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The Bourbon news. [volume] (Paris, Ky.) 1895-19??, November 04, 1919, Image 1

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THE BOURBON NEWS
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VOLUME XXXVIII
PARIS, BOURBON COUNTY, KENTUCKY, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 4 1919
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Sit
THE STATE ELECTION
To-day, Tuesday, November 4, the
voters of Kentucky will determine
at the polls whether the Democratic
party shall be continued in power or
the State government 'turned over to
the control of the Republicans. It
js a momentous decision, which no
man should make without careful
consideration of the issues involved,
the qualifications of the opposing
candidates, and the influences be
hind them.
Ordinarily, national issues may be
disiegarded in the selection of State
officers, and should be if the local
issues are of paramount importance,
hut such is not the case in this elec
tion. The Republican platform
promises no reforms which the Dem
ocrats have not already undertaken,
or are pledged to enact. The sole
question presented, therefore, is
which of the two parties can be safely
trusted to redeem its promises the
Democrats or the Republicans.
To determine this question, reflect
for a moment on the constituent ele
ments of the two parties. The Dem
ocratic party admittedly contains the
large majority of the intelligent cit
izens of the State, who own the bulk
of the property, and consequently
pay the preponderant proportion of
the taxes. It is equally true that
there are many good men and true
and substantial taxpayers in the
ranks of the Republican party, but
they are in a hopeless minority, and
their party's chances of success at
the polls would be negligible if the
negroes and the illiterate mountain
whites were eliminated from the
equation.
Considered from either point of
view. State or National, the argu
ment for the election of the Demo
cratic State ticket is unanswerable,
and unless we badly miss our guess
the voters will so decide it to-day.
Go to the polls early this morning
and by your vote help to keep the
reins of the State government in the
hands of Gov. James D. Black and
his able assistants.
GrODD PBICES REALIZED AT THE t
THOMPSON SALE.
Good prices ruled, at the public
sale of stock, crop, farming imple
ments etc., of I. D. Thompson, con
ducted Friday morning by Auo
tioneer George D. Speakes. There
was a good attendance, and the bid
ding on nearly everything offered
was spirited. Cows sold tor $90to
$162.50; sheep, $22 to $26; sows,
$25 to $40; sows with, pigs, $35 to
$40: fat hogs, $35 to $40; shoats,
9.50 each; one mule, $165, one
pair mules, $475; two-year-old
horse, $125; yearling Percheron
horse, $100; corn sold for $5.75 per
"barrel, to be taken without grading
us to soundness; straw, $6 to $9.50
a ton. The farming implements
brought good prices.
&
FRANK & CO.
LADIES' OUTFITTERS
SPECIAL
SALE
OF
WAISTS
$1.10
r
"-$
FRANK
LADIES' OUTFITTERS
Automobile Delivery -
Y. M. C. AGAMPAEGN STARTS
WITH $7,050.
The initial movement in the $10,
000 drive for the local Y. M. C. A.,
was carried forward successfully at
the meeting held in the Grand Opera
House, in this city, Sunday after
noon, when the sum of $7,050 was
raised for the fund." The building, as
at previous meetings, was crowded
from wall to wall, and standing room
only was available to late-comers.
Mr. John T. Collins, who has at
tained par excellence as a master of
ceremonies, presided at the meeting,
and kept matters going along. The
business meeting was preceded by a
concert by the famous Boys' and
Girls' Band, of Maysville, an organi
zation composed of thirty-five young
men and two pretty young missesr
under the direction of Bandmaster
Purdon. The band made an excel
lent impression, their program
stamping them as masters of their
instruments. Every number was
liberally applauded, to which the
band responded with encores. Con
sidering the time the organization
has been in existence, and the tender
age of some of the musicians, the
band is a wonder, and would do
credit to a much more pretentious
place or leadership. The work of the
band was supplemented by vocal
solos beautifully rendered by Capt,
Robt. Harbeson, whose superb tenor
voice has often been heard here.
Rev. Robert Nooe, pastor of the
Frankfort Christian church, who
had been in the Y. M. C. A. service
overseas, addressed the audience,
giving a stirring and interesting
story of his experiences in the work
in the war zone. Rev. Nooe is an
inspiring and magnetic speaker, and
held the undivided attention of his
audience to the end.
Whetf the call came for subscrip
tion for the fund, the response was
ready and liberal, pledges coming
in amounts ranging from $500 down
to small sunms of $2 and $1. The
contributions totalled $7,050.50.
The committee made the announce
ment that the work would proceed
until the entire amount had been
secured. Several hundred names
were enruneu. uu cue nat ui yicugea
taken at the meeting Sunday, and
additional names will be added from
day to day.
Solicitors for the campaign fund
were busy among the farmers on the
streets yesterday, and succeeded in
adding the sum of $800 to the above,
bringing the total to $7,850. They
found the farmer ready and willing
to contribute to the fund, and many
who contributed stated that they
would make it a point to see their
neighbors .and stir them up.
o
PREPARE WHILE YOU CAN ; COLD
WEATHER COMING.
Our car-load of stoves and heaters
have arrived. Buy now. Have them
put up while you can.
(28-tf) A. F. WHEELER & CO.
5.
& CO.
"-?i
'?&&:
NOVEMBER FLOODS SWEEP
BOURBON COUNTY STBEAMS .
Following a week of rains, during
whicli time the precipitation of
moisture was far above the normal
supply, the streams of Bourbon
county, both large and small, 'took
an added burden of water on them
selves, with the result that the No
vember "rise," 'totally unexpected,
caused considerable damage- through
out the county. l
StoiTer and houston creeks and
their tributaries were greatly
swollen as a result of the continued
rains and people living in the low
lands were forced to remove their
household goods to higher ground.
Especially was this the cause in 'the
colored suburbs of Ruckerville.
Building material, fencing, logs,
driftwood of all kinds, swept down
the muddy current of Stoner for two
days. The climax was reached
when a live hog, crated for ship
ment, was rescued from the tuijbid
waters of Houston creek, little worse
for the experience. The water
passed the level of the new dam at
the Paris Milling Co.'s plant on Sat
urday and continued to rise until
the reaction of the cold spell on Sun
day set it on the back track.
A farmer who attempted to cross
the north fork of Brush creek, near
Little Rock, was compelled to aban
don his machine. The rise of the
waters was so rapid that when lie
left the scene only' a few inches "of
the tow was showing. Townsend
creek was so high that the rural
mail carrier serving that section of
the county could not cross and had
to turn back. On Saturday two of
the city mail carriers had to turn
hack on account of the high waters
in their territory. Back water from
Houston creek Saturday afternoon
reached Houston avenue and reached
the first floors of residences. Water
invaded the first floor of the Paris
Milling Co.'s plant, the flour stock
having to be moved to higher quar
ters to prevent its being water soak
ed. Sandy Bottom and other lowland
parts of the city suffered from the
invasion of waters. The Bourbon
County Health & Welfare League
through its Visiting Nurse, Mrs.
Harriet Minaker, promptly investi
gated all cases of distress and gave
relief to the unfortunate.
The interurban service between
Paris and outside points was not as
badly interfered with as it might
have been under the circumstances,
the cars running fairly close to
schedule time. T-he greatest trouble
was experienced near Paris, due to
the water overflowing from Hous
ton creek, covering the road. '
An uncompleted section of the big
dam on the Xalapa Farm of Edward
Simms, near Paris, was washed
away, together with the boxing and
a large amount of other lumber that
had been used in the construction
of the dam.
The rainy spell has been the heav
iest for many years, causing some
damage. Tobacco all over the coun
ty has been injured, as well as corn
in the shock. Several of the county
pikes -were rendered almost impas
sahle. o-
RED CROSS ROLL CALL CAM
PAIGN PROGRESSING.
Committees of- ladies representing
the Bourbon County Red Cross Chap
ter began the work yesterday of can
vassing the city in the interest of
the Third Red Cross Roll Call for
membership in the county organiza
tion. The only requisite for mem
bership is "a dollar and a heart."
Honor Roll sheets are being dis
tributed to all the business houses in
the city. Valuable assistance is be
ing rendered in this respect and in
the distribution of advertising mat
ter by the members of the Girl
Scouts organization. The negro pre
cincts in the city will be taken care
of by members of the American Le
gion. Reports of the work will be
given in by Thursday night. The
campaign through the county for
membership will be conducted by
committees under the direction of
Mrs. Hiram Roseberry, to-morrow,
Wednesday, November 5.
Be ready with your dollar when
when the solicitors come aiound. If
you haven't a heart, have the dol
lar ready anyhow, and turn it over
to the Red Cross with a right good
will in a light good cause.
. o
SUES
FOR COMPENSATION
REAL ESTATE DEAL
ON
Charles P. Mann, representing the
Paris Realty Co., has filed suit in the
office of Circuit Clerk Wm. H. Webb
against B. M. Renick, president "of
the Paris Milling Co., asking for a
judgment for $260 as compensation
for selling the residence of Mr. Ren
ick, on Duncan avenue, to Hiram
Redmon, for $14,000.
The petition alleges that after Mr.
Mann, representing the Paris Realty
Co., had made the sale, Mr. Renick
refused to sign the agreement, and
that the deal in consequence, of such
action, fell through.
INTERURBAN CAR STRIKES AND
DAMAGES TRUCK.
While backing out into the street
at the corner of Main and Sixteenth
yesterday morning a large motor
truck belonging to E. F. Spears. &
Sons, driven by Charles Day, was
was struck by the 9:45 interurban
ca from Lexington. The rear end
of the big truck was smashed. Day
escaped -injury. He claims he did
not hear the car.coming and was un
aware ofatsf being so close to him
until the truckand car metan- wi
A FINAL APPEAL TO BOURBON
DEMOCRATS
Although this issue of THE -NEWS
appears on the day of the State elec
tion, we want to make a final ap
peal to all Democrats of the county,
as well as all Independents and pa
triotic Republicans to let nothing
prevent them from going to the polls
and casting their vote for the entire
Democratic ticket.'
We urge this, not alone because
we are a Democrat, but because we
honestly believe there is more to
hope for from the Democratic ticket,
in the way of eftlcient State govern
ment, than from the Republican
ticket. In the first place, the peo
ple chose the Democratic ticket,
While a few Republican leaders
choose their ticket. Gov. Black heads
one ticket, Mr. Morrow the other.
We have nothing unkind to say
about Mr. Morrow. We know him
as a pleasant gentleman and a fin
ished speaker of unusual force, but
no one will seriously contend that
he is the equal of Gov. Black in
business or executive capacity. He
has had no experience in either,
while Gov. Black has been a success
in both. Then, too, the State Senate
will undoubtedly be Democratic, in
fact, there are enough hold-over
Democratic members and nominees
without opposition to insure this,
and how could the people expect
real service with a Republican Gov
ernor, and a Democratic Senate and
House?
Governor Black is a clean, Chris
tian gentleman of high ideals and
purposes, and will make Kentucky a
conscientious, dependable conserva
tive and capable Chief Executive.
We therefore hope and confidently
believe he will be returned the win
ner by a splendid majority. Stamp
your ballot under -the rooster to
day, "that's the way!"
- z --o-i . ..
CHILDREN'S HOME ' CANVASS
PROGRESSING THIS WEEK
Is a homeless Kentucky boy or
girL worth, the price of a smoke?
And if it is, are you willing to
back up your conviction to the. ex
tent of a dime the price of a cigar?
These questions are asked of every
person in the State by the Kentucky
Children's Home Society, in an en
deavor to raise $300,000 in a fifty
day campaign, for the purpose of
building a village of cottages on a
farm, ten miles from Louisville, near
St. Mathews.
As a. reminder of what the desti
.tpjBhildren, who- had been reared
by the Society, have done to pay
their debt to the State, the children
now in the care of the Society,
proudly point to their service flag
that contains 130 stars, representing
the number of elder boys who
shouldered the gun against the Hun.
Five of the number gave their lives
for the cause; ten won commissions,
and one of the young ladies went to
France as a Red Cross nurse.
The Society does not deal with the
defective children of the State, but
only with those who are normal,
mentally and physical, and shapes
them during the formative period' of
life into good and useful citizens.
During more than twenty years of its
history the Kentucky Children's
Home Society received from the va
rious counties of the State on orders
from county judges about 3,000
children, several hundred of whom
are now grown men and women in
various avocations of life and an
honor to the State and institution.
o
NOTED HYPNOTIST TO APPEAR
HERE WEDNESDAY
Galvani, the noted hypnotist, who
is probably known to as many, if not
more theatre goers than any per
former now before the public, has
been engaged to fill an engagement
in the Grand Opera House for three
niglits, commencing Wednesday
evening, November 5.
On Tuesday night he will place a
man in dream land in the display
window at E. M. Wheeler's store to
sleep until awakened Wednesday
evening on the stage.
It will be remembered that Gal
vani is the man who gained much
notoriety in this section when he
hypnotized Wm. M. Damron, who
was at that time Governor of West
Virginia.
Galvani has been before the pub
lic for 23 years, and is considered a
wonder. He has directed that ladies
be admitted absolutely free Wednes
day evening.
o
VOTE EARLY TO-DAY.
"Vote early" is the slogan of the
city precinct officers in the election
to-day, as well as workers in the
bond issue campaign..
With four separate ballots to
handle a great deal of extra labor
will be forced on officers of election.
In order that every ballot may be
counted voters are asked to go to the
polls early and await their turns,
giving the clerks a steady flow of
Tsork during the day.
Expediting the work of handling
the election to-day will be a patri
otic duty.
o
JTNED FOR HUNTING RABBITS
OUT OF SEA5UJN.
In the County Court, yesterday,
County Judge George Batterton,
assessed fines of $23.50 each against
Ora Owens and Albert Cameron,
of the Ruddles Mills vicinity
on charges of violating the game
laws". The men entered pleas of
cruiltv to hunting rabbits out of sea
son: The arrests were made by;l
County. Game - .Warden - Douglas-
QUESTIONS PUT UP TO ED. MOR
ROW SATURDAY NO ANSWER.
Does Mr. Morrow approve the vic
ious and incendiary denunciation of!
the President of the United States
and the processes of the law?
Is Mr. Morrow fnr or arainst ti
Federal government in its course
with relation to the coal strike?
Does Mr. Morrow believe the coal
strike either lawful or justifiable?
Will he knowingly accept the sup
port sought for him in a circular
sent out Friday by the Republican
Campaign Committee, and thus ac
knowledge his subserviency to a
spirit of lawlessness and intoler
ance? Mr. Morrow is as dumb as an oys
ter respecting the great national and
international issue, the ratification
of the peace treaty. But he accepts
the support of those who stand ready
to hail his election as a repudiation
of the treaty by the people of Ken
tucky. He stands branded as a moral
coward, as a time-serving, vote-seeking
political trimmer, by his attitude
on this issue.
His supporters in Bell county
precipitated a new and much graver
issue because it more directly con
cerns the business and the hearth
stone of a large proportion of the
people of Kentucky.
Will Mr. Morrow permit himself
to be branded as a second time as a
moral coward?
Will he stand dumb in the face of
Uie vociferous incendiarism of Bell
county supporters?
o
GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. SUED
FOR DAMAGES.
Suit for $30,000 damages for the
death of his son, John Webb, has
been filed in the office of Circuit
Clerk Wm. H. Wehb, by James
Webb, administrator, through his at
torneys, Talbott & Whitley, of Paris.
The case will probably be heard at
the November term of the Bourbon
Circuit Court.
In the petition filed by the attor
neys in the case it is alleged that in
September 25, 1919, young Wehb,
while in the employ of the Cumber
land Telephone Co., aV , ijnfi?,
was, with the knowledge if oojt
sent of the Paris Gas & TGkctric Co.,
allowed to climb a pole belonging to
the Electric Co. to adjust some High
voltage wires, which were rubbing
against the telephone company's
wires. - While so- engaged, itis aHeg
ed he came in contact with a part
of the high voltage wires which
were not properly insulated, and re
ceived a current of electricty through
his body which caused death. The
plaintiff claims it was through
the gross negligence and carelessness
of the Electric Co. and its agents and
employes that his son was killed.
Webb is survived by his widow and
one child.
WE KNOW HOW
s
We Honestly Believe that We are Ren
dering a Service to the Men of Paris in
Recommending and Selling
STMIN-BLOCH
SMART CLOTHES
True economy does not consist of buying arti--cles
because they are low priced. Frequently the
purchase of a low priced suit may prove to be the
greatest extravagance. The measure ot economy
is to be found in the measure of value.
There are are no clothes made where the meas
ure of value is greater than in STEIN-BLOCH
SMART CLOTHES where you will find such a
complete and satisfying combination of tailoring,
style, high quality of material, and all otherjjfactors
that enter into genuine worth.
We know, from our long experience in the
clothing business, that we could offer you no better
clothes at at any price. No better are made. And
it is a great source of satisfaction to us to be able to "
offer such clothes at prices you would ordinarily ex
pect to pay for clothes of inferior quality.
Prices $25.00 to $60.00
MITCHELL &
Stttson Hats
Manhattan Shirts
Dr.
. -..
ANNUAL MEETING OF XEMIXAX
STATE ASSEMBLY.
The annual meeting of tie Sfcai tt
Assembly of the Rebekah. Decree, L -
' O. O. F., for the State of Kemtuetanw " '
will be held this week at the Pkoemix?
Hotel, in Lexington, beginninr-tW- r
! (Tuesday) evening at 8 p. -ltt. wiUt r j
an open session at which MiM.Mit 4 - 1
j ue .IJallon' 0 me Lexington ixoe.
cnairman oi ine uommuiee on. mm.- -
tertainment, will preside. .. Abowt
200 or 250 delegates the expected
Music for this open, session will W
furnished by the Girls' OrekeetrSr
from the Odd Fellows' Home, and "ky
local soloists. A drill, also, will b
given by sixteen girls from the
Home.
Wednesday and Thursday, at 9 a.
m., the business sessions will be call
ed to order by the president, Mrs
Iolene Hawkins, of Flemingsburg:
At 2:30 p. m. Wednesday, the dele
gates to the assembly will visit the
Odd Fellows Home, inspect the plaat '
and enjoye a nentertainment given;
by the children. Wednesday even-
ing, 8 p. m. the floor work of tk
degree will be put on by a visitimy
team. Thursday evening, 8 p ii
the memorial service will he heleV
and the newly elected officers will he
installed. ,
The Rebekah Lodge is the sister
hood of the Independent Order oT
Odd Fellows; one of its chief inter
ests, besides the general moral aC
fraternal priciples of the order. 3m
the maintenance of the Home for
Aged Odd Fellows and Rebekahsv at
Eminence. It aids in the support of"
the Widows' and Orphons' Home,
also.
Paris lodge is represented by Mm,
Ida W. Snyder, delegate, and M
Ollie Chambers, alternate. At tfc
next meeting of the lodge, on Thurs
day night, November 13,. when a so
cial session and luncheon will- s
given, these ladies will make a re
port of the proceedings of the State
Chapter.
o
AT THE PARIS GRAND AND THsT
ALAMO THEATRE -
To-day, Tuesday, November 4 At
the Alamo, afternoon and night m
ladys Brockwell, in "Tne sneaicr
ntonio Moreno and Carol Hpuoway,
in "Perils of Thunder Moumtai;"
Harold Lloyd Comedy, "Heap Biff
Chief." Paris Grand afternoon an
night "Shepherd of The Hills," ist
ten big reels.
I.- -TXT--J J T ?-
"I o-morrow, weaueisua.y, .nuveuw
5 Alamo, afternoon and night
Virginia Pearson, in "The Bishop'a
Emeralds;" Larry Seamon Comedy
"Dull Care;" Bray Pictograph. Pari
Grand, night Galvani, Hypnotist.
Thursday, November 6 Alamo,
afternoon and night Bert Lytell, in
"Lombardi, Ltd," seven reels,
Paris Grand,, night Galvani, Hyp
notist. BLAKEMORE
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