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The Bourbon news. [volume] (Paris, Ky.) 1895-19??, June 10, 1921, Image 1

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PUBLISHED EVERY. TUESDAY AND FRIDAY IN THE YEAR.
VOLUME XLI
PARISBOURBON COUNTY, KENTUCKY, FRIDAY, JUNE 10.1921
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HERO'S FUHERAL TO BE HELD
SUNDAY.
Accompanied by Private Miles E.
Wheatley, of Camp Knox, the body
of Luther Clyde Shanks, victim of
theworld war, which arrived in Lou
isville a few days ago, was brought
to Paris, and was taken to the un
dertaking establishment of Geo. R.
Davis.
Young Shanks enlisted from Bour
bon county in. the U. S. army service
and was after the usual period of
camp training, assigned to Com
pany K., Sixteenth Infantry, and
later sent overseas. He participated
in a number of engagements, and
was wounded by a shell in France
while on the firing line on October
-5, 1918, and died from the injury
on October 18, 1918. The body was
buried temporarily in the American
Cemetery in France, and later sent
to America, arriving at Hoboken,
New Jersey, from where it was sent
to Louisville, then to his old home.
Toung Shanks was the son of Mr.
and Mrs. J. L. Shanks, formerly of
Paris and now residents of Malion,
Indiana.
The funeral will be held Sunday
afternoon in the Methodist church,
where services will be conducted by
Rev. C. H. Gfeer, at three o'clock.
The interment will follow in the
Paris Cemetery, where the committal
exercises will he conducted under au
spices of Bourbon Post, American
Legion, which will pay full military
horors to the departed soldier.
To all members of Bourbon Post,
American Legion: Your presence is
requested at the Court House, in
Paris, on Sunday afternoon, June
1, at 2:00 o'clock, p. fm., to attend
the funeral services and burial of
Luther Clyde Shanks, who died over
seas. WM. COLLINS, Commander.
CANDIDATES TAKE NOTICE!
The "Kentucky Election Law pro
vides that all candidates for county
or magisterial district offices who
desire their names printed on the
official ballot for theprimary of Au-
gust 6, most file their application
with proper affidavit with the Coun
ty Clerk thirty days before the pri
mary, which makes July 7 the last
day for filing. Don't overlook it.
LODGE NOTES
The Frankfort Council, Knights of
Columbus, will celebrate the glorious
Fourth by staging a big basket pic
nic at Dudley's Island, near Frank
fort. Arrangements are being macje
by the committee in charge to mak
-the affair the best Fourth of July
picnic ever 'held there.
o
CEMENT!
HAVE JUST UNLOADED FRESH
CAB CEMEpT.
(22apl-tf) CHAS. S. BRENT & BRO.
ininiiiiMiiiiiiiniiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiumu'u
I
1 FRANK&CO.
LADIES OUTFITTERS
DON'T ,
OVERLOOK
THESE
Taffeta Charmeuse
Tricolette .
and Wool Jersey
-
DRESSES
$15.50
I J.
.
"SHOP AT HOME
FRANK
LADIES' OUTFITTERS
MIlMVnilMMIIiMllllilililMjH
i
SUITS SOU $80,000 AGAINST THE
L-&N,
As an aftermath of the accident
which occurred last March at Mont
rose station, in Fayette county, in
which W. G-. Napier, of- Paris, was
killed, and Ossie Gravitt and William
Bowe, also of Paris, were injured,
three suits against the L. & N. Rail
way Co., aggregating $80,000, have
been filed in the office of ' Circuit
Clerk Wm. H. Webb, in this city,
for hearing at the coming term of
the Bourbon Circuit Court.
Thos. W. Napier; as administra
tor for W. C Napier, sued fo r$40,
000, and Ossie Gravitt and William
Bowe, sued for" $15,000 and $25,000,
respectfully, for injuries sustained
in the accident. The accident oc
curred on March 21, when the men,
in a big motor truck, were attempt
ing, to cross the L. & N. tracks at
Montrose station. They had been
moving some furniture frbm Avon to
Paris in a motor truck belonging' to
Martin Bros., of Paris, after having
gone to Lexington earlier in the day
with a load' of tobacco. Napier was
killed and Gravitt and Bowe injured.
Mr. Napier is represented by Tal
bott & Whitley, while the same firm
will represent Bowe and Gravitt.
PINE BUSINESS CHANCE
A WELL ESTABLISHED GRO
CERY ON MAIN STREET, INCLUD
ING STOCK AND FIXTURES, IS
OFFERED FOR SALE PRIVATELY.
PRESENT OWNER IS GOING TO
LEAVE THE CITY. THIS IS A
FINE CHANCE TO BUY A WELL
PAYING.BUSINESS. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION;
CALL AT NEWS OFFICE.
BOURfeON RAISED COLT
FOR $30,000
SELLS
William A., noted two-year-old,
bred and raised on thee Military
Stock Fawn of John Wiggins, near
Hutchison, in this county, was sold
a few days ago in New York to the
Rancocas Stable for the princely
sum of $30,000. Mr. Wiggins dis
posed of the horse in his yearling
form for $1,500. He was later sold
for $2,100, and now. goes to another
owner for $30,000.
William A. has shown as one of
the best juveniles raced in the East
this year, and his development
might well serve as a chapter
the East this year, and his develop
ment might well serve as a chapter
in the ups and downs of thorough
bred ownership. He is by Jack.Aikin
Thera, by Nastertium. The colt
worked five and one-half furlongs at
Belmont Park recently in 1:07, going
the final eighth in 1:00. Mr. Wig
gins is exceedingly proud of the rec
ord the colt has made and says he
is very sorry he had hot sold some
other one from his place and kept
William A., in the Jight of recent de
velopments. t
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SCHOOL NOTES
A large number of the Paris City
School teachers will spend the sum
med in different summer scfiools in
the north and east, while quite a few
will be in the Kentucky "summer
schools. Miss Ellen Blanding, super
visor of music, will spend the sum
mer at Cornell University, Ithica, N.
Y.; Miss Reba Lockhart, teacher of
(history, and Miss Elizabeth Rotf,
teacher, of Latin, at the University
of Chicago; Miss Bess ,Purnell,ja.t
George Washington ' University,
Washington, D. C; Miss Julia
Clarke, at University of Colorado;
Miss Yeager, University of Pennsyl
vania; Miss Ranson, University of
Kentucky Miss Maude Taylor, Uni
versity of Tennessee ; Mrs. Stone,
Mrs. Fishback, Misses Brannon, Far
rell, Rice, Talbott, and Whaley, will
spend the -summer in the Kentucky
University Summer School in. Paris,.
Miss Lucille Harbold, graduate of
Kentucky State University, who has
been selected to assist in the Depart
ment of Latin and , English, will
spend the summer in Columbia Uni
versity, New x York City, where she
is taking her M. A. Degree in Eng
lish. Paris High School will open Mon
day, September 6, 1921, with twelve
High School teachers trained in the
best colleges' and universities in
America.
When the City School opens in
September the Commercial Depart
ment will be ready with a larger pro
gram than was offered this year.
'Miss Margie Kelly, who directed the
department so ably tms year, win
again be in charge of the work, and
will have sufficient assistance to en
able her to take care of all High
School students who want commer
cial work, and all adults in the city
and county who want to take any
commercial courses.
During the summer private com
mercial school solicitors come into
this territory and sign up people for
courses which are often very expen
sive, and we -desire to call the atten
tion of all to the fact that the Paris
City Schools are offering a compre
hensive course in commercial work,
and ask you if you are interested in
this kind of work, wait until Septem
ber 6 and enroll in your home insti
tution. Arrangements will be made
whereby adult students' who come
into the school for part time work
can advance just as rapidly as their
ability will enable them.
The largest class in the history .f
the1 Paris schools numbering one hun
dred and thirty-seven, heard an able
and instructive address delivered at
the High School building in this
city, Wednesday morning, by Gegrg
Colvin, State Superintendent of Pub
lic Instruction. Mr. Colvin commend
ed the parents who had kept their
children in school up to this point
in their lives and asked each to let
his child' continue on through High
School and colleges. He paid an elo
quent tribute to the teachers who
had consecrated their lives to the
calling which he considers higher
than motherhood and praised the ef
forts of County Superintendent J. B.
Caywood in making a class of this
size possible. Mr. Colvin also com
mended the county and the city
Boards of Education and Superin
tendent of Schools -Lee Kirkpatrick.
The invocation was delivered by
Rev. T. S. Smylie, and the address
of welcome was delivered by Prof.
Kirkpatrick. The medal for the
highest average in the county exam
inations, irrespective of residence,
was awarded by Silas E. Bedford, of
the Peoples' Deposit Bank, to Miss
Mary Ewalt Clay, whose average was.
94 5-11. For the highest average
in the city and county the medals
were awarded by the county examin
ers, Prof. Kirkpatrick and Mrs. Robt.
Bell, to Misses Dorothy Pepper and
Lillian Donaldson, respectively. The
diplomas were presented by Prof. J.
W. Lancaster, of the Millersburg
Graded School.
jJ
SCISSORS SHARPENING A
SPECIALTY
Having installed a modern' sharp
ening machine we are prepared to
sharpen scissors, knives or cutlery of
any kind accurately. .This is one of
the best machines, ever made and
puts on a true bevel edge and sharp
est cutting surface. Call on us.
HONICAN BROS." BARBER SHOP.
(10-2t) Ninth and Main.
o
Fire, Wind and Lightning Insur
ance. THOMAS, WOODFORD & BRYAN
CLANGING EIRE ENGINE IS DAN
GER WARNING
Fire hydrants and clanging fire
bells should be safety warnings to
cautious motorists.
Keep away from fire hydrants.
Not only because it's against the lav
to park close to them. In case of
fire nearby, a car too near a hydrant
must be. moved and the firemen are
not slow or careful about it either.
Locked cars, pushed away in a hurry,
are in danger of injury.
Fire bells heard while driving are
a warning to move to the right im
mediately and stop. Never look to
see which way the fire trucks are
coming. Stop immediately and there
wilrte no accident.
Even where there is no ordinance
against parking in narrow streets, jt
would-be safer for auto drivers not
to park there. Fire routes are usu
ally not through narrow streets, but
anything might happen to force fire
trucks to take such streeti. And' a'
fast-moving engine i a narrow street
irats the 'cars, cursed alongside ,in
danger of destruction. T,
DEATH OF A. T. BERT LOSS TO
STATE
nJt' ?:, Hert' Republican National
committeeman for Kentucky, died at
the New Willard Hotel, in Washing
ton, at 4:15 o'clock Tuesday after
noon. A physician was summoned
JKlyiT??,da mornng.- Finding
that Mr. Hert had a high blood pres
sure, he advised him to rest
Immediatelyprior to his" death
which resulted from apoplexy, he had
been resting in bed in a half-sitting
posture deep in discussion of polit
ical appointments with Congressman
John W. Langley, Tenth Kentucky
wisLnut, ana j. Matt UMlton, Jeffer-
son county attorney. Congressman
o. m. itODinson, Eleventh Kentucky Plaintiffi .asserts that the automo
District, was announced. Mr. HeTrtbile in which she was riding was
fT6136"11111- Turn-1 hurled fromlhe road and she wS
b 1.7, .: v"a ivir. xiert Degan j
to chide him about a minor political
appointment in which he and Mr.
Robinson were interested. But hi3
laugh turned to a cry of pain, and
he fell back upon the bed. Two
minutes later he was dead.
Hurried efforts were being made
to obtaon a physician when Dr. R.
Lyman Sexton, who had treated Mr.
Hert, Tuesday morning, happened
in. He pronounced Mr. .Hert dead.
Even had the physician been on hand
at the beginning of the attack. Mr.
Hert's death could not have been
prevented, he said.
Mr. Hert had remained in bed
Tuesday -and was sitting up while
he was holding the conference in
the afternoon. Several of those nres-
ent suggested that they let matters J
wait until Wednesdayj but Mr. Hert
declaring that he was feeling well,Rankin machine were colored pfeo
insisted on disposing of them Tues- pie. The cab driver hearing the
day afternoon. In the morning he crash as the machines came together,
had seen several visitors and had I came back and told the Paris party
disposed of some political matters, what he had observed. Mr. Thomp-
George Lund, 'Mr. Hert's valet,
purchased railroad tickets for the re
turn to Kentucky, Thursday. Mr.
Hert had told Mrs. Hert that he
would return and was anxious that
he should not have to prolong his
stay in Washington, Lund said.
In addition to his widow, Mrs.
Sally Aley Hert, whom he married
in Bedford, Ind., Nov. 20, 1893, Mr.
Hert is survived by two sisters, Mrs.
Harold L. Arnold, Los Angeles, and
Mrs. Grace Fields, Bloomington, Ind.
His parents are dead and a sister and
two brothers have died in recent
years.
The body arrived in Louisville,
Wednesday night. The funeral will
take place from Hurstbourne Farnl
at 4 o'clock this (Friday afternoon,
preliminary to. the burial in Bedford,
Ind., Mr. Hert's native -home. "
Mr, Jlert became nationally known
after ""becoming Kentucky's member
of the Republican. National Commit
tee five years ago. 'Hcwas a factor
in bringing about the nomination of
Harding at the Chicago convention.
He was considered for a time for a
Cabinet post.. While he was not ap
pointed to the Cabinet, Mr. Harding
sought to tender him a diplomatic
post, he declined, because he did not
desire to leave this country, even
temporarily.
o
NOTES FROM THE , NATIONAL
GAME.-
By a vote of five to one the Car
lisle City Council, at a recent meet"
ing, went on recoru as uemg vyyvaw
to Sunday baseball. A-committee of
women appeared before the Council
and urged the adoption of an ordi
nance prohibiting Sunday games.
Mrs. Henry M. Potts stated that
while she was opposed to Sunday
baseball the city should provide
some kind of 'Sunday afternoon en
tertainment for young men. An ordi
nance was prepared and voted on
resulting in its adoption.
At the West Second street
park Sunday afternoon the Paris
Ruggles team and the Winchester
team will p'-y. The game will be
called promptly at 2:30 o clock.
TtiV Winchester team has been play
ing fast ball this season, having met
and defeated some of the beat sem
professional teams in oeiurai Ken
tucky. The Paris team will have a
strong team in action Sunday after
noon, to support Caparoni, who will
be on the mound. Manager Crider
says patrons of the sport-re promis
ed a good exhibition of ball playing.
Last Sunday's game, when Paris de
feated the Lexington team by a nar
row margin of one run has put new
life in the locals and will help to
boost the Sunday attendance.
Owing to the expense the club
been under in securing new players
an admission charge of twenty-five
cents will be made for ladies.
o
ATTENTION, BOURBON POST
' AMERICAN LEGION
To All Members of Bourbon Post,
American Legion: Your presence is
requested at the Court House, in
Paris, on Sunday afternoon, June 12,
at 2:00 p. m. o'clock, to attend the
funeral servibes and burial of
Luther Clyde Shanks, who died over
seas. I
WM. COLLINS, Commander.
o
Y. M. C. A. NOTES,
The following boys passed the be
ginners' swimming test at the Y. M.
C. A., Tuesday, and are entitled to
wear the swimmer's buttons:
, J. R Myers, $olla Cavanaugh, Wm.
Y erkes, H. 3. Hill, Harry Current'
Lancaster, Sherrill 'Williams, Sim
Levy, Ben Stagall and Prentiss Bur
ton. The instruction class for girls will
begfn to-morrow afternoon at two
o'clock. Last year twelve girls Qual
ified as beginners ff during the free
instruction A period. All .tBourbon
county girls4 nine years oldt and .over
who cannot "swim are,'entitled to the
fr lesions. " . ..
$20,200 SUIT EESUIr OF AUTO
C0LLISI0N.
Suit Tor 20,200 damages as the
result of an alleged automobile col
lision, has been filed in the Fayette
Circui Court by Fannie Rankins
against Louise Van Meter and Drake
Thompson, Jr.
In "her petition the nlaintifp aW
l that on May 22 she was a passenger
m an automobile coming towards
Lexington on the Winchester pike.
When about three miles from 'the
city limits, it is stated, her machine
was run into by an automobile be
longing to defendant, Louise Van
meter, and driven by defendant.
i Drake Thompson. Jr.
renaerea unconscious for a while as
tne result of injuries. Damage to
the extent of ?20,000 are-asked for
personal injuries and $200 lor medi
cal expenses.
It is alleged here by witnesses
that the Ford machine which Fannie
Rankin and party, colored, occupied
ed at the time of the alleged acci
dent was standing in the middle of
the road, without light's and appar
ently unoccupied, as no one could be
seen. A cab driver who had pre
ceded the Paris party noticed the
Rankin machine and called to them
to get out of the middle of the road
and turn on their lights. His car
barely missed colliding with it. The
Paris party following did not see
the Rankin machine, and their ma
chine crashed into the back end in
the darkness. The occupants of the
son and Mrs. Van Meter were accom
panied by Jos. Letcher and Miss Anna
Wilson, of Paris.
. o ;
SUGAR SPECIAL 4
Sugar special for June 10th and
11th, 100 lbs-for ?7.20 delivered
free to your home.
PARIS BAKING CO.,
((It) I. L. Glass, Manager.
o
THANKS FOJl "CAMELS"
One of the busiest men in Paris,
one is who is always on the job in
the interest of his employers, is
Harry Drake, local buyer for and rep
resentative of the R. J. Reynolds
Tobacco Co., of North Carolina. Mr.
Drake is well-known to the people of
Paris and the countyfeas.av majajwhose.
middle name is "Hustler," and "who
never loses an opportunity to further
the interests of the big firan he rep
resents. Mr. Drake was a caller at THE
NEWS office yesterday, and present
ed the editorial ana mechanical
forces with generous contributions
of Camel Ci garettes, with the hopes
that all our troubles might "go up
in smoke." This grateful acknowl
edgment is hereby made to M.
Drake.
TVEAT, ESTATE TRANSACTIONS
: :
Harf? Current recently purchased
through Harris, Speakes & Harris,
realtors, a one-story frame cottage
located on South High 'street, be
longing to Ed. Speakes, for $2,500.
Mr. Current will be given possession
of the home in thirty days, when he
will move to and occupy it.
Several vacant lots located in the
old Bourbon College addition, be
longing to Harry L. Mitchell have
been sold through Mitchell & Son,
realtors, to the trustees of the color
ed Baptist church, for ? 3,0 00. The
lots abut' on Pinecrest Avenue, Syc
amore street and Short street. The
trustees will sell the church prop
erty on Eighth street and plan to use
the proceeds in erecting a church
building on the new location.
i mi i Q i
CITY SECURElNJUNCTItoT
Mayor E..B. January and City At
torney Denis Dundon, representing
the city of Paris, on Wednesday, se
cured the issuance of a temporary
injunction restraining the Paris Wa
ter company irom cuiuug un iuc
city water. Some time ago the Paris
Water ComDanv announced a raise in
rates for fire plugs for use of the
Paris Fire Department from ?$u to
$60. This rate the city refused to
,". "r .. . r "-:. Zmz.i.
i nov artn imip wmtht i;uuluh.iiv aix-
nouncea its intention oi cuiuus uu
the water. The matter will De
threshed out in the courts.
-J o
CAPT. F. E. NELSON ANNOUNCES
TOR MAJOR.
-
Capt. F. E. Nelson is a candidate
for Mayor of Paris, Ky. If elected
I will b$ on the job all the time, and
see that you get a run for your
money and less- taxes.
(It) CAPT. F. E. NELSON.
"LAUGH AND KEEP YOUNG"
"Laugh and Keep Young." Such is
i-h mrim of Pat Hanlon. 99-years-
young,' resident of Sacramento, Cali.j
Pat was torcea tcunaergu a wi
ous operation a few weeks ago. He
laughed when they placed him on
the operating table. And . the first
thing he did. when . he recovered
Iron? thef anaesthetic was laugh!
. pat smokes, chewand drinks, ana
declares tat tbeae three yices, com
crer lAftWfirti ff -erty
atW. ' -s. -- -I
STATE PRESS XEIICTS
BETTING RESOLUTlOJr
Tlle opposition effectually ifiswr
mc auu-race tracs: gaawllag
meat at the KentueW Ptmt ,
.B-HJ..B
anuu convention in Danville, Twsj
day. "Any attempt to inject into.tiV ""
proceedings of the Kentucky Prsssf
ouwauuir any master not pursM -within
the province of -this erg
ization of the editors of the Stat will
be firmly met," 'declared R.L, Mkim- -Lancaster,
president, of the K.P. A
"The discussion of racing or ra
track gambling does not come witfcia.
the province of this association,"1
said Ir. Elkin. "Political, moral or
purely civic issues are not genuf
to the purpose for which this asso
ciation was organized, nor may tfcsyf
be properly considered or actfci
upon under our constitution and by
laws. -
"I have heard a great deal to ts
effect that this matter or race track;
gambling is to be made the subject
of a resolution, but I will state fcer
and now that if , any memser doe
offer such resolution or "e4avoc
to inject it into discuseioms -ob. the
floor of the convention I will declare
such a resolution and the speaker
out of order."
' President Elkin pointed to the fast
that for several years .attemjts wer
made to hare the "association go o.
record as favoring prohibition, 'but
they were always, met in the same;
manner.
-K -
PROMINENT NEWSPAPER WG-.
,MAN HURT BY PALL
. .
Miss Annie M. Poage. one of the
most widely known newspaper wo
men in Kentucky while walking;
across the floor at the dormitory of
the Kentucky College for Women at
Danville, slipped and fell and suffer
ed a fracture of the hip. She waa
taken to her home- in' Ashlahd om
Monday afternoon. Miss Poage is
connected with the Ashlarid Inde
pendent, and was on the program for )
an address before the Kentucky
Press Association on "Observations
of a Woman in Journalism."
o
GOVERNOR PROCLAIMS "FLAG .
DAY" JUNE 14.
Flag Day will be observed June
14. Governor Edwin P. Morrow has
issued" a Flag Day proclamation call
ing on every son and daughter of
the flag on that day to pledge to it
anew their unfaltering, unswervingr
allegiance and love.
APPELLATE COURT ITEHS
In the Court of Appeals at Frank
fort, Tuesday, the following order
was. taken -in a case sent up from
the Bourbon Circuit Court:
Clay vs. Clay, Bourbon: Appellee
files motion and statement with.
notice to advance and set for oral
argument; motion submitted.
9
We Know How
The Latest Showing
OF
STRAW ITS
LIGHT-WEIGHT
Silk Socks
Ladies' Silk Hose
Wash Ties
Flannel Trousers
AUf the above are
quality goods of stan
dard makes.
If you. want the best
summer goods at the
,, right prices, see us.
See Window Display!
"We Know How"
MITCHELL &
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SILK SITS
UNDERWEAR
BLAKEMOfit
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