are lots of pitchers and lost
of girls who show speed but lack control.
ELKS WILL HOLD IMPORTANT
MEETING THIS EVENING.
An important meeting of the mem
bers of the Elks' Lodge will be held
this evening at the lodge room. All
members of .the order are requested
to be present as matters of impor
tance will be taken up, the principal
one of which will be the selection of
a lodge room.
ROOM-SIZE DRUGGET
TO BE GIVEN AWAY.
See the room-size Brussells drugget
in J. T. Hinton Company's window.
To be given away at the auction sale
of Main street lots on Wednesday,
May 6, at 2:30 p. m. Other prizes
will also be given away at this sale.
(td)
Purchasers Will Get Poscpq- : W
. .... iw
sion When Court Con
firms Sale
m
Auctioneer M. F. Kenney sold yes
terday at the court house door in this
city for Master Commissioner C. A.
McMillan the Elks' Building located!
on the corner of Main and Bank Row j
to the Masonic Lodge of this city. The
price paid was 15,450.
The sale of the building was the re
sult of a foreclosure of the bondhold
ers in the building, a decree of court
haying been obtained to satisfy a
claim to an amount of 12,000 in the
preferred bonds. Mr. Charles Ste
phens represented the Masonic lodge,
while R. K. McCarney, representing
several members of the lodge was a
contending bidder.
The Elks' building, which is a four-
story structure, was completed in the
year 1903 at a cast of $35,000. It j
is a handsome and imposing structure,
containing a large number of office
suites on the second floor, storerooms
on the first floor, while the third floor
was occupied as club rooms and the
fourth floor the lodge room. The sale
of the property will be confirmed at
the term of Circuit Court to be held
in June, when the building will pass
into the ownership of the local Ma
sonic Lodge.
Extensive improvements are plann.
ed, which will give a larger number of
office rooms.
V
1 In Men's Shoes Are Now on Display4.
at Our Store.
The Stetson, Korrect Shape and Mtich
ell & Blakemore Special Line
'of Shoes are here in all styles, both in high cut and
Oxfords Gun Metal, Tans and Patent Leathers, low cut
Oxfords in the new swagger English last, made with in-
visible eyelets, low, flat heel and sole. We have both
styles, with the rubber sole and heel and the leather
bottoms. There is none better made than the line of
Shoes we carry and we want you to come to this store
and buy a pair of our Shoes.
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FOR TENDEf? FEET,
Grover's soft shoes for tender feet,
strictly hand-made. The best shoe in
the world for ladies.
GEO. McWILLIAMS,
(6-lt) The Shoe Man.
LARGE HOUSE ON EIGHTH
STREET DESTROYED 3Y FIRE
The large frame building on West
Eighth street, near Lylesville, belong
ing to Mollie Warren, colored, was de
stroyed by fire at an early hour Fri
day morning, entailing a loss of about
$1,200, only a portion of which was
covered by insurance. The building
was under a lease to Steve Moore, col
ored, the undertaker, and contained
two buggies, a "dead wagon," 10 cask
ets, a lot of harness and one horse.
Everything in the building burned
with the exception of the horse,
which was taken from the adjoining
building. Moore's loss will reach
about $800, with $500 insurance.
SEED CORN.
Carefully selected seed corn, tested
for germination. Good. Phones 84.
R. B. HUTCHCRAFT.
(21-3 wks) Paris, Ky.
They fall in love at first sight.
Then they get married, take a second
look, and fall out.
What has become of the old-fashioned
man who had to support his
grandchildren before he was through
supporting his children?
Korrect Shape, $4
Stetson Shoes, $5 and $6
ni
Mixchell & Blakemore's Special, $5.
Dr. Reed's Cushion Sole, $5 and $6.
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Mitchell & Blakemore,
The Store for Men's Styles
Paris, Kentucky
I
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-CALLAHAN DEFENDANTS ARE
DENIED A NEW TRIAL
The April term of the Clark Circuit
Court closed Saturday, after Judge
Benton overruled motions for new
trials in the cases of Andrew Johnson
and Jim Deaton, who were convicted
of the Assassination of farmer Sheriff
Ed Callahan, of Breathitt county.
HOG CHOLERA
We sell the celebrated Laughlin
Hog Cholera Remedy. A sure cure.
Hundreds of testimonials of Bourbon
farmers of wonderful cures.
(It) VARDEN & SON.
"GO TO SUNDAY SCHOOL 1
SUNDAY" OBSERVED HERE
ATTENTiON, EPWORTH LEAGUE!
"Hie regular monthly business ses
ssfon of the Paris Epworth League
wT be held Thursday night at 7:15
c clock, at the Methodist Church. It
is especially urged that every member
be presnted at this meeFing as Confer
erence Committeec will be appointed
safe- various plans arranged for the
entertainment of Kentucky Epworth
t .!... nnanrB in Jim ft.
-iVmvTVTTC! V fiMAPP.
President Park JT. L
PRISONERS WILL GET
BACK PAY FOR SERVICES
Prisoners in the Kentucky peniten
tiary will receive back pay for their
services under the prison labor con
tract law from June 15, 1910, when
the law allowing them compensation
became operative, until August 15,
1912, when they were first allowed
compensation. Judge Stout, in the
Franklin Circuit Court, decided in fa
vor of the prisoners in a suit brought
in their behalf against the board.
The amount involved is about $100,
000, estimating on the present basis
of pay, which aggregate about ,$50,
900 yearly.
"Go tc Sunday School Sunday"May '
3, set aside by Governor McCreary in
a proclamation, was enthusiastically
observed in this city. The attend
ance, it is estimated reached the 1,000
mark, and included a large number
who were wholly unaccustomed to at
tending Sunday school.
At the Presbyterian church -the at
tendance was 135, and after the class
exercises, Rev. Dr. B. M. Shive, the
pastor of the church, delivered an ex
cellent sermon which was both inter
esting and instructive.
At the Methodist church the Sun
day schoo lroom was packed, many
being forced 'to stand. The total class
enrollment was233,among the number
being many who accepted the invi
tation to become permanant mem
bers. At the Christian church 465
were in attendance 106 of whom were
in the woman's class, taught by Mrs.
T. A. Hendricks, and 86 in the men's
class, taught by Prof. T. A. Hendricks.
Rev. W. E. Ellis, the pastor of tbe
church, preached a strong sermon
following the Sunday school, in which
he made an irresistible appeal to, the
l-adults for a more regular attendnce,
and which, is sure to have fine results.
Altogether, the morning was a not-
iable one in Sunday school circles nd
jmuch good is certain to follow the
efforts for universal, attendance, both
' aL Sunday school and church.
EXTRA SPECIAL,
$
Silk, Poplin and Moire Suits
Black and o411 New Shades
1 1
75
1
Alterations Free.
vo
BIG REDUCTION
In Prices of
- ' Suits, Coats,
Silk and Wool Dresses
H?
FRANK 6c C.
.
The" Store WheFe Reliability Reigns.-
INadia, Calma and Rengo Belt
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