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Butler citizen. [volume] (Butler, Pa.) 1877-1922, October 15, 1879, Image 1

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SUBSCRIPT!©* BATES:
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in this paper must be accompanied by the real
name of the writer, not for publication, but as
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Marriage and death notices must be accompa
nied by a responsible name.
Address THE but J. er CITIZEN,
BUTLER. PA.
TRAVELERS' GUIDE.
BUTLER, KAIINS CITY AND PARKER RAILROAD
(Untler Time.)
Trains leave Butler for St. Joe, Milleratown,
Kirns City, Petrolia, Parker, etc., at 7.25 a. in.,
and 2.05 and 7.20 p. in. [Sec below for con
nections with A. V K. R.|
Trains arrive at Butler from the above named
points at 7.15 a. m.. and 1.55, and 0.55 p. ra.
The 1.55 train connects with train on the West
Penn road '.hrough to Pittsburgh.
Sunday trains arrive at 10 55 a. m. and 3.05
p. in., and leave at 11.10 a. m. and 4.10 p. m.
81IENANGO AND ALLEGHENY RAILROAD.
Trains leave Hilliard's Mill, Butler county,
for Harrisvillc, Greenville, etc., at 7.40 a. m.
and 12.20 and 2.20 p. ra. , „
Stages leave Petrolia at 5.30 a. ra. for 7.40
train,'and at 10.00 a. ni. for 12.20 train.
Return stages leave Milliard on arrival of
trains at 10,27 a, in. and 1.50 p. ra.
Stage leaves Martinsburg at 9.30 for 12.30
train.
P. N. C., & L. E. R. R.
The morning train loaves Zolionople at 6.11.
Harmony 6.16 and Evansbtirg at 6.3/, arriving
at Etna Station at 8.20. and Allegheny at 9.01.
The afternoon train leaves Zelieuop'e at 1.26,
Harmony 1.31, Evausburg 1.53. arriving at
Etna" Station at 4.11 and Allegheny at 4.4 G.
Trains connecting at Etna Station with this
road leave Allegheny at 7.11 a. m. and 3.51 p. m.
By getting oil at Bharpel>urg station and
crossing the bridge to the A. V. R. K., passen
gers on the morning train can reach the Union
depot at 9 o'clock.
PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD.
Trains leave Butler (Butler or Pittsburgh Time.)
Market at 5.11 a. in., goes through to Alle
gheny, arriving at 9.01 a. in. This train con
nects at Freeport with Frecport Accommoda
tion, which arrives at Allegheny at 8.20 a. m.,
railroad time.
Express at 7.21 a. m., connecting at Butler
Junction, without efiaugo of cars, at 8.2t) with
Express west, arriving In Allegheny at 9.5S
a. in., and Express east arriving at Blairsville
at 11.00 a. ra. railroad time.
Mail at 2.36 p. m., connecting at Butler Junc
tionwithout change of cars, with Express west,
arriving in Allegheny at 526 p. in., and Ex
press cast arriving at Blairsviile intersection
at 6.10 p. ra. railroad time, which conuects w.'th
Philadelphia Express east, when on time.
Sunday Express at 4.06 p. ru., goes through
to Allegheny, arriving at 6.06 p. ra.
The 7.21 a. m. train connects at Blairsville
at 11.05 a. m. with the Mail east, and the 2.36
p.m. (rain at 6.5'J with the Philadelphia Ex
press east.
Trains arrive at Bntler on West Penn it. R. at
9.51 a. m„ s.o<> and 7.11 p. m., Butler time. The
9,51 and 5.06 trains connect with trains on
the Butler & Parker R. R. Sun 'ay train arrives
at Butler at 11.11 a. m., connecting with train
for Parker.
Main Line.
Through trains leave Pittsburgh lor the Eat'
at 2.56 and 5.26 a. m. and 12 51, 4.21 and B.oft p.
in., arriving at Philadelphia at 3.40 and 7.20
p. ra. and 3.00, 7.00 and 7.40 a. ni.; at Baltimore
about the same time, at New York three hours
later, and at Washington about one and a half
hours later.
~~~* FINANCIAL.
A, n i (t*|nnnl^ nvci?te^mwa "st. stocks
SJ tO oIUUU ! makoa for , tnnes . evei 7
" | month. Book sent free ex
plaining everything. Address
BAXTER A CO., Bankers,
oct9 7 Wall street, N. Y.
Guaranteed Investments
By our Insurance System of Investments in
Ptcck Operations we" insure indemnity from
loss. No "Marginal"' or "Privilege" plans, in
vestments received in sums ol $25 and npward.
Correspondence from stock operators solicited.
Address, DAMIS MAYNARi* & CO.,
sept24-lm 58 Broadway, N. Y.
EDUCATIONAL
IN THIS age of Commerce and in these go-a-bead
times, the pressing demand is for thoroughly
trained men for business. Our Institution offers un
surpassed facilities to young and middle aged men
for obtaining a Practical Education. A short time
only is required lo complete the course of study.
Expenses light. Individual instruction. Students can
enter at any time. No vacations. For circula-s
address P. DI'FF A SO.VM, Pittsburgh.
Mtf Dun's Bookkeeping, published by Harper
A Bra*.; printed in colors; 400 pp. The largest wotk
on tho science published. A work for bankers,
railroads, business men and practical acceuutantji.
Price; 93.00, postage 20 cents.
Allegheny Collegiate Institute
FOR YOUNG LADIES.
ALLEGHENY CITY, 30 Stockton Ave.
Rev. THOS. C. STRONG, D. D.. President.
Will open on MONDAY, SEPTEMBER Btb.
School hours lroni 0 A. m. to 1.80 p. M. Its con
venient distance from the depots will permit
pupils living outside the city to leturn home
each day, thus saving expense for board.
For circulars address promptly as above.
aug27-2m
Exclusively devoted to the practical educa
tion of young and middle-aged men, for active
business life. School always in session. Stu
dents eau enter at any time. jlCf-Send for
circular.
J. C. SMITH, A. M., Principal,
sept24-3ra Pittshurgli, Pa.
DENTISTS.
DENTISTRY.
0 1# WALDRON, Graduate ol the Phll-
B adelphia Dental College,is prepared
• 11 •to do anything in the line of bis
profession iu a satisfactory manner.
Office on Main street, Eutler, Union Block,
lip stairs. apll
INSURANCE
BUTLER COUNTY
Mutual Fire Insurance Co.
Office Cor. Main and Cunningham Sts.
G. C. ROESSING, PRESIDENT.
WM. CAMPBELL, TREASURER.
H. C. IIEINEMAN, SECRETARY.
DIRECTORS:
J. L. Purvis, E. A. Helmholdt,
William Campbell, J. W. Bnrkhart,
A. Troutiuan, Jacob Schocne,
G. C. Roessing, John Caldwell,
Dr. W. lrvio, Samuel Marshall,
J. W.Christy H. C. Hciueraau.
JAS. T- M'JUNKIN, Gen, A^'T
BITTIJER :PA-
B ANKS.
THE BUTLER
SAVINGS BANK
BUTLEB, PA.
NEARLY OPPOSITE LOWRY HOUSE.
CAPITAL STOCY 60,000.
Wit. CAMTHF.I.I, JAS. D. ANDERSON,
President. Vice President.
Wm. CAMPBELL, Jr., Cashier.
DIHBCTOKB
William Campbell, J. W. Irwin,
.1 as. D. Anderson, Gooigo Weber,
Joseph L. Pnrviu.
DoeH a General Banking <fc Exchange business.
• Interest piid on time deposits. Collections made
and prompt returns at low rates of Exchango.
Gold. Exchange and Government Bonds bought
and sold. Commercial paper, bonds, judgment
and othersecuritioH bought at fair rates. la2Q:ly
' N * OK W /T)
VOL. XVI.
NEW
BOOT3SHOE STORE,
OION BLOCK,
IlSain Street, - - - - Sutler, Pa.
Has received his entire slock of
FALL AND WINTER <"
MOTS & SHOBS.
As I have an unusually large and attractive stock of BOOTS it SHOES
just opening, embracing all the newest styles, I invite the attention and
scrutiny of buyers.
Men's Kip and Calf Boots very cheap. Ladies', Misses' and Children's
Button, Polish and Side Lace Boots in endless variety, and at bottom pi ices.
Reynolds Brothers' celebrated fine Shoes always in stock.
Parties wanting BOOTS & SHOES made to order can do no better than
by me, as I keep none but ttie best of workmen in my employ.
I also keep a large stock of LEATHER and FINDINGS.
(pyAll goods warranted as represented. Alj. RUFfr «
BOBI ? T YOU BUY "FOUR
BOOTS & SHOES
Until You Have First Examined the Styles, Slock and Prices
T
B. C. HUSELTON'S
His entire Fall and Winter stock is just opening at very low figures. This
stock is unusually large in Men's, Boys' and Youth's Kip and Calf
Boots, Grain Napoleon Boots, Rubber Boots, Brogans and
Plow Shoes, Women's' Misses' and Children's
Calf and Kip (unlined) Shoes.
His Stock In Finer Lines is always large, embracing all the Latest Novelties in Boots
and Shoes- Old Ladies' Warm Shoes a Specialty.
A FULL ASSORTMEXT OF
LEATHER awl FINDINGS.
UgfTheso goods are all made by the very best manufacturers, and I
will guarantee them to give the best of satisfaction. Call and examine my
stock and prices.
B. O. rniSELTON.
West Point Boiler Works
3E2eta/toHsli.ecL 1835.
No. 13 Water Street, Pittsburgh, Pa.
FIRST PREMIUM STEAM
' STILLS, TANKS and SHEET XROH WORK
Of all descriptions to order on Shoit notice. Have on hand a large stock of
Hew and Good Second Hand Boilers !
REPAIRING DONE PROMPTLY.
Succ«»or lo WATSON & MUN ROE.
DA VIES & EVANS,
MERCHANT TAILORS,
»JC A.XHT WBL-a*®:IJVMKK.
HAVE JUST RECEIVED A CHOICE SELECTION OF
Domestic & Jmported Goods.
All our Goods are new and of the latest designs. We are both PRAC
TICAL TAILORS, keep thoroughly posted in all that pertains to the art,
and are thus enabled to guarantee to our patrons perfect satisfaction in neat
ness of fit, elegance of stylo and excellence of workmanship.
SCHOENECK & GLOSE,
Cor. 10th St. &. Penn Ave., PITTSBURGH, PA.,
Manufacturers and Dealers in all kinds of
FURNITUR E !
Are offering this Fall Extraordinary Inducements to Purchasers.
As tlicy manufacture every article in their line, tbry are enabled t<> sell at much lower prices
tbanaiy other house west of New York. Do not. liiil to call in before pnrch;Ving elsewhere,
and examine their large a 1.(1 well displayed assortment ol
Parlor, Chamber, Office and Dining Furniture.
Kitchen Furniture of every description always on hand. Also, Mattresses ol all kinds. Fur
niture made to order aud satisfaction graarantced in every particular. teplO-llm
ALL PARTIES
GOING WEST TO
lowa,
Missouri,
Kansas,
Nebraska,
Colorado or
California,
SHOULD GO VIA TIIE
Chicago, Burlington £ Quincy B. R.
ttzT'Tickets can bo had at ail offices whei o
Western tickets are sold. apltf-tf
Union Woolen Mi\i, |
BUTLER, PA.
11. FUliLl' UTO\, PropV. )
Manufacturer of Bi.vnkets, Fl.\nnei,s, Y ahns, !
Ac. Also custom work done to order, s'jch ns>
carding Roll*, making Blanket*, Knit- '
ting and Weaving Yarns, Ace., it vciy low ,
prices. Wool worked ou lUe iuaoes, il de- j
aired. m j7-iy I
Notice Extraordinary.
Persons denirinir to liavo their Did Furniture
repaired, or New Work made to order, sncli as
Music Stands. Book Cases. Wardrobes, Oitice
Desks, Office Tables, <fcc., would do well to call on
- _A_. 13. \VI!,S< >TV,
Practical Cabinet Maker.
I hold that a piece of furnitnro raa,!o by hand
in worth two made by machinery, and will cost
but littlo more, if any. Then why not have hand
made ? All work made in tho latest styles and
of the best materia!. I guarantee entire sat
isfaction in stvle, workmanship and price. Give
me a call. Shop 011 Mifilin street four doors
west of Main street, and opposite A. Trout man's
store, Butler, Pa. sop!7-ly
FOR SAI LE.
$5 will buy a one-hall interest in a good bus
iness in Pittsburgh. One who knows some
thing about fanning preferred. An honest man
with the above amount will do well 10 address
by letter, SMITH JOHNS, earc S. M. James,
93 Liberty street; Pittsburgh, |an27-ly
"Tflii Tills COLLAR
ami a Cow Milker free
f '. ti< Farmers who act at
[ Agents. Cut this out
PATENT FD. and [address with stamp
I r Name this paper.
BUTLER, PA., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1879.
FHYSICIANS.
JOHN E BYERS,
PHYSIC IAN .a xD S URG EON,
myai-ly] BUTLER, PA.
• LAND FOR SALK "
For Sale.
The well-improved farm of Eer. W. It. Hutch- j
isou.in (!;•■ northeast comer of Middlesex. town- !
ship, Butler comity, Pa . now offered for sale
low. Inquire of \V. K. FiiLSUEE, on tlio prom
ises. aplCtf j
125 Acres of Land for Sale.
A good Farm in Clinton tov.'iibhip, Butier Co.,
P»., containing about 12') acres, about 100 acres '
of which arc oloared and tho balance in good I
timber : good wat; r a:id \- ry good orchard ; can
be bad on very reasonable ti ran. Any person
desiring ench a farm can call upon or address
for tonne, the undersigned, living about 4'£
miles sonth of Saxoubarg and about six miles
oast of Bakerstown.
JOHN B. MONTGOMERY.
Biddies X Roads P. 0., Butler Co., Pa.
septlltf
For ©ale!
The undersigned, Assignee of A. K. Stoug'u
ton, offers for sale
15 Acres of !.an«l,
situated about three-fourths of amilo southwest
of Butler, on the plank road. The improve
ments arc a good frame dwelling honso, frame
stable. 3-'0 apple tree.;, peach, pear and plum
trees and other tumuli fruits. There is a good
spring and a wcdl oi. the premises. The land is
cleared and uud.-r cultivation, and will bo SOLD
AT A SACRIFICE.
For further information, inquiro of Thomas
Robinson, Butler, or tho undersigned, at Slip
pervioek. K. E. WICK,
seplltf Assignee of A. K. Stoughton.
JC.SHII.HUI! ACRES LAND
Situated in and near the
UPPER ARKANSAS VALLEY, IN SOUTH
WESTERN KANSAS,
—ON THE--
Atchison. Topeka & Santa Fe R, E.
II Years' Credit. " per cent. Interest.
Tie first payment at d ite of purchase is one
ten ill of the principal and r ven percent, iuter
eet on the remainder. At the end of the first
and second year, only the interest at seven per
cent, is paid; n:id the third year, and each year
thereafter, -one tenth oi the principal, with
seven per cent. Interest on the balance, is paid
annually until the whole is paid.
Six years' credit, liO per cent, discount.
Two years' credit, 30 per cent, discount.
Cash purchase, S3 !••') per cent, discount.
The valley ol'the Upper Arkansas* is justly
celebrated lor its adaptability to WHEAT
RAISING and the superior quality ol its grain.
As a STOCK-RAISING and WOOL-GROWING
country, it oflerr. advantages that cannot be ex
celled. Good soil, abundance of pure water, a
mild aud remarkably healthy climate, with low
prices and easy terms, make up a total of in
ducements greater than is offered anywhere else
on the continent ol' America.
For lull particulars, inquire of or address
C. A. SEYMOUR,
General Eastern Passenger Agent,
mv2l-lyl 41!) Broadway. N. Y:
109 Main St... Buffalo, N. Y.
THE WHO £
e sewing Machine
THE BEST OF
Unrivaled in Appearance,
Unparalleled in Simplicity,
Unsurpassed in Consiruction,
Unprecedented in Popularity,
And Undisputed in the Broad Claim
or CtINQ THE
VERY BEST OPERATEXO
QUICKEST 92W.1N0,
AI*»
Most Perfect Sewing Machine
THE WOftLP.
Tha great popularity of ths Wh!!e Is tha mos? Con
vincing tribute to its excellence and sunerio.-iiy
over other machines, an* in submitting it to tho
trade we put It upon its merits, and in no instance
has i t ever yet failed to satisfy any recommendation
In its favor.
The demand for the White has Increased tc such
an extent that we are now compelled to turn oul
Cosm.ple'to Se-wri=cr a.Ca.sln 20
avciy tliroo aaa-iii-u-tos isi
tii.es <3.a.y to G-o-pply
dam.ar.il
Ever* machine Is v.arranied (or 3 years, and
soldier csh at liberal discounts,or upon easy
1 payaienls, to suit the convenience ot customers.
W3TAGENTS WANTED JIT UNOCCUPIED SE2EISOS?.
WHITE SEWING~mCHINE CO.,
K2 3CQ Euclid Ave., Cleveland, Ohio.
VOX JOIItfrtOST. Agent.
Office at Vogeley's llakery,
gcptfl-fim EUTLEIi, PA.
NOW FOR 79 80!
Ths Examiner and Chronicle,
[E. j TMir.isiiKi> IN 1823,|
THE LEADiNG BAPTIST NEWSPAPER,
WIM. HE BELIVEKTSD 11Y MAIL, POST Ac, E PREPAID,
TO new snuscramiEs,
From Oct. 1* 1879, to Jan. 1» 1880,
For HO Cents,
TIIE ritlCE OF ONII VJAU'S KUJISCIUPTION BEING
Thiß is done to enable every family to see, at
at the least possible prico, what
the paper is.
No name obtained under this offer will be con
tinued bey.vd January 1. 189'*). un!c« prepaid
for 1880 at the regular subscription ,>riee.
THE EXAMINER COMPRISES
A CURRENT EVENT EXPOSITOR;
A LIVING PULPIT AND PLATFORM :
A SERIES OF AljLil "TOPICS FOR TIIE
TIMES";
A MISSIONARY AND BAPTIST EVENT
RECORD,
A SUNDAY SOFTOOL INSTITUTE ;
AN EDUCATIONAL ADVOCATE :
A LITERARY. THEOLOGICAL, SCIENTIFIC
AND ART REVIEW :
A POPULAR STORY PAOE. FAMILY MIS
CELL ANY AND PUZZLERS REALM;
A HOUSE. FAIiM AND GARDEN DEPART
MENT ;
A MARKET REPORTER, Ac., Ac., Ac.,
all conducted in an outspoken, wideawake and
popular manner.
THE EXAMINER AND CHRONICLE ia ono
of the largest-sized eight-page papers., and is
distinctively a Family Newspaper, with interest
ing and instructive reading for every number of
tiie household, from the olde.il to tlie youngest.
In making it tho editor h&a tho co-operation of
the bort newspaper, magazine and review
writers of tho day.
SAMPLE COPIES FREE.
Fur terms to Canvassers for lST'.i '3O address
I'. O. Box 3835, NEW Yokk Cm*.
»
PERILS OF
THE DARING WASH. DONALDSON'S LAST
VOYAGE HIS TRAITS OF CHARAC
TER—SOME INCIDENTS OF LO
CAL INTEREST.
[From the Pittsburgh Telegraph, Oct. 4.]
Apropos of the loss of the "Path
finder," and its unfortunate occupants,
the fate of Donaldson anil Griniweoil
conies to mind. Prof. Wash. A. Don
aldson was well aud favorably known
hereabouts, and his handsome compact
frame and fine features marked him as
a particularly attractive man. Prof.
Donaldson made one hundred and
thirty-nine successful ascensions, and
had many hairbreadth escapes. He
was originally a tightrope performer.
On May 3, 18(>2, he walked across the
Schuylkill river, at Philadelphia, on a
rope 1,200 feet long and 100 feet
high, ending by jumping from the rope
into the river, at a height of HO feet.
On September 20, ISC-4, he walked a
rope at Genesee Falls, Rochester, N.
Y., that was 1,800 feet long and 200
feet high. His balloon ascensions
were marked by the most daring
trapeze performances. He swung from
a bar by one foot at a height of 5,000
feet, skinned the cat, and turned somer
saults. His sixth ascension was at
Norfolk, Virginia, on January IS, 1572.
The balloon burst when four hundred
feet high, but did not collapse. It
closed in at the sides, and the rush of
air turned it into a parachute. It fell
in a burr chestnut tree. Donaldson
lost his grasp, and was precipitated
through the limbs 'of the tree. His
tights were torn off, and his legs, arms
and body were badly lacerated. The
tree saved his life.
Donaldson's next trip was from
Norfolk. He struck a wind that car
ried him oceanward ten miles in seven
minutes. Once ou the ocean death
was certain. lie pulled the valve
rope, but the gas escaped too slow.
He climbed the rigging, the balloon
careening on its side, and sljt the can
vass. He struck the ground in a largo
cornfield, and was dragged nearly
1,000 feet. The wind blew a gale.
Crashing against a rail fence, ho was
rendered insensible. A tree on the
ocean beach caught his balloon and
ripped it to shreds, but saved his life.
On his ninety-eighth ascension Mr.
Donaldson took up a wedding party.
It was the first wedding in midair.
The following is a copy of the mar
riage certificate:
: CHARI.ES M. COLTON, ) MARRIED :
: Miss MARY E. WALSH, J :
In Balloon "P. T. Bar:mm," :
: One mile high over Cincinnati, Ohio, •
: October 19, 1874.
I REV. H. B. JEFFRIES,
| Officiating Clergyman. :
Jeffries was a Swedenborgian, an
odd chap who acted as reporter for the
Leader, this city, but subsequently
went out West to keep a hotel.
During Barnum's exhibitions here in
187 i Mr. Donaldson made many as
censions, including one with a basket
load of schoolmarms, including Miss
Mulhatton, recently elected to a posi
tion at the High School. A number
of newspaper men took trips with the
bold aeronaut, who won all to him by
his manly, cool and gentlemanly bear
ing. Donaldson's last ascension was
his one hundred and thirty-ninth, and
was made at Chicago, July 15, 1875.
The balloon was the P. T. Barnum.
She carried 83,000 cubic feet of gas
and 800 pounds of saud. Mr. Grim
wood of the Journal and Maitland of
the Po?t were to go with Mr. Donald
son. • Maitland was at one time em
ployed upon a Pittshurgli paper.
Mr. E. E. Wood, a brother reporter,
approached Mr. Grimwood a few mo
ments before he entered the basket.
"1 only care to go this once, just for
the experience," said Mr. Grimwood.
"The wind's unfavorable, but per
i haps an upper current will make that
all right," Mr. Wood remarked.
Grimwood laughed. "It won't
work," he said, with a shake of the
head. "They're trying to frighten the
reporters by saying that Donaldson
expects to be carried into Michigan,
with the chances of being gone two or
three days. It won't work."
"Well," replied Mr. Wood, "what's
the difference? If you should fly
over to Michigan the trip would be all
the more interesting, and you'd have
a chance to spread in the Journal."
"That's so," said Grimwood.
"Come to think of it, I'd like to land
in Michigan. But if I'm going so far
from home I ought to have more
money."
He borrowed a ten dollar bill from
a Mr. Adams, another reporter, saying;
"I guess that'll do."
Mr. Wood then iravc Grimwood a
field glass to aid his observations
while in mid-air. A life preserver
was thrown into the car. Grimwood
said: "If I should see that we're
settling into the lake, I'll pull oft' my
boots and slap on the life preserver.
I'm a good swimmer, and can stand a
good deal."
The two reporters stepped into the
basket. Donaldson followed. The
balloon was overburdened, and he said
that only one reporter could accom
pany him. He called for a volunteer
to remain behind. Neither reporter
moved. Maitland pulled a copper
from his pocket and Hipped it in the
air, and Grimwood shouted "head."
Maitland won, and Grimwood was re
luctantly crawling frem the car when
Mr. Donaldson's agent interfered.
"Gentlemen," said he, "the lots must
be cast in tho usual way, under my
direction." He wrote "lirst choice"
and "second choice" on slips of paper,
and shook them in a police officer's
hat. The hat was held aloft, and the
officer drew the decisive slip. It was
Grim wood's death warrant. He step
ped back into the basket with Donald
son, and Maitland despondently with
drew.
The doomed balloon sped out of
sight. A terrific storm swept over
the lake (Michigan) and the balloon
j was seen no more. On the Kith of
! August the body of Grimwood was
; found on the east shore of Lake Michi
gan, near Stone Creek. The body
j was fully identified. It was coin
j pletely clothed, except that the hat
1 and boots were missing and around
the body was a broken life preserver.
His watch, papers, letters, fruit knife,
a certificate of membership in the Chi
cago Public Library, and the field glass
that was so kindly furnished by Mr.
Wood, were also futind upon his body.
Also the following notes, written when
over the Lake Michigan ;
I'roni the earliest days of childhood I have
always had a presentment that some time,
sooner or later, ! v. is I> >mnl to rise.
There are some people who make .sport of
pros •ntments, but, ali- r all, a presentment is a
handy thing to have around.
Wlii re would I have been to-day if I hadn't
had a presentment.
IN acconi ::iee with my presentment I have
r;s!'n, as it were, to a "point of order."
Like a groat many politicians, I rise by
means of gas.
I rcyret the fact that there are only two of
as—Prof. Donaldson and myself- -as 1 would
like to be among the "upper ten."
l'rof. Donaldson seems i.i be a very pleasant
gentleman although a philosopher and aero
naut.
Although it is scaiv 'lv an hour since I strug
g'ed into eminence, the restraints of my {w.si
ii >n are already beginning to be irksome to me,
and to wear upon my spirits.
I cannot help reflecting that if we fall, we
fall, like Lucifer, out of the heavens, and that
our arrival upon earth, or rather upon water—
lor we are over the middle of Lake Michigan
—we would be literally DEAD.
Nothing has been heard of Donald
son, nor have any remains of the bal
loon been discovered. The finding of
Grimwood's body, however, estab
lished the fact that they lost their lives
in the lake.
YORK TO WN CENTENARY.
The surrender of Cornwallis at
Yorktown practically ended the war
for American independence, and as
there was no event in that war which
had a greater influence upon the des
tinies of this people, so there was
none more dramatic in its nature, or
more significant of the methods by
which A iuerican independence was
won. Curiously enough the campaign
which ended at Yorktown illustrated
every phase of the conflict, and its his
tory is a sort of epitome of the story
of the Revolution.
The British under Prevost gained a
foothold at Savannah,as they did every
where during the Revolution, by regu
lar methods, overcoming the irregular
American opposition without difficulty.
When they advanced northward, how
ever, the irregular opposition under
Lincoln gave them greater trouble at
Pocotaligo, and on John's and James'
Islands, and for a time they were
baffled at Charleston. When Clinton
substituted siege for desultory warfare,
as he could, the American opposition
was again ineffective, as it always was
in such circumstances, and Charleston
and Georgetown fell into the enemy's
hands.
The advance of the British inland
next encountered American opposition
of moment at Camden. There Gates
made the great mistake of the Revo
lution. Arrogantly neglecting the les
son which every event of the war had
taught, he led his army of volunteers
as if it had been an army of regular
troops, giving the British regular bat
tle in which they were always superior
to the Americans. He was beaten
utterly, and his army was broken and
dispersed.
Then came Nathaniel Greene, of
Rhode Island—after Washington the
ablest and wisest commander in the
patriot army—charged with the task
of opposing the victorious British,
without an army, without money, pro
visions, officers or men. Gathering
together the farmers and such troops
as were within reach, Greene directed
his march so as to encourage the people
and draw volunteers to his standard,
while recruiting the health of his men
and collecting supplies. Greene was a
grand master of the tactics which won
American liberty. He understood the
conditions of the conflict aud adapted
his measures to them. His mind was
too large for conventionalism, lie
knew that in pitched battles the Eng
lish must always have an advantage,
and that a campaign of pitched battles
must result disastrously to the Ameri
can cause. He fought something like
regular battles, it is true, but he chose
his own time and places for doing so,
and fought with the understanding
that he would probably lie beaten,
making his arrangements for wresting
advantage from defeat. Deliberately
he set out to win a campaign while
losing the battles of which it consisted.
He fought and retired, and fought
again, so manceuvcring as to keep the
enemy constantly upon a strain and
constantly baffled. He nowhere risked
the campaign upon a battle, but took
caic to retire from a lost action with
strength for marching and fighting
| again'. In this way, while lie could
not defeat the British, he made it im
possible for them to crush him. Mean
while ho was detaining them in the
wilderness of the Carolinas, entang
ling them in a net from which escape
grew constantly more and more diffi
cult, wearing them out with marches
and countermarches, while his parti
sans, under Marion and Sumter, were
picking to pieces the British line of
communication and worrying the spirit
out of the British army by constant
harassing.
Finally Cornwallis, despairing of an
opportunity to crush Greene, resumed
his march northward, only to fall into
the trap which had been prepared for
him during the time that Greene had
gained by detaining him, and Greene
was left free to reconquer the Caro
linas.
How Cornwallis marched northward,
and was entrapped between the Ameri
can army and French fleet, for the ap
proach of which Greene had secured
time, is a story known to every school
boy, and there is certainly no story in
our history worthier to be remembered.
There is reason to be glad, therefore,
that the arrangements are making for
the proper celebration of the centennial
anniversary of the Yorktown surren
der, which will occur on the 19th day
of October, 1881. The scheme con
templates a gathering of army and
naval representatives, civil and mili
tary delegates from all the States in
the Union, a great gathering of the
people, and a fitting representation of
the French navy, which played so im
portant a part in the historical event
to be celebrated. Distinguished French
naval officers, it is undersood, have
expressed their purpose to participate
in the celebration, aud it is confidently
IHieved that a French squadron will
bo sent hither for the purpose.
The sehenie is well conceived, and
and its objects will, without doubt,
command the earnest sympathies of
all patriotic people. The invitation of
the thirteen Governors, when it shall
be sent out, will meet with the heart
iest reception everywhere. The cele
bration will commemorate at once the
principal event of the Revolution, ami
the genius and courage and great
hearted patience which made the Revo
lution successful.
THE VINEYARD STATE.
The first vines planted by the hand
of men in the Golden States were set
out by the Spanish priests in 1771,
at the Mission San Gabricllo. Soon
following, every Jesuit post in Califor
nia was supplied with vines from
Spain, and the "monks of old" quaffed
the* sweet wine therefrom and enjoyed
the clusters of flaming Tokay many
years before the province passed into
our hands. One of these old vines is
still living at a ruined monastery in
Southern California, where its roots
feed in the warm moist soil of a tepid
spring. It is trained upon a frame
work of trellis and its laterals actually
cover more than an acre of ground.
It is not as thrifty now as it has been
in younger days, when the records
show that as much as two tons of fruit
have been gathered in a single season
from the wrinkled arms of this grand
old Nestor of the Pacific vineyards.
In 185G a careful count of the plant
ing in California disclosed the fact that
then there were 1,500,000 vines grow
ing under cultivation in the State, and
to-day the best authority—the Presi
dent of the Yinicultural Society of
California—estimates from the data in
his hands that there are forty to forty
five millions of bearing vines in that
Commonwealth. This indicates very
plainly the enormous planting of about
three thousand acres of vineyard every
year since 1856. This extraordinary
rate of increase sets the mind to cal
culation, and in mild astonishment
the result of surh progress for the
coming fifty years will enable the vine
growers of California to produce an
nually one hundred million gallons of
pure grape wine. In California to
day there are 60,000 acres in vine
yards, and the capital employed in the
culture of grapes and the making of
wine is $30,000,000. The annual pro
duct amounts to $2,300,000, not tak
ing into account the surplus stock. It
is also significant that California in
1878 produced, exported, and con
sumed herself twice as much wine as
the whole United States imported
from France. The California wines
are not adulterated; indeed, grapes
are so sweet an 1 so cheap that it
would not pay to do so. They are
made from the juice of the grape alone,
without the addition of water, sugar,
alcohol, coloring matter, or flavoring
essences of any kind. They are often
sold, however, under disguise, with
the spurious labels of French and Ger
man wines affixed. The machinery
and apparatus 'generally employed in
California are vastly superior to that
used in other countries, and it tends
to greatly cheapen the cost of manu
facture.
Too MUCH SLEEP —The effects of
too much sleep, says the Golden Rule,
are not less signal than those arising
from privation. The whole nervous
system becomes blunted, so that the
muscular energy is enfeebled, and the
sensations, the moral and intellectual
manifestations are obtunded. All the
bad ell'eets of inaction become devel
oped ; the functions are exerted with
less energy; the digestion is torpid,
the exertions are diminished, whilst
in some the secretions of fat
accumulate to an inordinate extent.
The memory is impaired, the powers
of imagination are dormant, and the
mind falls into a kind of habitude,
chiefly because the functions of the
intellect are not sufficiently exerted,
when sleep is too prolonged or too
often repeated. To sleep much is not
necessary to be a good sleeper. Gen
erally they are the poorest sleepers
who remain longest in bed; that is
they awaken less refreshed than if the
time of arising were earlier by an hour
or two. While it is true that children
and young people require more sleep
than, their elders, yet it should be the
care of parents that over-indulgence
be not permitted. Where the habit is
for children to lie in bed until eight or
nine in tho morning, tho last two
hours, at least, do not bring sound
dreamless sleep, where the hour for
retiring is 8 or i) P. M., but are spent
in "dozing," and, in fact, such excess
cannot fail to insure harmful results
described bv tho authority quoted.
What is called "laziness" among chil
dren is, in very many cases, disease,
and is largely "due to this, as well as
tho other causes mentioned that under
mine the foundation of health.
CARRIED HIS OWN PEA. —The fol
lowing 1 story is told in the Gentleman's
Magazine: "A friend of mine, travel
ing afoot with a companion through
the green lanes of the midland counties,
came unexpectedly upon a country
racecourse, and found in one portion
of the ground a thimblerig establish
ment in full work. In spite of re
monstrances his companion, a thorough
madcap, whom I will call A, insisted on
observing the game. Would the gent
like to bet a crown he could find the
little pea ? said the expert. Agreed,
was the answer. The money on both
sides was deposited, and A, lifting up
the thimble, pointed out the required
pea and took the stakes. A second
l>ct, 'double or quits,' ended, to the
obvious surprise of the offioiator at the
board, in the same result. A third
Wet, 'a pound or nothing,' steadied the
nerves of the loser, and the trick was
accomplished with much circumspec
tion. Again A lifted up a thimble
and showed the pea, taking at the
same time the stake. 'S' help me,'
etc., said the bewildered artist, '1
didn't put it there.' 'No,' said the
winner, retreating with the spoil of
war; '1 always carry my own pea.'
i am not answerable for the morality
of this story."
ADYKKTISINU 11AT1JH,
Ono square, ono insertion, *1 ; each subse
quent insertion, 50 cetilti. Yearly advertisements
cxoiiiiiug otic-fourth of a column, }u |XT inch.
Figure worn double tliero tales; additional
charges where weekly or monthly changes are
made. I .oral advertisements 10 cents (>er lino
for ti»t insertion, and 5 cents |>cr line for eacli
additional insertion. Mairiages and deaths pub
lished free of charge. OUtnarv notice* charged
as advertisements, and payable when handed in
Auditors' Notices, $4; Executors' and Adminis
t raters' Notices. ?3 each; Est ray. Caution and
Dissolution Notices, not exceeding ten lines, ?2
each.
Trom tho fact that the CITIZEN is the oldest
established and most extensively circulated Re
publican newspaper in Under county, (a Repub
lican county; it must lie apparent' to business
men that it is the medium they should use in /
advertising their business.
NO. 4<>.
"WHAT O'CLOCK IS ITV'
When I was a young lad my father
one day called me to him that he
might teach me to know what o'clock
it was. lie told me the use of the
minute finger and the hour hand, and
describe to me the figures on the dial
plate, until I was j>erfect in my part.
No sooner was I quite master of this
knowledge than I set oil" scampering
to join my companions in a game of
marbles, but by father called me back
again. "Stop, Willie," said he, "I
have something more to tell you."
Rack again 1 went, wondering what
else I had got to learn ; for 1 thought
1 knew all about the clock as well as
my father did. "Willie," said he, "I
have taught you to know the time of
day. I must now teach you the time of
your life."
I waited rather impatiently to hear
how my father would explain this
further lesson, for I wished to go to
my marbles. "The Rible," .said he,
describes the years of a man to be
threescore and ten or fourscore years.
Now life is indeed very uncertain, and
you may not live a single day longer ;
but if we divide the forescore years of
an old man's life into twelve parts, like
the dial of a clock, it will give almost
seven years for every figure.
"When a boy is seven years old,
then it is one o'clock of his life; and
this is the case with you. When you
reach fourteen years old, it will be
two o'clock with you; and when at
twenty-one, it will be three o'clock; at
twenty-eight, it will be four o'clock;
at thirty-five, it will be five o'clock;
at forty-two, it will be six o'clock ; at
forty-nine, it will be seven o'clock,
should it please God to-spare your life.
In this manner you may always know
the time of your life, and looking at
the clock may remind you of it. My
great-grandfather, according to this cal
culation, died at twelve o'clock, my
father at ten. At what hour you or I
shall die, Willie, is only known to
Him who knoweth all things." Sel
dom since then have I heard the in
quiry, "What o'clock is it?" or looked
at the face of a clock, without being
reminded of the words of my father.
■»»-.«>■ ■>
A YOUNG MAN WHO WANTED TO
JOIN THE CIRCUS. —The Virginia (Ne
vada) Chronicle says : Last evening,
after the performance was over at the
circus, a young man called on Chiarini
and said he wauted to see him on pri
vate business. The old veteran took
liim into the private office and received
him with his usual politeness.
"I came up ali the way from Carson
to see the show, and I'd like to join,"
said the young man.
"Oh, I see," said the circus man.
"You arc a well-formed, healthy-look
ing young fellow, and I like to encour
age such as you."
The youth's face brightened.
"You don't chew, smoke or drink, I
hope?"
"Oh! no; honor bright—except
soda and beer."
"You must leave off these bad habits.
They weaken the muscles and paralyze
the nerves. You can soon stop drink
ing, but your salary will not be large
until you have overcome these ten
dencies. A little lemonade—circus
lemonade—is all that the performers
drink. Call at eleven oclock to-morrow
morning and I will see what I can do.
You musn't expect over SSO a week,
though at first. We never pay high
salaries until we know just what a
man can do."
The delighted Carsonite went away,
and next morning was on hand.
Chiarini took him to a tent where
three immense Bengal tigers were
caged. Handing him a currycomb and
a pair of shears he remarked:
"Your duties will be comparatively
light at first. You will go into the
cage and curry the tigers down every
morning, and about once a week cut
their claws; keep 'em down pretty
short, so that when they attack tho
tiger-tamer, Mr. Wilson, they won't
lacerate him much. Sometimes, but
not more than once a month, you may
have occasion to file their teeth. You
just throw the animal on his back and
hold his head between your knees. If
lie acts rough belt him on the nose a
few times. Keep belting him until he
quiets down."
"Haven't you got a vacancy in tho
art department*?" asked 'the young
man from Carson.
"Is art in your line?" inquired
Chiarini.
"Yes," drawled the young man.
"In the circuses I've always run with
I was employed to paint the stripes on
the zebras. I killed so many tigers
keepin' 'em straight that the boss
wouldn't let me handle them. He said
I used 'em too jlamned rough."
Chiarini swears that the terror from
Carson shall have the first vacancy.
CLAWED BY A CENTIPEDE. —SeveraI
Mexicans were in camp at the mouth
of Memphis creek, U. T., and wero
lying about the fire when one of them,
Telestro Cruca, saw a large centipede,
fully nine inches long, travelling
slowly over his leg. Knowing that
the least motion would make it sink
its deadly claws into his skin, without
moving his leg he got out his revolver
and waited until the insect had almost
reached his knee, when, slowly put
ting the mouth of the pistol to its head,
he pulled the trigger, and the centipede
was gone. Rut a centipede's claws
are quicker than gunpowder, and
Cruca began to cramp in a few min
utes, the track of the insect along his
leg turned a brownish yellow and the
place where it was killed swelled up
frightfully. Cruca rapidly grew worse,
1 and in a little over four hours after
ward he died in great agony. But
the most singular part of the story is
that the bullet from Cruca's pistol cut
a small nick in the fore leg of a mule
that was tethered near by, and at day
light the next morning the mule was
also dead, with the leg so swollen that
the skin had burst in several places. •
"I WISH I were you about two
hours," she said to her husband, with
great tenderness. "And why, my
I dear,?" he asked. "Because," she said,
toying affectionately with her watch
chain, "because then I would buy my
wife a new bonnet."

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