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Butler citizen. (Butler, Pa.) 1877-1922, December 10, 1879, Image 2

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BUTLER CITIZEN.
JOHN M. 4 W. C. NE6LEY. PROP'BS.
SEVERAL communications have been
crowded out this week for want of
space to insert them.
THKRE will be no session of the
Legislature this winter to disturb the
public mind, for which the people of
the State will feel thankful.
MB. ANTHONY ALLEN, of Zelieno
ple, has been appointed by the Com
missioners Mercantile Appraiser of
this county for the coming year.
COURT convened again on Monday,
with Judge McJunkin and Associates
Storey and Dodds on the Bench. The
trial of criminal cases is progressing,
an account of which will be given
next week.
IN a case before tbe Supreme Court
from Washington county, at the late
term, a test question as to whether a
wife or a mother is heiress to the estate
of an illegitimate child, was decided
in favor of the mother.
THE editor of the Eagle, Thomas
Robinson, Esq., affects not to under
stand why the Pittsburgh Commercial
Gazette should allude to hirn in con
nection with the National bank affairs
of this place. To any one who bad
been noticing tbe slang and insinua
tions used toward Mr. Reed in the
Eagle, it was not surprising to see
that Mr. Robinson should have got a
shot back in a tender place. And be
sides, a near relative of Mr. Reed is
one that may lose money in the bank
by tbe failure, so far, of its debtors, like
Mr. Robinson, to pay what they
owe it. His piteous whinings and
begging of mercy from tbe Gazette is,
therefore, all characteristic hypocrisy
and deceit. His insinuations lately as
to this paper have been equally ma
licious and false, to which, until now,
we have paid no attention. Last week
be charges that tbe Gazette and CITI
ZEN are organs of what he terms a
syndicate, whatever that may be. In
reply we have only to say that, unlike
him, we are tbe organ of no person or
persons, save only of the right, and t-i
give news to the community that it
onght to have. In regard to tbe Na
tional bank, ont of consideration for
some parties, we hive not given all
that perhaps should have been. He,
being a debtor to the bank, accounts
for his different action and motives.
Bnt tbe public are not deceived. Cov
ering up property with mortgages and
giving other parts away, as is alleged,
and then biding behind tbe name of
another in tbe abuse be puts in bis
paper, is bad enough, but deceives no
one. But all tbis has caused the fre
quent expressions used in this commu
nity when bis manners are referred to,
soch as "natural sneak," "hypocrite
and liar," "a nuisance," etc.
Death of Judge Ketcham.
Hon. Winthrop W. Ketcham, Uni
ted States Judge for tbe Western Dis
trict of Pennsylvania, died suddenly
at his hotel in Pittsburgh, on Saturday
night last, from apoplexy. Judge
Ketcham was a very amiable arid
worthy man and a true friend. He
was also an able and impartial Judge,
and bis integrity on tbe Bench or in
any other official position he ever held,
was never questioned. He was ap
pointed Judge in 1876, in place of
Hon. Wilson McCandless, resigned,
and bis death makes a vacancy that,
from tbe duties of that office, will have
soon to be filled. There are but few
public men whose death will be more
sincerely regretted. He was aged 58
years. His remains were taken to
tbe place of his family
residence.
Tho President's Meesage.
Tbe most important parts of Presi
dent Hayes' recent message to Con
gress will l>e found upon the first page
of the CITIZEN tbis week. They will
be read with interest and all approved
of, excepting his recommendation or
views as to the retiring of the legal
tender or greenback currency. His
views on this took the country gener
ally by surprise, coming so soon after
resumption and the successful efforts
of tbe Government in getting the
greenback at par with coin. All par
ties are of the decided opinion that
money matters are working so well
that there should lie a rest from any
agitation, and hence the President's
views were immediately opposed by
bis party friends in Congress and by
tbe Republican press generally, and
he has wisely abandoned tbern or
at least caused it to Is: known that he
has no desire to further press them.
Death of John T. Bard, Esq.
John T. Bard, Esq., of Centreville,
tbis county, died at his residence on
Thursday last, aged 63 years. But
few men of the county were better
known or exercised more influence
than Mr. Bard. In business matters
be was a man of decided tact and
energy, and as a party leader always
bad a controlling influence with his
friends. In 1851 he was elected Pro
tbonotary of the county, and on sev
eral occasions since was chosen to posts
of honor by bis party, the last of
which was as the Democratic nominee
for Congress in tbis district, in which
position be displayed that honesty of
purpose and principle that distin
guished bim through life. Although
defeat stared him in the face he yet
adhered to bis standard. He will be
remembered and bis personal charac
ter admired by all who knew him.
His funeral, we understand, was very
largely attended on Friday last.
The Butler Back.
HON. JOHN M. GREF.R AND THOS. BOB
INsON, E>Q.. DISOIJARtiED AFTER A
FL'LL HEARING ON SATURDAY.
Some three weeks ago criminal in
• formations were made against the offi
cers of the Butler National Bank, and
in one of its informations Hon. John
M. Greer and Thos. Robinson, Esq..
were charged with being aiders aDd
abettors, in having had a note for
$1.212.65 discounted by the bank when
they, tbe officers of the institution,
knew them to be insolvent. Bail wa=
entered for their appearance o'n Satur
dav last, when a hearing took place.
• Both tbe parties named proved to tbe
satisfaction of U. S. Commissioner
McCandless that they did not connive
with the officers of tbe bink, and that
they were innocent of wrong intention,
and" that they believed they would be
able t3 pay tbe note and intended
doing so. The Commissioner dis
charged them, as there was no evi
dence showing any fraud.
The above we clip from the Pitts
burgh Commercial Gazette of Monday
and publish it in justice to the parties
i named, just as we published from the
seme paper when the informations
were made against them. We could
not see at the time how they could be
implicated as mere borrowers from the
1 bank, but did not know what evidence
might be produced on the charge of
aiding and abetting the taking of so
much of its funds. People are in the
! habit of getting money from banks if
' they can, and its tbe bank's business
to know whether they are solvent or
: insolvent before they get the money.
! In this case it therefore rests on the
management of tbe bank, and Messrs.
Greer and Robinson having shown
that they used no fraud in obtaining
the money, or at least no evidence
being produced to that effect, they
were properly discharged.
Communicated.
Editor* Citizen —Having in" com
pany with a great many others l>een
compelled to pay a royalty on a patent
slide or roller gate, arid finding that
the parties have no right under the
rulings of tbe United States District
Court to collect the same, I deem it
my dutv to make public the following
decision which I clip from the Ameri
can Agriculturist:
"The suit* for th<> recovery of a royally on a
farm gate extonshrelv used in Michigan an<i
other State* of the North went, have l««n set
tle adversely to the plaintiff, by a decision in
the United Stnt/« District Court, at Detroit,
this week, Monday. The contrivance in qnes
tion u the plain gate, without hiu/es, sliding
on a stationary cross-piece, or rolling on a
roller, till the gate U removed half across the
gateway, and then, being balanced, swins(i:ig
aronoil as on a pivot. This form of mailing
gates is a ifreat favorite with the community,
as it can all lie made in a few hour*, and can
be bandied with the greatest convenience.
Huits were brought against a large number of
fanners in the eastern part of the State, and
several thousand dollars were collected in a
single county before the defendant- eould bring
about arrangement* to protect themselves. The
first content was with a elaim tinder the so
called Lee patent, iu wl.ich the parties demand
ing a royalty were defeated. The case just
decided by the United Stales Court at Detroit
was brought under the Teal patent. The
decision in favor of the parties twin* the gate
wait based on the fact that the device was given
to* the public by a cut in tl.e American A'/ri
cilturi #, and quite generally used two year*
More the patent wa* applied for. Under the
United H tales I'd tent I-awn, no claim would be
worth anything under these circumstances, and
by contesting it, the farmers of Michigan have
saved themselves from being bled thousands of
dollars."
Yours, etc., Fnui. IIKIUEB.
CONGRESSMAN Harry White, of the
Indiana district, in this State, proposes
to introduce in the House a resolution
to amend tbe National Constitution, in
reference to appropriation bills, in a
way which ought to satisfy everybody,
and secure unanimous support both in
Congress and in the Legislatures of
the several States. His amendment
will provide, as the Constitution of
Pennsylvania now does, that appropri
ations" shall be stated by items, and
that any one of these may be voted,
without afTecting the remainder of the
bill. This arrangement provides one of
the best safeguards against jobbery or
recklesscxpendituies; it would save the
country, with a fearless and independ
ent Executive, millions of dollars per
annum. Mr. White also projKJses to
provide that tbe general appropriation
bills "shall contain nothing but appro
priations for the ordinary expenses of
the different departments of the Gov
ernment, ami interest on the debt. All
other appropriations shall be made by
bills containing only items of appropri
ations relating to tbe subject matter of
the bill." This would exclude "politi
cal riders," and would prevent the quar
rels arid contentions between Congress
aud the President, growing out of at
tempts by tbe former to compel him to
accept legislation by putting it in a bill
with the needed supplies for carrying
on the Government. Mr. White's amend
ments are wise in principle, and ought
to be made part of the organic law at
once.
J I;ST twenty years ago yesterday,
John Brown was hanged at Charlea
town, Virginia. With a little baud of
twenty men he seized llar|>cr'a Kerry
for the purpose of inaugurating a grand
liberation of the slaves. Nothing could
have been more foolhardy, and in a
short time the old man and his little
band were besieged in the engine house
of the Government arsenal. The Vir
ginia militia discreetly kept out of the
range of Brown's rifles, but a company
of United States marines carried the
place by assault after tbe old man was
severely wounded, and nearly all his
adherents including his two sons were
killed. Brown was tried and hung for
treason, and the heroic manner he bore
himself throughout won the admiration
of his enemies. Gne of Brown's party
was a colored man named Anderson,
whose father lived in West Chester a
number of years. Anderson escaped
capture with another man by being cut
off from the engine house by the cordon
of troops, and when they found them
selves unable to join their commander,
fled to Pennsylvania.— Village Record,
Dec. .'J.
BRIDMKSAND KOAIJU.—In all parts of
the State there is a demand for free
bridges, the old toll system having be
come odious to the great mass of people.
There is no doubt that toll bridges art:
vn impediment to travel and an in
jury to local merchandising. But be
fore we have a system of free bridges,
let us have better township roads.
The township roads of Pennsylvania
are not what they ought to Is:, arid never
have been. In the meantime let the
agitation on the subject of free bridges
be coupled with a movement for Im
proved township roads.— Beaver Ar
gus
UntUe Citizen: UniUr, fl*., lElecetubuej: 10, ts?9*
' Beauties of Civilized Warfare.
LONDON, NOT 22.—A letter from
Autofopasta, in a supplement to the
Star and Herald, Panama, giving tbe
details of the fight with the Peruvian
iron clail Huascar,says: "The scenes
on board the Huascar at the moment of
tbe surrender, baffled description, and
on seeing the wreck composed of pieces
of thick iron twisted into every eon
eeiveable shape, splinters of wood,
broken rifles, swords and furniture, all
mixed UJI with fragments of flesh, the
deck flowing in blood, one could gaze in
wonder at the deadly effect of modern
arms. The cabin of the commander
was a wreck, and where it existed were
a number of dead bodies. The only
part that could be found of Commander
Grau was a foot and the small part of
one leg. Tbe body of the second com
mander was in a frightful condition,
one of the balls had struck him on the
head, carrying the whole of the upper
part away and leaving only a fragment
of the lower jaw, with a part of the
beard attached. In the right leg were
four wounds, and the right arm and
side were completely mashed. Accor
ding to the Huascar's roster there are
over sixty persons missing. These are
accounted for by the statement that
from tbe bursting of shells some of the
crew were blown into the sea, while
others were torn into fragments. One
shot killed eighteen persons. So rapid
and fatal was the firing that the deck of
the Huascar was completely cleared,
and it was difficult to find one to run the
risk of coming up to lower the flag,
four in succession having lost their lives
in the attempt, until it was successfully
accomplished by a negro. It is thought
that $30,000 will make the Huascar fit
for sea and tight again, although her
whole upper works were knocked to
pieces by the Chilian lire.
Uncle Sam's Pensioners.
An abstract is given below of the an
nual report of the lion. J. A. Bentley,
Commissioner of Pensions to the Sec
retary of the Interior:
On the 30th of .June last there were
242, persons in the United States
receiving pensions from the Govern
ment. The pension list is now larger
than at any previous time. The high
est point heretofore reached was in
1873, but the number now reported ex
ceeds the list of that year by 4.344.
The present list is composed as follows:
Army invalid pensioners, 125,158.
Army widows, children and depend
ent relatives, 81,174.
Navy invalids, 1,844.
Navv widows, etc., 1,772.
Surviving soldiers of the War of
1812, 11,621.
Widows of deceased soldiers of the
War of 1812, 2,110.
During the year 31,346 new names
were added to the list; 908 names which
had previously l>ecn dropped from the
rolls, mainly from a failure for three
y«iars to claim their pensions, were re
stored, and 13,4'J7 names were for vari
ous reasons dropped. The aggregate
amount of one year's pension to all
pensioners is $25,493,742.15, but the
actual annual payment exceeds that
sum by several millions of dollars.
Important to Pensioners.
The following circular has been is-
Hued from the Department of the Inte
rior, Pension Office :
To Peru/ion Claimant* and their At
torneys :
To enable this office to dispatch with
better facility the rapidly increasing
current of business, a change in the sys
tem of arranging records and files has
been made, which will render it neces
sary that all inquiries for the condition
of pension claims on account of service
rendered after March 4, 1801, should,
contain the name of the soldier who
performed the military service, with his I
State, company and regiment, as well
as the number of the claim or pension
certificate, as the case may be. Inqui
ries which do not contain the above in
formation will not bo answered, except
in special cases where the failure to fur
nish it is explained.
[Signed] J. A. HKNTLKY,
Commissioner of Pensions.
A NEW POSTAL REGULATION. — A
postal regulation has been in force now
for two months, which is not well
known among business men, or it
would be more generally availed. We
refer to the fact that statements, bills,
etc., can now be mailed in an unsealed
envelope with a one-cent stamp. Thus
the many monthly statements which
are made out by wholesale arid retail
dealers each month can Is: mailed for
one cent, but no writing other than the
legitimate bill can be placed upon tbe
statement. No such words as "please
remit" can Is*, neither can a bill receipt
ed be sent. If it is necessary to have
the words "please remit" on the state
ments or bills, they can l»e printed as
part of the heading. Publishers of
newspapers have the right to enclose
bills for subscription in their papers,
and also receipted bills for the same, but
riot to write the words "please remit,"
which, however, may Is: printed on the
bill without infringing the law.
CONOKESMMAN FEI.TOW, of the 7th
Georgia District, has written a letter
in which be declares bis intention of
not affiliating with the Democrats in
the present session of Congress. It is
rumored also that Congressman Speer,
of the same State, will tuke his stand
by the side of Mr. Felton, and that
Hon. A. 11. Stephens will make an
other Democrat who will no longer
muster with the Bourbons. The late
elections are having an admirable effect
upon the Solid South.
THE Philadelphia Time* is given to
making good suggestions, and the latest
is that our Presidents should issue mes
sages about a foot long, with every
thing boiled down. It would have
turned the tables most effectually on
the parties who stole bis last message
if President Hayes had issued a new
one, in a concise form.
POTTKK county appears to Is: the
model county of tbe State. There were
so few criminal cases for trial at the late
term of court, and they so unimportant,
that it was thought not worth while to
put the county to the expense of bring
ing the jury together and holding court.
By consent of counsel all the cases
were continued until next court.
THE different liverymen in the coun
ties of Mercer, Venango, Lawrence,
Crawford, Butler arid Clarion will meet
in Franklin on the 17th of December,
1870, for the purpose of organizing a
"Liverymen's Union and Protective As
sociation." Thcobjeetof this association
is to form a protection against theft,
cruelty to animals, etc.
We Believe
That if everyone would use Hop Bit
ters freely, there would be much less
sickness and misery in the world; and
people are fast finding this out, whole
families keeping well at a trifling cost
by its use. We advise all to try it.—
U. d- A., Rochester, X. Y.
Here is a Chance to Learn Some
thing.
We have sent for and have on hands
500 copies of the famous SIOO Prize
Essay on the "Cultivation of the Po
tato," by D. H. Crompton. of Wape
county, Pa. The prize was offered by
a gentleman at present a citizen of
Butler, several years ago, and was
competed for by twenty persons. A
committee of three thorough agricul
turists awarded the prize to Mr. C.,
whose essay, with that of the cele
brated French cook, Pierre Blot, on
"How to Cook the Potato," and a few
pages containing illustrations and de
scriptions of the different varieties of
potatoes, have been printed and put
into book form. Thebookcontains forty
pages and is handsomely illustrated
throughout, the copyright alone of one
of the pages containing cuts of all the
insects which are enemies of the
potato, costing the publishers fifteen
dollars. We will send this book by
mail to any person sending us the price,
25 cents. " W. C. NEULKV,
But'er, Pa.
Boef Hides.
Wm. Mardorf is paying from 7 to 9
cents per pound for good Beef Hides.
Charles Gardner,
Of 19 Federal street, Allegheny City,
desires to inform our readers that he
will make to order suits of the most
fashionable cuts at lower prices than
any other Merchant Tailor west of the
mountains.
Wheat! Wheat!
The highest Pittsburgh market price
paid for Wheat, at Walter Boos'
Mill, Butler, Pa. WALTER Boos.
It is a Pleasure
For us to call tbe attention of our read
ers to tbe fact, that they cannot find a
better establishment to order their
Winter Clothing from, than H. 11.
Niemann's, 101 Smithfield street,
Pittsburgh.
• —« m
Uje! Rye!
10,000 bushels of Rye wanted at
Walter <fc Boos' Mill, to be ground
into flour. 75 cents paid per bushel.
WALTER A Boos.
Hide Market.
S. Schambcrg, butcher, pays the
best price for Beef Hides, Skins and
Pelts in Butler.
A Farmer's Paper.
We ask attention to the card r THE OHIO
FA KMKL:, of Cleveland, Ohio, in this issue of
otir paiier, and recommend it AN one of the old
est and most valuable agricultural and family
PAPERS of the country.
CANCER.
This disease like many others is regarded
AS incurable. IT is not so. If it is taken in
time it is as easily cured as a wart or a corn.
We know very well that it is a fearful disease
ami will eat away until it destroys life, that
is if it is negleeted, but if it is attended to
when it first makes its appearance, or soon
after, there is no trouble in eradicating it
from the system. Persons will have to be here
during part of the treatment, consequently
there is no use writing to me for information
whether it can be cured without my seeing the
case. I also treat with success, Rupture, I'iles,
Fistula, Ulcers, Ulcerated legs, Varicose Veins,
Varicocele Tumors, Hydrocele, and every form
of Hkin Disease.
Or. Keyuer, 240 Penrt Aveme,
OPPOSITE Christ's Church, Pittsburgh, Pa.
Jtutler UlurkcU.
UcrTEo- -Good 22 cent* V tti.
Ll*'•/>."» -Plain sugar cured bams 11 jts. HI IT»;
shoulders, 8 : sides, 8
BEAKS —White, tI.ZVSiI 50 T> bush.
CitlCKESe —2s to 30 cts. per pair.
CILKESE—IB Ct» V It).
Cons MM;.— 2 cis. V lb.
CAI.V SKISS 9OC/FOTL T! lb.
Eoon —2o cts I'o/.en.
PIY.TM-Wheat, TC(S;B * bbl, sack |125»F2 ;
bnekwheat. *2.50 V EST.
OKA iff — Oats, 32 cts V bushel : corn 45 ; wheat
%1 <5 : rye 7-'< cents : buckwheat, 00.
Ito'SKY 2'L cts. V lb.
LARK -7c V IT'. Tallow, >\rw 7.
LEATHER -Bole 'IVWA cts. V lb.; upper *2.50
GTIV-I a side : kip OOCO.'FOC V lb.
MOLUIKM—WMS-OOC V gallon. Syrup, 50 <U 800
OSLO**—T! V bush.
POTATOES —4 ><:. f* blshel.
Ht;o/.lt-Yellow ; whits D'FE'lOc. V lb.
HALT— No. 1. *lB5 V barrel.
MABBIACIEiI.
MA ILK HART ("A I.Kit Nov. 20th LH7!I, by
HUM. WatU-rson, Mr. Ocorge Markhart, or
Butler county, and Mis* Jennie Caler, of Heaver
couuty.
■IRATHM.
ISRITTAIN- Dec. 3, 1871), In iSutler, Areliy
Wallace llriltain, aged 0 years and 8 months.
HKIUVIL K March, 1S7!», at West Monterey,
Clarion county, Pa., Mr. William T. Hedwicfc,
aged about 70 years.
New Advertisement*.
Worth jffulual.
The nnnuiil NI'I llng of the meiiilx rs ol the
Worth Mutunl Fire 1 n»u rauce COM panv will Is;
held In the 8choolhou»e ut West Liberty, on
the second Haturrh.y of Juitinry, 18SO, bring
the 10th day. J. M. MAKBIIAI.L,
deelOtd Secretary.
A| QC PER copy, when ssrit in cluba of 20, is
the ptilM of the I'LLLL.ALJKM'LLFA WKKK-
L.R TNU, one year, to any address,
AI CA per copy, when rent in clubs of 10, U
SA<UU the price of the PHILADELPHIA WEEK
LY TIMES, one year, to any address.
AA per copy to single subscril>erß. Is the price
s<6 of the i'IFII.AI>r.I.I-UIA WEEKLY TIMES, one
year, to any addrees.
WFor Six Dollars we will send three copies of
the PHILADELPHIA WEEKLY TIMES one year,
to any address, oostage fr«E, and give tho per
son sending ris tlin mousy a copy of the A&HALM
or ME WAII, a beautifully illustrated volume of
H(>o pages, the retail price of which is four
dollars.
WF. UNIIKHITATINOKY OK AIM FOIt THE
PHILADELPHIA
WEEKLY TIMES
That it ia the LAiuiKnr, the CHEAPEST and the
IIKHT family Journal piibhsho<l. Write LO us for
A specimen copy and JMLGE for yourself. In
iU columns the reader will And ALL THE NEWS,
ample variety of editorial, |«>etry, liteiary ai ti
des, stories and sketches, tales of travel, fash
ion gossip, interviews with prominent men,
financial reports, dramatic criticism religious
tidings, agricultural and domestic article*, and
every other fnature that ean nikke a paper valu
able. The miscellany of rpirit"d writers, cov
ering every variety and range of subject and
thought will be maintained as of old by contrib
utors who stand at the head of their speeisltioe.
A special feature will BO tbe continuation of
the ''ASWALS OR MT WA«," graphically written
by soldmrs, North aud Hontb, descriptive of
Mcimea and events In which they took an active
part, one chapter of which will appear IN each
number. These AHNAIX have |>roved so valuable
that the bound volume containing their first
series has found an Immense sale.
TKILMH—I/NK YK\H :
O*E COPY $2 I TEX Oopttat 916
FIVE COPIES »8 | TWEWTY C0P1E5..126
A* EXIHA COPY PIIEE TO THE OETrEtt IIP of A U.VU.
THK TIMKH,
TIMES nvitmvo, PHILADELPHIA-
Election Notice.
An election tor twelve Directors of the But
ler Mutual Fire Insurance Company, to serve
; tor the ensuing y- ir, will b ■ held at the ofllce
of the- Bocr<-: >rv, in Hutler, Pa., on the second
Tuesday of January, ISSO, beine the l»th day
of the mouth, betwe 11 the hours of 1 and 2
P.M. H 0. HF.tNF.MAN,
declO Secietarv.
Dissolution Notice,
Notice is Lereby given that on the 34th day
of November, IS7B. the firm of Miller Bros ,
cursed in the Furniture business in the bor
ough or Butler, was dissolved by mutual con
sent, J. U. Miller tetiriug. The bu»iuc--s will
hereafter be carried on under the firm name ot
Miller Bros. & Co.. with whom the books ol
the late firm have been left for settlement.
J. MILLER,
J. 11. MILLER,
G. P. MILLER,
declO-Ct I MILLER.
CL'T IT our FOP. REFSREN'O'E —
When yju want to buy
00000000000
".DOLM&.NS !°
00000000000
L - AN D
,'JAGE ETS!:
W.., ire otr rill -pcclal Price* iu all the lut
c 1 rstgm. .nivinjr Inuiht a manufacture.B
line ot I a! tern Uai in* nt <ut a aacriUco.
WIIEV YOU WANT
BEAR 111 in n I we are selling I-nported
Camels HairCl -'h, worth »7|,£c at 20c.
I.upine Color.wl ashm -res, full range of
color*, at L>c. 1. 11 pine Merinos at B'-c.
Sal n Finlslieil I'.lack Cashmeres at 6>c,750.
MJcaii i #I.OO. New Designs in
tSTNovelty Dress Goods.®
Away under early prices.
At prlcei t > in e -ej*. elo e buyers.
HEABD, BIBSR & EASTON,
105 MARKET STREET,
lielwce 'ill Ave. ami Liberty St.,
PITTSBURGH, PA.
1880.
Harper's Ba/ar.
ILLUSTRATED.
Tills popular peri'idical is pre-eminently a
Journal for the household.
Every Number furnishes the latest informa
tion in regai'l to Fashions iu dress and orna
ment. the newest and rr.ost approved patterns,
with descriptive articles derived from authentic
and original sources ; while its Stories, Poems,
arid Essays on Bocial and Domestic Topics, give
variety to IU columns.
The Volumes of the IIAZAR begin with the first
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Harper's Periodicals.
HARPER'S MAGAZINE, One Year W 00
HARPER 8 WEEKLY, •• " 400
HARPER'S IJAZ YR, " " 4CO
The THREE above named publications.
One Year 1" CO
Anv TWO above named. One Year 7 00
HARPER'B YOUNO PEOPLE; One Year.. 1 50
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Address nARPER A BROTHERS,
Now York.
1880.
Harper'* You 11 it People.
ILLUSTRATED.
The evils of sensational literature for the
vonng are well known, and the want of au anti
dote has long been felt. This w suj niied by
HAMPER'S Vonno PEOPLE, a beautifully illns-
Hated weekly journal, which is equally devoid
of the objectionable features of sensational
Juvenile literature mid of that morah/jng tone
which repels tho youthful reader.
The Volumes of the Yoono I'Kopi.E begin
with the firist Number, publish'd in November
of each year. When no lime is mentioned, it
will bo understood that tho suliscriber wishes to
commence with the Number next afler tlio re
ceipt of order.
Harpor'a Periodicals.
HARPER'S MAGAZINE, One Year ..$4 00
HARPER'S WEEKLY, " » * 00
HARPERS BAZAR, «' " * 00
The THREE above named publications,
One Year 10 00
Any TWO above named. One Ynar 7 00
HARPER'S YOUNO PEOPLE, One Year. 1 50
Postage Free to all subscribers in the
United Stales or Canada.
Inducements for 1880 Only.
Thirteen Numbers of HARPER'S Yotrso
PEOPLE will be furnished to every yearly sub
scriber to HAULER'S WEEKLY for 1880 ; or, HAR
PER'S Yoimo PEOPLE and HARPER'S WEEKLY will
lie sent to any address for one year, commen
cing with tbe first Number of HARPER'S WEEKLY
for January, 1880, on receipt of $5 00 for the
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A BROTHERS.
Address H ARPER A BROTHERS,
New York.
1 HMO.
Harpep's Weelcly.
ILLUSTRATED.
This periodical has always, by Its able and
scholarly discussions of the questions of the
day, as wsll as by Its 111uslrations—which are
prepared by tbe l>est. at lists -exerted a most
isiwerful and beneficial Influence upon the pub
lic mind.
Tho weight of Its Influence will always be
found on the side of morality, enlightenment,
arid refinement.
Tbe Volumes of tbe WEEKLY begin with the
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the subscriber wishes to commence with the
Nnmlier next after tbe receipt of order.
Ilarpor's Periodicals.
HARPER'S MAGAZINE, One Year tt (Kl
HARPERS WEEKLY, " " * OO
HARPER'S BA/AR, " " 4 0"
The THREE abive named publications,
One Year 10 'KI
Any TWO als»v« i.amed, One Year 7 00
HARPER'S YOUNG PEOPLE, One Year 100
CoT Postage Free to all suliscriliers iu the
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ags paid, or by exprnss, frse of ex|>eiiso (pro
vided tbe freight does not exceed one dollar p«r
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prising Tw-nty-thren Volumes, snnt on receint
of cash at the rate of »f> 25 per volume, freight
at expense of purchaser.
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A I'ROtHKIIS. 1
Address HAltl'Eß A BROTHERS,
Slew York. I
J. & G. F. KECK,
MERCHANT TAILOBS,
-i-'-L wa&kk'A", - A._ ** *.' '_*"m, m me..
jn Have Just Received and Keep Constantly on Hand all the
LATEST STYLES OIF"
||Pff FottifP. P'om^atie
iPlil If «| Which they are making up to order in the latest styles and
tPia '1 11 best workmanlike manner, at the most reasonable prices. All
NHll 1 R work guaranteed to give satisfaction.
H n Jli ;Li 8-^**Remember the place.
J. A G. F. KECK. Main St., ISuiler, Fa.
1880,
Harper's Magazine.
ILLUSTRATED.
"3tallying the subject objectively and from
the educational point of view—seeking to pro
vide that which, taken altogejhej, will be of the
moot service to the largest number—l long ago
concluded that, if I could have but one work for
a library, I would select a complete set of Har
per's Monthly.—Charles Francis Adams, Jr. '
Its contents are contributed by the most em
inent authors and artieU of Europe and Ameri
ca, while the long experience of its publishers
has mwle thorn thoroughly njuversant with the
desires of the public, which they will spare no
effort to gratify.
The volume* of the Magazine begin with the
Numbers for June and December of each year.
When no time is specified, it will be understood
that the subscriber wishes to bog in with the cur
rent Number-
Harper's Periodicals.
HARPER S MAGAZINE, One Year *4 00
HARPER'S WEEKLY, " " 4 00
HARPER'S BAZAR, " " 4 00
The THREE above named publications.
One Yenr 10 00
Any TWO above named. One Year 7 00
HARPER'S YOUNG PEOPLE, One Year . 1 50
C-'jf Postage Free *o all subscribers in the
United States or Canada.
A Complete Set of Harper's Magazine, com-
E rising 5a Volumes, in neat cloth binling, will
e sent by express, freight at expense of pur
chaser, on recoipt of *2 25 per volume. Single
volumes, by mail, postpaid, £3 00. Cloth cases,
for binding, 38 cents, by mail, postpaid.
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tisement without the express order or Harper
& Broth K.rs.
Address HARPER A BROTHERS.
New York.
Every One That Cultivates the Soil
feHOULD COMPARE TUB ORIGINAL, INDB-
I'ENDKNJ% CONSCIENTIOUS
Rural New-Yorker
with other papers.
THE FIRST HORTICULTURAL A>n AGRI
CULTURAL AUTHORITY in AMERICA.
Ac Illustrated Weekly for all Parts o! Our
Country.
NUBHCRIBE NOW!
ifar-A II Paper for II per Annum. No Club
R:ltC.S..^»
The Rural IN the disseminator of Mounts'
While Prolific Corn. Beauty of Hebron Potato,
Pearl Millet, and Fifty sorts ol new and rare
vegetable and flower <-»;edd.
igrrtic present Froe Seed and Plant Distribu
tion Is the most costly und valuable ever be
fore offered by any Journal In the World.
A Full illu-urated dcscriutivc a,rcout t of It
will tasent with Spe-lmen Copy Fhrk to ap
plicant*, that all may judge lor thfinselves.
Illustrations froui Life. No untrustworthy
advertisements. All new farm and garden
plants or seeds t-sted, and impirtlally reportel
upon. When the size and quality of the papei,
the standing of Ls world-ienowned eontiibu
tors, Its Independence and trustworthiness, lit
Free Seed and Plant Distributions (wlilch are
deemed by subscribers as of more value each
year tli.iu the subscription price) are cou.ld
i red, It is bv far the
CHEAPEST C 'UNTKY-HOME JOURNAL
IN THE WORLD!
Experiment Grounds of 8J Aires Owned by
The Rural New Yorker mid VVoikcd in the
Interests of Its Subscribers.
It will help you mike money and spend it
judiciously.
Prop. W. J. Krai., of the Michigan Agtleul
tural College: "The Rural New-Yorker is now
the best paper."
PltOF. E. M. Phbi.Ton, of the Kansas Agri
cultural College: "flu Rural New-Yorker Ins
inor" influence and is more quoted than all thu
re» t put ton other "
Prbh T. T. Lyi-h : "Tne Riral is the bent
paper 1 see."
A paper for the Counlry, Village. City ; for
the market gardener, niirnryftan, Mult grower,
small fruit culturlrt, herdsman. dairyman, apia
rian, the selciitl-t, ever) where. No sectional
prejudices.
The most vigorous uml able combination of
practical wi Iters ever tel »re collected together
in the columns «>f anv journal ORIGINAL
tists, ol fruits, nr. Idled ure, farm helps, shrubs,
freer, -gilcultural implements, etc.
£%"fiu;hur|a*m tli'miiliout the Country.
iff Ul.tiUl C'lin-r aulatorv Letters.
Thiid Year ol Its Present Management, 31st
Year ol lis Age
Published week'v. Addie-s
RURAL NEW-ToRKEK,
78 Duane St, N. Y.
Tub GREATEST LIVING AUTHORS, such
as Prop. Max Miili.bk, llt. How. W. EWlai>
■TONE. Jas. A. Fkoijob, I'kok lluxi.Kr. R. A.
Proctor, Row. A FUR.r.viAN, Prop. Ttkhall,
DK. W. C. Carpenter, Frances Powbr Conn,
ina Duke or AMIRU„ IV*. Black, *'ii>»
Tiiackbray, Mrs. Miiuk-'H CaitK, Geohhb
MacDonai.d, Mrs. Oliphamt, Jean Inobi.ow,
Mrs Alexanokr, Titos. Hauut, Mattiiiw
Arnold, LUNAR Kinoslet, W. W. htokkt,
Tcrocknikp, Carltlb, Rusrin, Tbumtson,
Brow*im», and many others, are represented
In the pages of
Littell's Living Age.
lu 18H0, Til* Liviho Afi« itnlcrs upon Its
37th year, admittedly unrivalled and continu
ously successful. During the year It will fur
nish to Its readers th'i production* of the mo.t
ctnlienl authors above named and many others ;
embracing the choicest Serial and Short Stories
by the Leading Foreign Novelists, and mi
amount
UNA I'PROACIIED BY ANY
OTHER PERIODICAL
In the worl<l, of iho most valuable Literary and
Scientific matter of the d ty, Iroin the pens i>r
the foremost Essayists. Scientists, Clitic*. Dis
coverer* and Editors, representing every de
partment. of Knowledge and Pro.Teas.
The Liviho Aor Is a weekly magaxlne giv
ing more than
THREE AND A QUARTER THOUSAND
double-column octavo page* ol reading matter
yearly. It presents In uii Inexpensive form,
considering Its great, amount ol matter, with
freshness, owing to Its w ekly Issue, and with
a satisfactory completeness attempted by no
other publication, the best Essays, Reviews,
Criticisms, Tale. Sk-tchcs ol Tiavel and Dls
covcy, Poetry, Scientific, Biographical' lllitori
cat and Pallilcal inlonnatloii, Iroio tho entire
body of Foreign Periodica! Literature.
Tho Importance of I lie Livinii Auk to every
American reader, as tSe only satisfactorily Iresh
anil COMPLETE compilation of an Indispen
sable current literature,—lndispensable because
it unbraces the productions of the
ABLEST LIVINU WRITERS,
Is sufficiently Indlra'ed by the following
( >|»ini<»iH x
"It covers the whole field ol literature, and
covers It complexly, thoroughly and Impar
llolly."—Tlines, Clnclniiatl.
"It affords the best, the cheapest and most
convenient means of keeping abreast Willi the
progress ol thought In all Its phases."—North
Aincilcati, Phlladelphl i
"It I", by all odds, the best eclectic publish
ed."Houtlierti Churchman, Richmond.
"Gives the l>est of all at the price of one."—
New Yolk Independent.
"The prince among magar.lnes."—New York
Observer.
"It so fully supplies the wants of I lie reading
public that through Us pagrs alone It Is possi
ble to be as thoroughly well Informed lu cur
rent lltcraluio OS l.y the perusal of a long list
of monthlies."— Philadelphia Inquirer.
"To rend It weekly is a III* ral education."—
Zlou's Herald, Boston.
"Willi It alone a reader may lalrly keep up
with all that Is Important In Hie literature, |,|«.
Tory, politics and science of the day."—The
Methodist, New York
"It holds the palm against all rivals." Com
mercial, Louisville.
"It Is Indispensable to every one who desires
a thorough compendium of all that Is admira
ble and noteworthy lu the literary world."—
Boston Post.
"There Is no other way of procuring the same
amount ol excellent literature lor snythlng like
the same price."—Boston Advertiser.
"The best literature of tho dsy.' New Yolk
Timet,
Fublishcd WEEKLY at a year, free of poet
age.
tJ-EXTRA OFFER FOR ISSO.
To all new nibFeribt-rs lor 1880 will b« sent
gratis those numbers <>f 13711 which contain,
besides ether interesting iu:il?er, the liret chap
ters of "He WHO WILL \UT WHEN HE MAY," a
new btor. I>v MRS. OLJPUANT, uow appear
ing in The Living Age ftona advance sheets.
CLUB PRICES FOR THE BEST HOME
AND FOREIGN LITERATURE.
[•'Possessed of The Living Aire and or
other of our vivacious A OUT lean motilities, a
subscriber will find hiuiscll iu command of the
whole situation."—Phila. Even'g Bulletin.)
For #10.50 The Living Age and eilhc one of
thu American S4 Mouthlies (or Haryer's Week
ly or Bazar* will be sent lor a year, both post
paid ; or, for f0.50 The Living Age and the St.
Nicholas, or Appleton's .'uurn.il.
Address, LITTELL & CO., Boston.
Notice to Creditors.
In the matter of the assignment of D McDon
ald for the benoSt of creditors. C. P. 373,
June Term. 1876.
Petition of I. N. Graham, Assignee, for leave to
reconvey. Ac., and to lie discharged.
Now, Dec. 1, 1879, ordered that notica be
given to creditors of said and other
partios interested, by publicatisn for two suc
cessive weeks in ai least one newspapnr pub
lished in the b irough of Dutlkr; that the prayer
of tho foregoiuK p' titiou will bo granted, and
decree made a* prayed for unless objections
thereto are filed on or before the 13th iust.
H* TIIE COURT.
dec3-2t A, RUSSELL, Proth'y.
HO LID AT
CP THS MOST BEAUTim DESIGNS, AT
k B. Reed I Co.':
93 MARKET ST^^"
Pittsburgh,?^
EVERY
DESCRIPTION.
Alto, a very fine selection of
*PIAMQITDS*
Of the first water, hand"
«omly mounted.
* Ladies'and Seats' Sold
and Silver Stem
A Complete
Aiiortment of tfrv
SOLID SlLVEßij^>^
SILVER PLATED WARE
Gold &. Silver Headed Canes
on ?ik,?°o r^Jo o . rq n UO d">fu P bT?,"l
great variety.
Card Bajketi", Flower Stands, Marble and
Bronze Clocks,
BRONZE AND MARBLE
STATTJ ART
Solid Silver and Silver Plated
Knivos, Forks and Spoons.
Valuable Town Property
FOR MALE.
The under signed wishes to sell tho following
described property in the borough of Butler,
Boiler eountr; Pa :
TWO LOTH, 20 feet front each, and running
back 10 ) feet, located on Main street, adjoining
the Rocltonatein property.
MIX LOTS fronting on Cunningham street,
20 feet each iu front and luuiiiug l>wl. 120 r»ot.
I will also sell the BRICK and FRAME build
ings erec!o.J on port of the same property from
wldcli the above lots are taken, together with
the ground on which Uiny stand.
Also —FIVE ACHES within tho borough of
Duller, on tho old Mercer road, originally owned
bv James M. R.odin, Esq.
AIso—FORTY ACRE-* of c.ial land in Wash
ington township, originally owned by Patrick
O'Conner, and near to tho Hhonango Railroad
depot.
K-yFor terms apply to tho undersigned, living
in Butler. PATRICK KELLY.
detiMt
(formerly I>r. CuOu'i Khtiisy Pure )
A V«*K«*lubln Jiri'purnt; HI ntt<| MM* oaalr •urn
ri*m» il,r in tno W»rl«J for Ift ll^citac.
iefa«l Alit Lhcr, ttllfl
l i litjit r
if imoiii I!M of Ui»* li Illicit order Iu proof
Of tllW'M n('«tl>IIM a lll ».
«•« For 111* cut" <-r i, mil for Wnt
nrr's 4
vos (h* CHIT ' r iiiitft.i'i ht.'i tii* other
•lIWUn'H, cull fur Uurtarr'4 Hui< lAJ«Jsa«*jr
and Llvprl'iiri*.
WARMERS SAFE B'TTERS.
It IN INarf rt«e*. nnd ■»! itiu l(at«*n
#vrry fiiiicMoii It; it»nr -I • nifhftil ucltOli, land
In Itin«a a iM'iiHflt Kt ulI itlnna •« i.
It r ur* i I «IIhIMI«I iti»n « iln-r Wfilaa Krt»t»-
tti.aaft uti'l tllCluw.lJtf CiaiactN, I I
wrn, ft lift f»f !.*»»• Horn,
IVcithfirrsof»Jif
Cotaullpaalloia. 'J.m rnl l.«l»ll
llr,' fi\. Nt" v j.wO by lli«« ■»>•;«• >()•(«<••«. It u
Illicit I*l*l Ml All f»H.I fj.HiHt laifilr.
llottlfu of two
WARNER S SAFE NERVINE
Qul'-fclv «ivf* Ili-it itml Mrr|i totliominVuliiff,
« ur• i llriaaliM lM* mii'l Ni iu ial;;ln. privwitii
lifVi'i Nrrvom l*a'*>H
i xffMiv" ilrmU, ovar
ii tiitln n a til Nootlio «1l»-
r lM)urf«i tlio «y«t« in,
jr lurM**
Icmk, DOc. nla*l fI.OO.
IAFE PILLS
•ir*l|v(* NtlintiliiN for A I
ROC n fsTEiSCTh. T.
l^ - | f»,r fumpliM
Administrator's Sale.
By virtue of an order and deer en of the Or
phans' <!ourt or lluller county, to me directed,
I will offnr for snle at public outcry on the prem
ise*, In WlndiiM township, Butler eounly, oil
Friday, Dec. 261h, 1879,
the farm lately owned by John Pout, dne'd, con
taining one hundred and sli a>-res. morn or l"s*.
honmle'l north by August Acre et al., east br
Oalbreath, suntli l>v Thomas lln-Uett et al. and
WXRI l>y Caspnr Frt-ehug ; mostly aloared and
iiniier eullWatlim t dwelling house, barn and
other outbuildings tliernon.
TKIIMH One-third In hand on confirmation
of sale, and tho rnmalnder In two eijnal annual
Instalments, with lawful internet, to be securnd
by bond and mortgagn.
(' \HPEII FREELINO,
4l*<;.'l 41 Admlnlntralor.
Wlili * wmik iu your own town. Tnrrns ami ♦#
9"" outfit free. Address 11. llal.i.MT A Co.,
I'ortland, Maine. deus-ly
NEW GOODS!
—AT—
Schneideman's,
Next door to Saving* Bank,
Butler, ]?a.
I MHE: MAN THAT GOES EAST US
HAS RETURNED, A.ND HAS NOW ON EXHIBITION THE LARGEST AND BEST ASSORTED STOCK OF Q* - 2- |
OVERCOATS, FINE SUITS, BUSINESS SUITS, YOUTHS' SUITS, BOYS' SUITS, CHILDREN'S SUITS, " } | ?
in fact SUITS suitable for each and every one that is in want of a Suit. Also a very full line of r P H— <
FURNISHING GOODS, TRUNKS, VALISES, Ac., «" bought in the East by Mr. Schr.eideman in person, and will be sold at less than any Competitor can now buy them. r 2
H. BCHNEIDEMAN. ? or ™

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