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The Bourbon news. [volume] (Paris, Ky.) 1895-19??, January 17, 1919, Image 2

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THE BOTOBON NEWS, PABIS, KENTUCKY
FRIDAY, JANUARY 17, 1915.
PAGE TWO
JJE BOURBON NEWS
Briablished 188137 Years of Con
tinuous Publication
&Wished Ereiy Tuesday and Eriday
Par Year. $2.00 6 Months. .$1.00
Payable in Adavance.
VWJLfcT CHAMP, Editor and Owner.
gafetered at the Paris, Kentucky,
Pcwtoffice as Mail Matter o the
Beoond Class.)
EDITORIAIKUSraGS.
Independent of German Potash
Close upon the heels of the partic
ulars concerning the achievements
ef America chepiists in putting our
own. national dyes "over the top,"
comes frequent official assurances
.tEaX "the' United States does not
need German potash." Secretary of
the Interior, Franklin K. Iiane, says
that when the war started, this
country having had nearly a quarter
of a million tons of potash from Ger
jmajty each year, found herself sud
denly cut off from this important
fertilizer material. American scien
tists got busy and if was not long
before potash was being obtained
from the brine lakes of California,
Nebraska and other State; from
kelp, and ,from the seaweed of the
Pacific Coast, and frojm various min
erals. The scarcity of potash has
boosted the price; and this new in
dustry has been profitable.
Strangely enough, in the very
hour when so much is being looked
for from the Government, and at
the very moment when so many nimble-minded
political gentlemen are
forecasting the Utopia that is to
come with a socialistic form of gov
ernment, we find that the two great
needs of American industry, najmely
dyes and potash, have recorded their
industial achievement by the route
of private initiative. Just as the
great transcontinental railroads were
built by American capitalists, to meet
the needs of a rapidly expanding pop
ulation, and just as electric power
and waterways, and ten thousand
first-class miracles in industry and
business were brought about by the
initiative of human beings seeking
fame and fortune, so has the great
problem with reference to potash
been solved by American genius and
enterprise.
A Blind Man Could Tell!
We wonder how many of our
readers have noticed the difference
between the man who has been mar
ried but a short time and one who
has been (married several years.
You can always tell a young hus
band from an old one. When aman
has been married a few months you
will generally see him working in
the garden or fixing up about the
house and while he works he whis
tles, or sings, or occasionally looks
up toward the window to see if any
one is watching him. A year later
he is still working in the garden,
but the smile has been exchanged
for a frown and he occasionally
looks up toward the house wondering
why in thunder breakfast is not
ready . Another year rolls by and his
looks would sour milk, but he is still
at wrork, stopping occasionally to
kick the dog or throw a brick at the
cat. The next year, we find him sit
ting on the porch smoking a pipe
while his wife does the digging in
the garden. Now just watch our
young men, as one by one they are
caught in Cupid's net and see if this
rule does not work out the problem
correctly.
o
Blighty which means home to
British Tommies, comes from Belaiti
a Hindoo word meaning the seat of
government.
o
Canada has learned that vocational
training reduces the disabled man's
period of convalescence to a minimum.
HOW MUCH
Would You. Give
Germany
to Kncrw the Price
Must Pay?
The next three months most likely will determine the terms to be imposed by the
Allies for the four and more years of Hunnish Horror inflicted upon the world.
For Only $1.40
You can keep fully posted on-every day's developments of the great history-makingr
Paris Peace Conference
by making a trial subscription for three months to
The Daily Courier-Journal
"For Almost a Century The Great Morning Newspaper"
MLLERSBURG
Mrs. M. B. Martin continues
about the same. ""
Miss McGuire, of Lexington,
was the guest of Mrs. Louise Wood,
Monday and Tuesday.
Quite a number from here at
tended the Centenary meeting at the
Paris iMethodist Church, Wednes
day. Regular meeting of Amity
Lodge No. 40, P. and A. M Tues
day, at 7:30 p. m. All members
urged to be present.
Mr. O. M. Johnson, while step
ping over a wire fence on his farm
Monday, severely sprained one ankle,
and has since been confined to his
home.
Lieut, and Mrs. Richard Huff
man arrived from Camp Sill, Okla.,
Tuesday. Lieut. Huffman has been
mustered out of the service, and at
present they are at the home of his
mother, Mrs. Mary L. Huffman.
Rev. J. M. Helm, of Parkersburg,
W. Va., will preach at the Christian
church Sunday morning and even
ing, January 26, and every night
during the week thereafter. The pub
lic is cordially invited to attend
these services.
Mrs. E. T. Beeding and son,
Mr. Waddell Beeding, left Tuesday
for Jacksonville, Fla,, where they
will join their husband and father,
Mr. E. T. Beeding. Mr. Waddell
Beeding has accepted a position as
bookkeeper in a merchantile estab
lishment in that city.
Mrs. Fannie Morris and Mr.
Bess Mastin were quietly united in
marriage at Paris, Wednesday after
noon. It is the second matrimonial
venture for the bride, and the third
for the groom. Mrs. Morris is the
mother of two children, her eldest
son being about seventeen years of
age. Mr. Mastin is the father of
four children, three daughters and
one son. All are quite young. Mr.
Mastin is in the employ of Mr. D. E.
Clarke.
o
RELIGIOUS.
Mr. Rupert Blue, Surgeon Gen
eral of the Public Health Service, has
asked the clergymen of the country
to set aside Febreuary 9 as Health
Sunday to preach sermons emphasiz
ing the responsibility of the nation
to protect returning soldiers and
saliors and help combat social dis
eases. At the instance of the Commis
sion of the Protestant Episcopal
Church on the World Conference on
Faith and Order, the protestant
churches of the world are asked to
observe the week beginning Sunday,
January 19, as a world-wide week of
prayer. The object of this special
week of prayer is to secure the pray
ers, both public and private, of Chris
tian unity of all denominations.
Every Methodist pastor, and the
"live wire" key man of each church
within Ohio, Southern Indiana and
Kentucky, are expected to attend the
Centenary Convention of the Cincin
nati area, at Memorial Hall, Colum
bus, O., January 22; 23 and 24. The
gathering will be one of the greatest,
if not the greatest, meeting of Meth
odists ever held within this area.
The church has set out to secure
pledges of ?80, 000,000 to be paid
within the .next five years, to carry
on extensive work at home and
abroad. Conditions created by the
world war have been taken into
careful account in the program.
"But the deepest significance of the
Centenary goes far beyond the rais
ing of a great sum of money," say its
leaders. f
LOST.
On Main street, between Tenth,
and the Fair Store, Saturday after
noon, a bracelet watch. Finder will
be suitably rewarded by returning to
this office. (adr)
FOUND
On Tenth street, a rubber boot
(left) with wool-lined moccasin in
side. Owner can secure same by call
ing at Wilmoth & Co.'s grocery
proving property, and paying
charges. (20-tf)
Unrivaled Foreign News supplied by
.Arthur B. Krock, staff correspond
ent in Paris; The New York Times
cable and wireless service; Associ
ated Press night and day cables.
News of every description reported
through Associated Press and an
army of special correspondents in
every important national and State
news center.
National and State Politics by Courier-Journal
Bureau staff corres
pondents at Washington and
Frankfort and special representa
tives at Indianapolis and Nashville.
Unsurpassed Editorials, Markets,
Sports, Society and features , for
every member of the family ev
erything a dependable, progressive,
satisfying daily newspaper should
print.
Cascarets Work
While You Sleep
No headache, biliousness, up
set stomach on constipa
tion tomorrow
Spend 10 cents feel grand. To
night take Cascarets to liven your
liver and clean your bowels. Stop
the headaches, bilious spells, sour
ness,, gases, coated tongue, bad
breath, sallowness and constipation.
Take Cascarets and enjoy the nicest,
gentlest "inside cleansing" you ever
experienced. Wake up feeling fine.
Cascarets is best cathartic for chil
dren. Tastes like candy. No disap
pointment! Thirty million boxes of
this harmless, fajmous cathartic are
sold each year now. (adv)
t
READ THE DAILY COURIER - JOURNAL
There is a Courier-Journal agent in your town. Give him your order NOW, or use the coupon be
low fof.a special 3-months' trial daily subscription at $1.40 to any point in Kentucky or to points
within 150 miles of Louisville, in Indiana, Tennessee and other States (first and second postal
zones.);, A free sample copy will be mailed on request.
If the Courier Journal is wanted for more than three months, change the subscription blank below
or give ycrar order to The Courier-Journal agent. If any evening paper is preferred, substitute The
Louisville Times for The Daily Courier-Journal at the same price. A g
The Courier-Journal has rearranged its mail service so papers w3I reach distribution points for de
livetyrto points on practically all H. F. D. routes the morning of publication.
rx
MAIL SUBSCRIPTION BATES :
TRIAL ORDER BLANK
THE COURIER-JOURNAL, -M
Louisville, Ky. Date 1919.
Send The Daily Courier-Journal for three (3) months,
under your trial subscription offer to: i
fame
Street or
R. F. D.
I
i
No.
O State
Also send Sunday Courier-Journal.
(If Sunday paper is not wanted mark out line above.)
,pemittance enclosed for $
MILY C0UBIER JOUKNAL:
Year. 6 Mo. 3 Mo.
Kentucky and first and
second zones $5.00 $2.60 $1.40
DAILY AND SUNDAY:
Kentucky and first and and
second zones $7.5$ $3.90 $2.00
Urst and second zones prices apply
to all subscriptions in Kentucky and
witjiin a radius of 150 miles of the
city of Louisville in other States ;
prices for third to eighth zones are
slightly higher.
TZ
gJ5B3t;i
COAT
WEEK
Ladies', Misses and
Children's
1-3 to 1-2
U
Sec Widow
plays.
OFF
Dis-
Twin Bros.
Department Store
Main and 7th Paris, Ky.
Tn- Wm-d4 MilWM
CONSTIPATION AND INDIGESTION
"I have used Chamberlain's Tab
lets and must say they are the host
I have ever used for constipation
and indigestion. My wife also uted
them for indigestion and they did
her good," writes Eugene S. Knight,
Wilmington, N. C. Obtainable every
where.
(jan-adv)
o
I can remember when people did
not think of advancing any other
excuse for going down town New
Year's Eve except a desire to listen
to the chimes of Old Trinity.
WOMEN OP SEDENTERY HABITS
Women who get little exercise ere
likely to be troubled with constipa
tion and indigestion and will find
Chamberlain's Tablets highly bene
ficial. Not so good as a three or four
mile walk every day, but very much
better than to allow the bowels to
remain in a constipated condition.
They are easy and pleasant to take
and most agreeable in effect. Ob
tainable everywhere.
(jan-adv)
Lost Reward.
On the streets of Paris, a small
Coral Dress Pin. Finder leave at the
Paris Book Store and receive re
ward. (14-3t)
Furs and Hides
We pay highest prices for iron
hides, junk and wool.
MUNICH & WIDES & CO.,
Eighth St., Paris, Ky.,
Cumb. Phone 374.
(23-tf)
To Parents
You rush your child to the den
tist when he has a toothache. Most
of you don't wait for actual trouble,
but bank on regular examination and
care to prevent it.
But how about your son's and
daughter's eyes? Are they perfect?
Are you sure they are not handi
capped because of faulty vision?
The general health and work in
school of almost nine out of ten
children can be improved 50 per
cent, by properly fitted glasses.
Let us examine your child's eye3.
No guess work we know how.
Dr. Wm. Riley Franklin
Suite 205-6 First National Bank,
Both Phones, Paris, Ky.
WANTED!
At Highest Market Price,
Strictly First Class
Buttermilk
Eggs
Butter
and Poultry
The Busy
Cash Store.
janl4-4t) ,
ATTENTION
All 1918 accounts are now due.
Those owing me are requested to
please call and settle at ONCE. Those
accounts not settled ipnmediately will
be placed in the hands of an attorney
for collection.
(14-3t) J. ELVOVE.
FOR RENT.
Store room, fronting on Main
street in Masonic Temple.
Single room, second floor, running
water, elevator acommodations, for
office use or living apartpient.
0. T. HIHT0N,
Agt., Masonic Temple.
REMOVAL
NOTICE
Cows
For Sale!
I have 3 extra fine heavy Jersey
springers, second calf, one wilt be
fresh at once, for sale.
If not sold privately, will sell
publicly on Saturday at the Lower
Livery Stable.
If you want a good cow, this is
your chance.
(14-2t) FRANK P. COLLIER.
On and After January 15th My
Store Location Will Be
622 S. Main Street
Between Baldwin Bros, and
Chas. Monson's Grocery.
This room is much better
suited to my business and more
convenient to my trade.
A NEW STOCK
Will Be Added
and I will be much better pre
pared to wait on my increasing
business.
Your patronage will be appre
ciated. DR. 0. L. FRYE
JEWELER AID)
(janl0-4t) '
OPTOMETRIST.
Public Sale of 75 Acres of
Fine Suburban Unimproved Land
SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 1919, AT 2 O'CLOCK P. M.
We will sell at public auction, at the Court House door. 75 acres of land on the Mays
ville pike, one-fourth mile from the city limits of Paris, and adjoining the William and Lou
Taylor lind3r
This farni is good, deep soil, with lots of tobacco land. Twenty-five acres now in blue
grass and about fifty acres now in timothy. There is an ideal building site on the Mays-
vilje pike, and the neighborhood is the very best No tobacco was ever grown on this land.
Plenty of good water never failing spring that furnishes good water at all times.
TERMS Easy and will be made known on day of sale. . .
For particulars, apply to the undersigned. -"
HARRIS & SPEAKES,
GEO. D. SPEAKES, Auctioneer GEORGE R. BELL
Agents
L. D. HARRIS, Manager

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