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Butler citizen. [volume] (Butler, Pa.) 1877-1922, November 12, 1879, Image 1

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(tUBStKIPTIOIV BATES :
Per year, in a/lvance
Othemri.se 2
No subscription will !« discontinued nntil all
arrearages are paid.
notifv us when rubscntera do not take out tiiair
tapers will be held liable for the «abecnptioo-
Mbtcribelt removing from one po«toffice to
ai.otl should jfivo us t!ie name of the former
in -Brell ad the present office.
All communications intended for publication
in thin paper must be accompanied by the real
name of tho writer, cot for publication, but M
a guarantee of good faith.
Marriage and death notices must be accompa
nied by a responsible name.
Address THK BOTI . BR CITIXKH,
EUTLEB. PA.
TRAVELERS' GUIDE.
BI'TLKH, EARNS CITT AND PARKER RAILROAD
(Untier Time.)
Trains leave Butler for St. Joe, Millerstown,
Karns City, Petrolta, Parker, etc., at 7.25 a. m.,
and 2.05 and 7.20 p. m. [See below lor con
nection" willi A. V R K.|
Trains arrive at Butler from the above named
points at 7. sa. m.. r.nd t.55, and 6.- r >s r iu.
The 1.55 train connects with train on the West
Pcnn rou! '.[.roach to Pittsburgh.
SHRNA.SOO AND ALI.EOHESV RA!J.KOAI>.
Trains leave Billiard'* Ml*.l, Bulltr county,
for Hnrrlsvllle, Greenville, etc., at 7.40 a. m.
and 12.20 and 2.2'J p. ra. 4
Blazes lea' e Pelrolia at 5.30 a. m. for 7.40
train, and at 10.00 a. m. tor 12 'io train.
Return <=ta?:'-s leave Hillinrd on arrival of
trains at 10.27 a. iu. and 1.50 p. ui.
State leaves Martiasburg at 0.«0 for 12.0u
train.
r. n. c.. * l. e. r. a.
Tho morning train leaves Zclier.cple at Gil,
Harmouv G.lfi and at 6.32, arriving
at Etna Station at 3.20. and Allegheny at 9 01.
Tho afternoon train leaves Zelienop'e rt 1.*5.
Harmony 1.31. Evacsburg 1.C3 arriving st
Etna fetation at 411 an<l Allegheny at 4.40.
Trains connecting at Etna Station with this
road leave Allegheny at 7.11 a. m. and 3.51 p. ra.
i. Bv gttting .'A at Siiarpsl'U'iT nation ana
the bridge to the A. V. R. R., |*.nsseu
gers on the morning train can reach the Union
depot at 9 o'clock.
TBSN3TLVANIA RAILROAD.
Train" leave Bntler (Buller or Pittsburgh Time.)
Market H 5.11 a. m., gws U.rough to Alle
gheny, arriving at 9.01 o. ra. This train con
rects at Free port with Frceport Accommoda
tion, which arrives at Allegheny at 8.20 a. in.,
railroad time.
Express at 7.21 a. m., connecting at Butler
Junction, without change of cars, it 8.20 wi:h
Express wwt, arriving In Allegheny at 9.51
a. ro , and Express east arriving at B1 iirsvillc
at 11 00 a. m. railroad time.
Mail at 2.K0 p. in., connecting at Butler Junc
tion without change ot cars, with Express west,
arriving in Allegheny at 5 2t» p. in., and Ex
press east arriving at Blalrsville Intersection
at 6.10 p. m. milroad time, which connects wHh
Philadelphia Kxpress cast, when on time.
Sun <lr.y Express at 4.00 p. ro., goes through
to Allegheny, arriving at 6.06 p. m.
The 7.21 a. m. train connects at Blalrsville
at 11.05 a. m. with the Miil east, and the 2.:J0
p. us. train at 6.59 with the Philadelphia Ex
press east.
Trains arrive at Butler on West Penn K. R at
9.51 a. ra., 5 (*> and 7.11 p. m., Butler lime. The
9,51 ard 5.06 trains connect with trains on
the Buller & Parker R. R. Sun 'ay train arrives
at Butler at 11.11 a. m., connecting with train
for Parker.
Main Line.
Through trains leave Pittsburgh lor the E <? #
ot 2.56 and 8.26 a. m. and 12 51, 4.21 ar.d 8.06 p.
m., arriving at Philadelphia at 3.40 and 7.20
i». m end-3.00, 7.0 ■ and 7.40 a. re.; at Baltimore
about the same t : me, at New York three hcurs
later, ftr.d at Washington about one and a half
boars later.
FINANCIAL.
<Mn (Mnnni Investjd ,n WiU at - Btockß
*!U tO S)IUI)UJ»S fr~ Su
staining everything. Address
BAXTER A CO., Bankers.
CcfO 7 Wall street, S. T.
EDUCATIONAL.
North Washington Academy.
Winder session opens Dec 1, 1870.
In this Academy are taught all -be common,
as well as all tile higher English brashes,
higher Mathematics an 1 the classic*, including
Latin, Oreelt and French. The whole expense
of any pupil per term at this Academy need not
exceed from 515 t;> 523.
TUITION:
Primary |4 00
Intermediate 0 01
ClasricM 8 00
Instrumental Music 7 00
For the benefit of those wish'ng to attend
school shodo not. wish to buy new text books,
we will furnish all text books needed by each
pupil at the low rent of f 1 per session.
Boarding from *2 to *3 )>cr week. Rooms
for self boarding from 50c, to 75c. per month
pe pupil.
INSTRUCTORS:
B. P. CuAWFonn, Principal and Instructor in
Theory of Teaching and Greek.
MRS. H. L. DICKSON, Instructor in Higher
Engiirh and French.
Miss Ai.WII.DA HARPER, Instructor in Instru
mental Music.
For further information address tho Principal
at North Hope, Butler county, Pa. octs-3t
WK«T NUXBUHY
Normal Academy.
The V,'inter Term will open Dec. 2,1879, and
continue thirteen weeks.
Dr. Eaton, of Franklin, Pa, will lecture be
fore the students on the evening of Dec. 2nd.
TLe design ol ! his Academy is to prepare
teachers for doing good work in lh" school
room, to lit studunti for entering college, and
to nfl'ird to all a g ioJ business education.
Students can commence the study of the
Languages each term.
TUITION PER TERM:
Primary, including all the studies author
ized by law to be taught in the common
schools, ---------- - (5 00
JnlcrmHinte, 6 50
Higher English Classics, - -- -- -800
Rooms Jor ielf-boarders from 50 cuts to $1
per month. Board from $1.75 to ti per week.
No pains will lie spared in making the school
pleasant and profitable to all.
For additional information address
J. B. UILFILLAN, Principal.
0291t] Coultersviile P. 0., Butler Co., Pa.
Exclusively devoted to the practical educa
tion of young and middle-aged men, for active
business life. School always in session. Stu
dent! can enter at any time. for
circular.
J. C. SMITH, A. M., Principal,
sept24-3m Pittsburgh, Pa.
DENTISTS.
" DE^TISTRYT
0 1/ WALDRON. Or? dnate ot the Phil
■ a.ltlphla Dental College,ls prepared
■ It ato do anjtiling in the line of his
profession In a satisfactory manner.
Office on Main street, Butler, Union Block,
up stairs. npll
' BANKS.
XHEBUTLER
SAVINGS BANK
HUTL.E It. PA.
NEARLY OPPOSITE LOWBY HOUSE.
CAPITAL STOCK 60,000.
Wm. CAMmirr i.. JAS. D. Axnitnsos.
President. \ ice President.
W*. CAMPBELL, Jr., Cashier.
DIRECTORS
William Campbell, J. W. Irwin,
Jae. D. Anderson, Oeorge Weber,
Joseph L. Purvis.
Does a General Banking h Exchange business.
Interost pj.id on time deposits. Collections made
and prompt returns at low rates of Exchange.
Gold Exchange and Government Bonds bought
and sold. Commercial paper, bonds, judgment
and oilier securities bought at fair ratcH. (a2o:ly
IVotice.
TKE.VBCEY DFRARTMKNT, 1
Ofjicr of Comptroller of the Currency, J
WABHINGTOS, Aug. 5, 1870.
Notice is hereby given to all pcroons who
may have claims against the First National
Bank of Butler, that the same must he pre
sented to Henry B. Cullum, Receiver, at Butler,
Pa., with the legal proof thereof, within three
mouths from this date, or they will be dis
allowed. J. 8. LANGWOKTHY,
Acting Comptroller of the Currency
•Ogl3-3mj
VOL. XV I.
I NEW
BOOT • SHOE STORE,
T >I < » BLOCK,
Main Street, - - - - Butler, Pa.
FALL AND WINTER W
BOOTS & SHOES.
As I have an unusually large and attractive stock of BOOTS & SHOES
just opening, embracing all the newest styles, I invite"the attention and close
scrutiny of buyers.
Men's Kip and Calf Boots very cheap. Ladies', Misses' and Children's
Button, Polish and Side Lace Boots in endless variety, and at bottom prices.
Bevnolds Brothers' celebrated fine Shoes always in stock.
Parties wanting BOOTS & SHOES made to order can do no better than
by me, as I keep none but the best of workmen in my employ.
I also keep a large stock of LEATHER and FINDINGS.
5^" All goods warranted as represented. AI». RUFF.
DOM'T YOU BUY YOUR
BOOTS & SHOES
Until You Have First Examined the Styles, Stock and Prices
-A- T
B. C. HUSELTON'S.
His entire Fall and Winter stock is just opening at very low figures. This
stock is unusually large in Men's, Boys' and Youth's Kip and Calf
Boots, Grain Napoleon Boots, Rubber Boots, Brogans and
Plow Shoes, Women's' Misses' and Children's
Calf and Kip (unlined) Shoes.
His Stock In Finer Lines is always large, embracing all the Latest Novelties in Boots
and Shoes Old Ladies' Warm Shoes a Specialty.
A FULL ASSORTMENT OP
LEATHER and FINDINGS.
Jjgr*These goods are all made by the very best manufacturers, and I
will guarantee them to give the best of satisfaction. Call and examine my
stock and prices.
B. C. HUSELTON.
Wess Point Hoiler Works
Eot&telisfc.eca. 1535.
No. 13 Water Street, Pittsburgh, Pa,
FIRST PREMIUM STEAM
STILLS, TANKS and SHEET IRQ* WOHK
Of all description* to orJcr on Shoit notice. Have on hand a largs vtoc'< of
£Tew and Cood Second Hand Boilers I
REPAIRING DONE PROMPTLY.
171 L. Successor <o WATSON A MUNROE.
DAVIES & EVAN'S,
MERCHANT TAILORS,
HAVE JUST RECEIVED A CHOICE SELECTION OF
Domestic & Imported Goods.
All our Goods are new and of the latest designs. We are both PRAC
TICAL TAILORS, keep thoroughly posted in all that pertains to the art,
and are thus enabled to guarantee to our patrons perfect satisfaction in neat
ness of fit, elegance of style and excellence of workmanship.
SCHOENECK & GLOSE,
Cor. 10th St. L Penn Ave., PITTSBUF.GH, PA.,
Mnnufacturers and Dealers in nil '.duds of
FURNITURE !
Are offering this Fall Extraordinary Inducements to Purchasers.
A* IIIPJ moDnfnrlure every article in ibeir line, tliey arc enabled to oell nt much lower price?
tban ni y other house wratol New York. Do not lull to call in bclore pnrebfeing elsewhere,
and examine their large ut.d well displayed a«Bortnjcia ol
Parlor, Chamber, Office and. Dining Furniture.
Kitchen Furniture ol every description aiwayn on baud. Aluo, Mattresses ol all kinds. Fur
niture trade to order and siitlfcfactkn uuaranteed in every particular. *eplo-3tu
WIS. 32 A3II>OHF,
DKAI.EIt IN
lltdcM, feather, FlndingM, T:il-
I u, Slic»«»p I'ollh, I'luHier
Hair, Ac., Ac.
iltszlicst prices paid In cash lor Hid js, Kip?,
ftalfokins, Sheep pelts. Tallow, Ac.
All kinds or Leather, and a!ro "latter Hair,
always on hand, and sold at tLi(j lowest cash
prices. Also, manufacturer of and dealer in
Harness. Saddles, Bridies, Collars, Whfjis,
A.C., which will be sold at bottom price-*. Ke
pairing promptly attended to. Shop on Cnu
(■lngham street, near creek,
HHTI.KR. PA
FOB SALE.
•5 will liny a one-halt interest in a hu«-
ineos 111 Pittsburgh. One who knows some
thing about farming preferred. An honest man
with the above amount «ill do well to address
by letter, SMITH JOHNS, care 8. M. James,
9:1 Liberty street, Pittsburgh, Pa. |nu27-ly
" NICK CRILEY.
PHOTOGRAPHER,
(Io old Sun Bykes Gallery,)
decll-ly BUTLKB, PA.
DECORATIATJ UPHOLSTERY A
SPECIALTY AT
HENRY HOLTZMAN'S,
74 Wood Street, Pittsburgh, Pa.
PRACTICAL UPHOLSTERER.
Special Dosij;nh made to harmonize with sur
roundings of every apartment of your home
for Window D<* orations, the richest selections
and latest doetgns in Raw Silks, Satins. Jutes.
Crepets, esc. Lace Curtains, from the cheapest
to tbe very tlnest of all s at very low
prices ; I.ace Lambrequins made to order to fit
anv sized window, iu the very latent designs;
Cornices and Ccrnicn Poles. Dado Bottom Shades
in various designs, Beddings, Comforts, Pillows,
Mosquito Bare, etc. 0c22-3m
Police.
In the matter of tho Account of W. P. Braliam,
Asiiignce of A. G. Steen.
I hereby give notice to ail persons interested,
that as Assignee of A G. Hteen I have filed my
final account in the office of the Pro honotary
of tbe Court of Common Pleas of Bntler coun
ty. Pa., and that tho snmo will be presented to
said Court for confirmation on tl.e 3rd day of
December, IH7O. At the s&me time I will make
application to said Court for leave to reconvey
; tho property in my hands to said Asaignor.
I oct 22-31 W. P. BRA HAM.
BUTLER, PA., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12. 1879.
PHYSICIANS.
JOHN* E BYKRS,
PHYSICIAN AND SURG EON,
! my'Jl-ly] HUTLER, PA.
INSURANCE.
~BUTL EK "COUNTY
Mutual Fire Insurance Co.
Office Cor. Main and Cunningham Sts.
G. C. ROESSING, PRESIDENT.
WM CAMPBELL, TREASURER
H. C. IIEINEMAN, SKCRETART
DIRECTORS:
J. L. Purvis, E. A. Ilelmboldt,
William Campbell, J. -W. Buikbart,
A. Troatman, Jacob Schoene,
G. C. Roessing, John Caldwell,
Dr. \V. lrvln, Samuel Marshall,
J. W.Chrl6ty • 11. C. Heineman.
JAS. T* M'JUNKIN, Gen. A«'t-
BTTTI-.ER FA
LAND FOR SALE.
Executors' Sale.
The m-dergigned offer at private Bale tho
farm of A. Troutman, Sr., situate in Penn town
ship. Butler conntv, Pa., fonr miles south of
the borough of Bntler. This farm contains
S3 Acres,
and is in a high state of cultivation, (rood
buildings thereon ; orchard of ISO bearing fruit
trees of the bet-t quality: well watered ; well
timbered ; all under good fenco ; in fact one of
the bet-t (arms in Penn township. Also con
venient to churches, and schoolhouse within 2')
rods. All tillable land. Terms veiv reasonable.
Inquire of GEOItOE THOU I'M AN.
or OEORGE WALTER,
oct22-4t Executors. Butler, Pa.
-j-/» T7 Want a FARM or HOME, with
| I YOll independence and plenty in vour
old age,
THE BE3T THING IN THE WEST
IS THE
Atchison, Topekafc Santa Fe R. R.
L At. PS I N KACS/S.
Circulars with map. giving full information,
FREE. Address A. S. Johnson, Land Com'r,
Topeka, Kansas. octls-lm
For teale.
The well-improved fa-m of Rev. W. R. Hutch
ison, in the northeast corner of Middlesex town
ship, Butler coni.ty. Pa . is now offered for sale
low. Inquire of W. K. FRISBEE, on the prem
iisee. aplGtf
2.500,000 ACRRS LAND
Situated in and near the
UPPER ARKANSAS VALLEY, IN SOUTH
WESTERN KANSAS,
—ON THE- •
Atchisoa, Topeka & Santa Fc R. R.
11 Years' Credit. 7 per cent. Interest.
Tie first payment at d itc of purchase Is one
tenth of the principal and seven percent, inter
est on the remainder. At the end of the first
and second year, only the Interest at seven per
cent, is paid ; and the third year, and each year
thereafter, one tenth ot the principal, with
seven per cent. Interest on the balai.ee, Is paid
annually until the whole is paid.
Six years' credit, 20 per cent, discount.
Two years' crcdil, 30 per cent, discount.
Cash purchase, 33 l-S percent, discount.
The valley of the Upper Aikan«-as is justly
celebrated for its adaptability to WHEAT
RAISING rnd the superior qu.ilitv of its train.
As aSTOCK KAISINGand WOOL-GROWING
country, it olieis advantages that cannot be ex
celled. Good soil, abundance of pure water, a
mild and remarkably healthy climate, with low
prices and easy terms, make up a total of In
ducements greater than isofleicd anywhere else
on tbe continent of America.
For lull particulars, Inquire of or address
0 A. SEYMOUR,
General Eastern Passenger
my2l-lyl 410 Broadway. N. Y.
199 Main St. Buffalo, N. Y.
LIVERY.
LIVERY'STABLE!
rf... Having leased the Livery Stable
\f~ formerly occupied by George
f-j Walter, in the rear of tho Vo
n Relty House, Butler, Pa., and
removed
ALL MY STOCK
to it, including Horses, Carnages. Buggies, Ac.,
the public are solicited to give me a cah.
All my stock is in first class order, and per
nons wishing to hire will be accommodated on
the mofct reasonable terms and at the shortest
notice. [oc22-3ml GEORGE BAUER.
TIIK OI.D STAXI)
LIVERY STABLE.
The public are respectfully informed that I
have now taken the entire possession of the
Old Stand
LIVERY STABLE,
formerly known &H Bickel A Co., 011 Went Cun
ningham ntreet, Butler, Pa.
llorftCN an«l Vehicles
are all first-class and in good order. Punctual
attendance given to customers and others at all
hours.
Tho books of the firm of Bickol A Bauer are
witli me for settlement.
oct22-2iii HENRY BICKEL.
Livery, Feed and Sale
STABLE,
Cunningham St., near Helneman's Bookstore,
BUTLER, PA.
A large number of first-class riL r « and safe
liorfcH a I WAV* "i: hand. Hones ted m reasona
ble rates. Horses bought aud sold.
DAVID CUPPS, PROPHIETOB.
julySOtf
IJ. M. COCIIR.4X,
lively, Sale, Feed and Exchange
STABLE,
Ilear of Lowry House, • - BUTLER, PA.
june4-ly
ALL PARTIES
GOI.NO WEST TO
lowa,
Missouri,
Kansas,.
Nebraska,
Colorado or
California,
SHOULD GO VIA THE
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy R. R.
CaTTickots can be had at all offices where
Wostern tickets are sold. aplG-tf
(Jood Homes in (antral Missouri
Can be obtained on '.he 1 est terms, through the
Callaway County Ii ■rni,.' ation ; ociety.
For full partiCul&i f address tlie President,
WM ' tt Wk
LIWT OF .IUROBB
Drawn for December Term, 1879, Com
mencing First Monday and First Day.
GRAND JURY.
Adams —J. R. Orr.
Brady—William Mayer.
Centre—Asa Thompson.
Cherry—Job Kcllv, Perry Wolford.
Clay—Frank Markwell.
Clinton—Robert Harvey.
Connoqueneaaing—J. L. Wilson.
Donegal—M. Angert, Adam Kemerer.
Forward—Adam Rader, Sr.
Jackson —11. 11. Weiss, Freeman Weise.
Jefferson —John McGucken. Gotlieb Zimmer
man.
Lancaster—Charles Warner.
Marion—Michael McAnallan.
Mercer—Andrew Dunlap.
Middlesex —Samuel B. Harbison.
Oakland—George Shopp.
Parker—J. D. Daubenspeck.
Penn—John Walters.
Slipperyroek —Henry Sanderson.
Centreville —A. G. Taggart.
TRAVERSE jrRY— IST WEEK—IST DAY.
Allegheny—James Blane, Johij Grant.
Brady—Daniel Keefer, Conrad Snyder, Sr.
Buffalo—Jacob Shuster.
Butler—Peter Kiess.
Centre —W. A. Christy, Christian Fleeger,
Christian Graham.
Cherry—George Christy.
Clay—Robert Gould, Albert Miller.
Clinton —Albert Flick.
Concord—A. C. Darragh.
Connoquenessing—Hiram Graham, M. N.
Stevenson.
Donegal—John Gegan, Henry Sheffield.
Fairview—Lawrence McLaughlin.
Forward —Zeno Mark ell.
Jackson—David Barto, Samuel Cooper.
Jefferson —James Johnston.
Lancaster—AVilliam. J. Scott.
Mercer —W. E. Reed.
Middlesex —Philip Stiner.
Muddycreek—Wm. Heberling, Wm. Payne.
Oakland—J. F. Moser.
Parker—Lemuel Davis.
Penn—Wilson Garvin.
Slipperyroek—H. L. Rhodes, Henry Wolford.
Summit—Jame3 Skihnan.
Washington—John Fithian, Ezekiel Lewis,
W. D. Thompson.
Wiruield —George Rcighart.
Worth—John Payne, W. 11. Walters.
Butler borough—B. F. Crow, George Reno,
A. C. Roessing.
Fairview—R. W. McKee, J. A. Wilson.
Karns City—G. Woodring, Robert Graham.
Sunbury—C. P. Temple.
2ND WEEK— BTH DAY.
Allegheny—P. P. Porterfield.
Adams—Detmer Doutliett, Joseph Miller.
Brady—James Alexander.
Buffalo—John Beattv.
Butler—Joseph Addleman, Frank Cf.ok,
Henry Kalb, John Ralston.
Centre—James Rose.
Clay—Ambrose Patterson.
Clinton—John Wiley, Robert Hemphill.
Concord —W. W. Christy, H. J. Miller, J. S.
Mortland, T. J. McCandless.
Connoquenessing—John Burris, A. G. Stew
art, Conrad Nicholas.
Cranberry—Frank Confer, Fred. I.nntrharst.
Donegal —James Gillespie, Owen Shirkcy.
Fairview —11. 11. Seibert.
Franklin—William Wadsworth.
Jefferson —Martin Gephart, Wm. J. Redick.
Lancaster —Leonard Moritz.
Middlesex—Wm. Cranner, David McCaslin,
Richard Almstead.
Muddycreek—James Mcßirney.
Oakland—John Leightner, Peter Whitmire.
Parker —T. P. Mechling.
Penn —William V. Seaman.
81ipperyrock—R. McCoy, Wm. Recti.
Washington—John Emery.
Winfield —William Gallagher, Wm. Leasure,
John Rivers.
Worth—Peter Neeley.
Karns City—F. Wagoner.
Petrolia —11. S. Hawkins, A. N. Rice.
Don't You Do It!
DON'T BE SO FOOLISH A 8 TO BUY
AN OLD STYLE
Sewing Machine,
No matter how great its name, or how loud
Its pretensions, when for less
money yon can get
The Best Invented
as well as
The Latest Improved,
THE SELF THREADING
Dauntless!
The only Machine made which has
Shuttle, Take-Up and Tensions
Entirehj Self-Th readintj.
The DAUNTLESS also makes the most perfect
Lock-Stitch, has the most Ing- nioiis sepa
rate Bobbin-Winder, largest Arm Space
and Wide Feed, Hi i plest Mechan
ism, most stylish Furniture,
and
Handsomest Plating and Ornamentation in
the Market.
It Sews Anything ! It BeaH Everything! 1
it Pleases Everybody!! 1
ijjgpSewing Machine Dealers everywhere will
ttml it to iheir Interest to order ttie Dauntless,
and get Factory Prices. For terms, territory,
(Sc., apply to The Daautless Manufacturing '
Compun\, Norwalk, 'Jhlo, or to •
L. 11. SLAGLE,
jylll-fim East Brady, CI u ion Co , Pa.
'2oth. Y ear.
ESTABLISHED 1853.
H. McCALLUM,
77 Fifth Ave., Above Wood St.,
PITTMBITIIUII, FA.
CARPETS,
OIL CLOTHS,
&c., &c.
The beet quality that is raado of tho different
kinds of
CARPETING
ocl-aml AT LOWEST THICKS.
made in 87 d&vn. 70 page catalogue
Sf M II I free. BUCKEYE NOVELTY CO.,
|WW [ns-3m| CIWHIMCATI, OHIO.
.4 BRAVE GIRL.
MISS MEEKER'S STORY OE HER CAPTURE
[Alamosa (Col.) Dispatch toN. Y. Herald.]
Mr?. Meeker, her daughter, Joseph
ine, and Mrs. Price and her two child
ren have been detained here two days
on account of Mrs. Meeker's illness,
caused by nervous reaction, after a ter
rible journey of five hundred miles on
stages and Indian ponies, bareback
and with poor saddles, over mountains
and alkali deserts. During this ordeal
she was only half clad in a calico dress
and a single shawl, without blankets,
and had only tbe bare ground to sleep
on in tbe Indian camps. The party
leaves for Denver in a day or two,
going thence to their home in Greeley.
Miss Josephine Meeker was threatened
with death, aud her escape was a nar
row one. She is a blonde, with blue
eves aud light hair, and is tall in stat
ure, and vivacious in manner and con
versation. She was a teacher at the
agency and a great favorite among the
Indians. She taught the boy of Chief
Douglass, aud had half a dozen offers
of marriage from the Ute braves. Iler
quick wit and knowledge of the lan
guage undoubtedly saved her life.
HOW THE MASSACRE BEGAN.
Miss Meeker says : "I was in the
kitchen with my mother washing the
dishes. It was afternoon I looked
out of the window and saw the Utes
shooting the boys who were working
on the new building. Mrs. Price was
at the door washing clothes. She
rushed in and took Johnny, the baby,
to fly. Just then Frank Dresser, an
employe, staggered in, shot through
the leg. I said, 'Here, Frank, is Mr.
Price's gun.' It lay on tbe bed. He
took it, and just as we were fleeing out
by the door the windows were
smashed in and half a dozen shots
were fired into the room. Frank
Dresser fired and killed Johnson's
brother. We ran into the milk room,
which had only oDe small window,
and locked the door and hid under a
shelf. Firing went on for several
hours at intervals. There was no
shouting, no noise, but frequent firing.
While waiting in this horrid suspense
Dresser said he had gone to the em
ployes' rooms, where all guns were
stored, but found them stolen. In the
intervals of shooting Dresser would
exclaim : 'There goes one of the gov
ernment guns.' Their sound was
quite different from those of the In
dians. We stayed in the milk room
until it began to fill with smoke. The
sun was half an hour high.
A DASH FOR LIFE.
I took May Price, three years old,
and we all ran to father's room. It
was not disturbed. The papers and
books were just as he left them.
'Pepy's Diary' lay open on the table.
We knew the building would be
burned and ran across Douglass ave
nue for a field of sage brush beyond
the ploughed ground. The Utes were
so busy stealing the annuity goods
that they did not see us at first.
About thirty of them, loaded with
blankets, were carrying them toward
Douglass' camp, near the river. Wc
had gone one hundred yards when the
Utes saw us. They threw down the
blankets and came running towards us
firing as they came. Bullets whizzed
as thick as grasshoppers around us. I
do not think they intended to kill us—
only to frighten us—but they tried to
shoot Frank Dresser, who had almost
reached the sage brush.
Mother was hit by a bullet, which
went through her underclothing and
made a flesh wound three inches long.
As the Indians came nearer they
shouted: 'We no shoot! Come to
us!' I had the little girl, and the
Indian named Pursune said for me to
go with him. He and another Ute
seized me by the arms and started to
ward the river. An Uncompahgre
Indian took Mrs. Price and her baby
and mother was taken to the head
quarters of Douglass. We came to a
wide irrigating canal which father had
the Indians build. I said I could not
cross it. Tbe Indians answered by
pushing me through the water: I had
on only moccasins, and the water and
mud were deep. The baby waded,
too, and both of us came out wet to
the skin.
A QUARREL TO POSSESS HER.
As we were walking in Chief Joseph
came and pushed away Pursune and,
in great anger, told him to give me up.
I understood some of tbe language.
Pursune refused to surrender me.
Hot words ensued aud I feared the
men would fight for a moment. I
thought I would ask Douglass to take
me, but as both were drunk I kept
silent and afterwards was glad I did
not go.
Douglass finally went away and wo
walked on toward the river. Before
reaching tbe stream, not more than
[ two hundred yards away, both my
conductors pulled out bottles and
drank twice. No whisky was sold at
the agency. Their bottles were not
agency bottles. The Indian, Pursune,
took me to where his ponies were
standing by the river and seated me
on a pile of blankets while he went for
more. The Indians were now on all
sides. I could uot escape. Pursune
packed his effects, all stolen from the
agency, on a government mule which
was taller than a tall man.
. He had two mules stolen from the
agency. It was now sundown. Pack
ing was finished at dark, and we
started for tbe wilderness of the south.
I rode a horse with a saddle, but no
bridle. The baiter-strap was so short
that it dropped continually. Tbe
child was lashed behind me. Pursune
and his assistant rode each side of me,
driving the pack mules ahead. About
twenty other Indians were in the
party.
MRS. MEEKER'S SAD PLIGHT.
Mother came later, riding bareback
behind Douglass, both on one horse.
She was sixty-four years old, feeble iti
health, wounded and not recovered
from a broken thigh, caused by a fall
two years ago. Chief Douglass gave
her neither horse, saddle nor blankets.
We followed the river, and on the
other side Pursune brought me a hat
ful of water to drink. We trotted
along until nine o'clock, when wo
halted for half an hour. All the In-
dians dismounted and blankets were
spread on the ground and I laid down
to rest, with mother lying not far from
me.
Chief Douglass was considerably
excited, and made a speech to me with
many gestures and great emphasis,
lie recited his grievances and ex
plained why the massacre began. He
said Thornburgh told the Indians that
he was going to arrest the head chiefs,
take them to Fort Steele and put them
in the calaboose—perhaps hang them.
He said my father had written all
the letters to the Denver papers, and
circulated wild reports about what the
Indians would do, as set forth bv tho
Western press, and that he was re
sponsible for all the hostility against
the Indians among the whites in the
West.
A STRANGE PICTURE STORY.
He said pictures of the agent and
all his family, women and children,
had been found on Thornburgh's body
just before the attack on the agency,
and the pictures were covered with
blood and showed marks of knives on
different parts of the bodies. The
throats were cut. The one of the
agent had a bullet-hole in his head.
He said I was represented in one of
the pictures as shot through the breast.
Douglass said my father had made
these pictures, representing the pros
pective fate of his family, and sent
them to Washington to lie used to in
fluence the soldiers and hurry troops
forward to fight the Indians. This
remarkable statement, strange as it
may seem, was afterward told me by a
dozen different Indians, and the recital
aud the particulars were always the
same.
While Douglass was telling this he
stood in front of me with his gun, and
his anger was dreadful. Then he
shouldered his gun and walked up and
down before me in the moonlight and
imitated the employes who had kept
guard at the agency for three nights
before the massacre. He mocked them
and sneered and laughed at them and
said he was 'a heap big Indian.' Then
he sang English songs which he had
heard the boys sing in their rooms at
the agency. He sang the negro mel
ody, 'Swing Low, Sweet Chariot,"
and asked me if I understood. I told
him I did, because he had the words
and tune perfectly committed.
He said father had always been
writing to Washington. He always
saw him writing when lie came to the
agency. It was write, write, write all
day, he said. Then he swore a fear
ful oath in English, and said if the
soldiers had not come and threatened
the Indians with Fort Steele and the
calaboose and threatened to kill the
other Indians at White River, the
agent wouldn't have been massacred.
Then the brave Chief Douglass, who
had eaten at our table that very day,
walked off a few feet, returned and
placed his loaded gun to my forehead
three times and asked me if I was
going to runaway? I told him I was
not afraid of him nor of death, and
should not run away.
When he found his repeated threats
could not frighten me all the other In
dians turned on him and laughed at
him, and made so much fun of him
that he sneaked off and went over to
frighten my mother. I heard her cry
'Oh 1' and I supposed that she thought
some terrible fate had befallen me. I
shouted to her that I was not hurt;
that she need not lie afraid ; that they
were only trying to scare her. The
night was still, but 1 heard no re
sponse. The Indians looked at each
other.
GALLANT PURSUNE.
All hands took a drink around my
bed ; then they saddled their horses,
and Pursune led my horse to me and
knelt down on has hands and knees
for me to mount my horse from his
back. He always did this, and when
he was absent his wife did it. I -saw
Pursune do the same gallant act once
for his squaw, but it was only once,
and none of the other Indians did it
at all.
We urged our horses forward and
journeyed in the moonlight through
to the Grand Mountain with the In
dians talking in low tones among
themselves. The little three-year old
May Price, who was fastened behind
me, cried a few times, for she was
cold and had had no supper, and her
mother was away in Jack's camp, but
the child was generally quiet. It was
after midnight when we made the
second halt in a.deep and sombre can
yon, with tremendous mountains
towering «n every side. Mother was
not allowed to come up. Douglass
kept her with him half a mile further
down the ravine. Pursune had plenty
of blankets, which were stolen from
the agency. He spread some for my
lied and rolled up some for my pillow,
and told me to retire.
MOCKED BY THE SQUAWS.
Then the squaws came and laughed,
and grinned and gibbered in their own
grim way. We had reached the camp
Douglass had chosen for the Indian
women who had been sent to the can
yon previous to the massacre. Jack's
camp, where Mrs. Price was kept, was
live or six miles away in another can
yon. When 1 had lain down on tho
blankets two squaws, one old and one
young, caine to the bed and sang and
danced fantastically and joyously at
my feet. The other Indians stood
around, and when the women reached
a certain part of their recitative they
all broke into laughter. Toward the
end of their song my captor, Pursune,
gave each of them a newly stolen Gov
ernment blanket, which they took and
then went away. The strangeness and
wild novelty of my position kept me
awake until toward morning, when I
fell, into a doze, and did not awake
until the sun was shining over tho
mountains. Next day Pursune went
to fight the soldiers, and he placed me
in charge of his wife with her three
children.
That same day mother come up to
see me, in company with a little In
dian girl. On Wednesday, the next
day, Johnson went over to Jack's
camp and brought back Mrs. Prico and
her baby to live in his camp. Ho said
he had made it all right with tho other
Utes. We did not do anything but bo
around the various camps and listen to
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exceeding ouc-foiirtli of a colnmn, <5 per inch.
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made. Local advertisements 10 cculs per lino
for flrrt insertion, awl 5 cent* pc-r line for each
ad iition&l insertion. and deaths pub
lished free of charge. Obituary notice* charged
as adrert:««'mcrits. anJ payable when handed ill
Auditor*' Notices, e4 ; Executors' and Adminis
(ratein' Notices. #3 each; Estray. Caution and
Dissolution Notices, not exceeding ten linee, 13
each.
From the fact that the CITIZEN is the oldest
established aud moist extensively circulated Re
1 nblican newsj.aper in Butler county, (a Repub
lican county) it must be apparent to business
cif u that it is the medium they should use in
advertising their business.
NO. 50.
the talk of the squaws whose hus
bands were away fighting the soldiers.
"ONE TOUCH OF NATURE."
On Wednesday and on the other
days one of Supanzisquait's three
squaws put her hand on my shoulder
and said: "Poor little girl, I feel so
sorry. You have no father and you
are away oft' with the Utes so far from
home." She cried at the time and said
her own little child had just died and
her heart was sore. When Mrs. Prico
came into camp another squaw took
her baby, Johnny, into her arms and
wept over him and said, in Ute, that
she felt very sorry for the captives.
I asked the Indians before Brady
came where the soldiers were.
They replied that the}* were "still in
that cellar," and the Indians were kill
ing their ponies when they went for
water in the night. They said : "In
dians stay on mountains and see white
soldier ; soldiers no see Indians. White
soldier not knew how to fight.
PERILS OF FALSE TEETH.
Fame and fortune await the man
who has genius to write the history of
false teeth and illustrate the danger
which invariably attends them. Were
some one to rise who should apply to
this subject the patient toil which the
elder Disraeli did to the oddities and
eccentricities of literary life and study,
he would confer an imperishable favor
upon civilization. His work would
be not only a source of amusement for
the reading world, but a perpetual
warning of the perils which besot all
who must depend upon the dentist in
stead of upon nature for the means
wherewith to grind their daily bread.
In proof of which the following is a
case in point: In Wayland, Xew
York, there lives a dentist, Preston by
name. Likewise lives their a man to
the world unknown, save that he was
the promised husband of a lady whom
we shall call Miss Smith, resident of
Klmira. Prom the dentist mentioned
she had purchased a set of false teeth
—on credit. The credit lasted longer
than his patience, and when she vis
ited Wavland, presumably to see her
lover, the dentist called upon her and
inquired how the teeth served her.
She mentioned a defect, and took them
out that he might investigate it.
Sticking them in his pocket he made
answer to her : "You can have them
when you pay me for them," and
walked away.
Troubles never come singly. For
while she sat in solitude gnashing her
gums at the heartless dentist, her lover
rapped at the door. She made sign
thut she could not see him then. lie
was astonished, and firmly demanded
an explanation. But Miss Smith
could not give him one—certainly not
one which he could understand. The
dentist carried off not only her teeth,
but her power to articulate. But an
explanation he was bound to have.
He received it from the lady friends of
Miss Smith, who put the case in its
very best light. They knew not when
they might be forced to beg a like
kindness for themselves. Women's
teeth, like their temper, are uncertain
things. The case was not a pleasant
one in any light, and he took occasion
to tell Miss Smith so in a letter next
day. In fact heplumply declared that
he would not marry a woman who,
through all the tender confidence of
their wooing, had concealed from him
the fact that her sweet words were
spoken by tho aid of store teeth. A
woman who would deceive him in one
thing might in another. How could
he know but that the silken tresses
which had flowed over his shoulder
on various blissful occasions caine not
from the hand of nature, but from that
of the wig maker? He was in dis
tressing doubt as to how much real
and how much artificial woman he
had been courting. He resolved to
settle the doubt by withdrawing his
engagement.
The matter has ended in the court
of love and now goes up (or perhaps it
should be down) to the Court of law.
Miss Smith will enter suit against the
dentist to recover $5,000 damage as
the result of losing a husband through
the dentist's act of running away with
her teeth and leaving her unable to
make an explanation at the most criti
cal point of her life. She will also
bring suit against her love for breach
of promise. His defence, of course,
will be that Le was deceived, and it is
against a maxim of law that either
woman or man shall benefit by his or
her own wrong. He had contracted
in good faith for a woman made by
nature, and an attempt was made, he
believes, to palm off ou him one partly
the handiwork of dentist and wig
maker.— Pittsburgh Telegraph.
As artisan of Altoona, Pa., has
been working for seventeen years on a
"wonderful clock," which is to bo
ready for exhibition next New Years.
It parades sixty-five automatic figures
—a beer garden with men drawing
beer and passing it out; a linseed oil
mill in running order, with a dozen
workmen engaged in different parts of
the business; a blacksmith shop with
men hammering iron and others shoe
ing horses ; women bringing refresh
ments ; a summer house, fountains and
games in progress; a quarry with men
hewing stone; a saw-mill turning out
mineature boards; a shoe factory, with
men and women working at different
parts of shoes; a grist mill, with a
man bringing grain to a hopper, and
others carrying the bags away, whilo
buckets go up and down and mill
stones buzz; residences where visitors
call and servants are about their work,
etc., etc., etc. The mills are driven by
water which falls from the top and is
drawn up again. The whole compli
cated contrivance is run by a weight
of ninrty pounds.
IN Belgrade cases of suicide are so
unknown that recently, when a rich
merchant killed himself in a fit of in
sanity, the whole population turned out
and was intensely excited. Insanity
is very raro in Servin.
IT is estimated that over 2,500,000
people have taken up homes in the West
and South in the past five years. „

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