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Butler citizen. [volume] (Butler, Pa.) 1877-1922, April 18, 1890, Image 2

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375 CITIZEN.
#, C. 9MILKT - - - PROPRIETOR
BUBSCJUfTIOiI' BATM--POSTAGE PRKrAID :
One yea*. Inside Coonty »!•»
One Tea*, OntsMe County * 2 -°°
Payable in Advance.
tater*4 at PoatoSc* at Batler ai 2d class matter
FRIDAY, APRIL 18.1990.
OC iff* issue ot the Cm® some extra copies
Ml mated which are sent to citizens ot the
rnnutj ~V are not subscriber* and their sub
nub us a favor by sending us
the names ot their neighbors, not now taking a
county paper.
S^oFtEfwriter, not for publication but as
beaooom
jnn'r* by a responsible name.
The Republican Canvass.
The Republican people and press of this
State are just now engaged in an open con
sideration of th# party situation and of the
candidates in the field for the Guber
natorial nomination. It is a very whole
some thing. If it is carried on with the
single purpose of bringing out the real
party sentiment and allowing it to be so
shaped as to obtain the best results, the
discussion must prove most beneficial.
There is need, however, of the utmost fair
ness and entire absence of acrimony if any
good is to follow.
The Republican party is entitled to, and
doubtless will, make its own nomination
reunite to follow are of a very important
character, and the supremacy of the party
whose principles were so unmistakably ap
proved by the people at the last Presiden
tial election is not to be put in peril by
subversion of the will of the Republican
masses or any interference with the free
action of the party in roakine its choice of
candidates. "We do not believe there is
any such purpose. Leaders, and thone in
influential party position, will hare their
preferences, doubtless, but these will be
accepted by the party as they are wise or
rejected as they are unwise.
There are several announced candidates
for the Republican nomination for Gover
nor, and until recently very little interest
was manifested in the drift of the canvass.
Within the past few days that has changed.
The whole field is now under review, and
this is the time for it. There are great
apprehensions in some quarters of party
disturbance and party peril. We cannot
olose our eyes to this fact. If these appre
hensions are real this is the time to inquire
into their cause. We cannot afford to
▼ait until after the Convention, when it
■will be too late to remedy mistakes. This
ia what the present general Tliscussion of
the situation means.
The place to settle Eepublican diffi
culties is inside the Republican party.
This has not always been done, but when
we have failed it has been at such a sacri
fice that the lesson has proved impressive,
and no one can now be unmindful of it.
Ko man's interests, whatever they are,
should be allowed to stand in the way of
the always greater and broader interests of
the Republican party, which are also the
interests of the people at large. The man
who is nominated for Governor this year
must be one who can command the confi
dence and support of the Republican
voters, there will then be no fear of the
result Tne name of the candidate will be
of no consequence so long as the man is
the choice of the party itself.
Por that reason there should be the
widest and freest discussion ef candidates
previous to the Convention. That is now
in progress. Conducted in a spirit of fair
ness and unselfishness, as it ought to be,
no candidate who is fit to bear the standard
of the Republican party will fear to have
the strongest light turned upon his record
and character.— Philadelphia Press.
Ik the flooded districts of Louisiana
the buffalo gnats which swarm in vast num
bers, are killing the stock with their stings.
They soon sting to death an unprotected
horse or mule. Even men have fallen
victims to their bites, the bodies turning
almost black from the effects of the many
thousands of stings. Several persons wore
killed by them in 1883 and 1884.
Two hundred farms in Xew Jersey have
been sold at Sheriff's sale owing to the
Supreme Court's decision that township
tax titles are invalid. The occnpauts of
the farms are heart broken at having the
savings and labor of years taken from
them.
The State Canvass
A recent dispatch from Washington,
■aid:
The recent visit of State Chairman An
drews to Washington has developed a
suspicion that a new program has been
agreed upon in regard to the Guberna
torial canvass in Pennsylvania, namelv:
that the slaughtering of Delamater is to be
done by the Chairman, while Quay keeps
his hands out of the matter. It would be
just as effective to have Andrews show
a marked indifference to Delamatcr's suc
cess as to have Senator Quay pronounce
against him, while it would relieve Quay
of the charge of having been forced by
public sentiment to abandon a candidate
whom he allowed to be understood was
his particular choice as a successor to
Governor Beaver.
Uuder the caption, "Senator Delama
ter," the Philadelphia Press, in a leading
editorial, publishes the charges made by
•x-Benator Emery in his Bradford speech,
and says:
"We are not prepared to believe that
such charges can successfully stand against
Senator Delamater. He is a young man of
ooncededly high ability and honorable
ambition and at this time a leading candi
dale fun lUt> UuuubUcau uumluaUnu fut
Governor of the State. He cannot afford
to remain silent under accusations such as
these and coming with the emphasiti and
from the source that these do.
"Senator Delamater owes it not merely
to himself, but to the Republican party,
whose candidate for the great office ol
Governor he expects to be, to meet these
charges fully and completely and so stran
gle them that there shall never again be a
chance for anybody either inside or out
side the party to use them. This is due
the Republican people, who are now_ in
possession of but one side of the story, and
who may wrongly construe absolute si
lence. Delay or failure to make convinc
ing answer cannot but prove unfortunate.
"The Press makes this request of Sena
tor Delamater in behalf of the Repub
licans of the State. It has taken no sides
in the canvass for the Gubernatorial nomi
nation; its candidate for Governor will be
the nominee of the convention. The
party requires, howei'Cr, that the nominee,
whosoever he may be, shall be one against
whose character no charges can be suc
cessfully made. Senator Delamater can
doubtless refute ex-Senator Emery's allega
tions, and he ought to satisfy the whole
Republican party of that fact. They
are of too serious a nature to go un
answered."
IT is not safe for the Republicans to
count upon an cany victory this year. The
State ticket must be selected wisely and
with practical unaminity, and the local
tickets mast be made up of men unexcept
ionable in character and must bo support
ed with unwavering loyalty by all Kcpnb
licans. This is no year for the exhibition
of personal jealousies or the assertion of
unwarranted personal ambitions. Bond
the men of experience to the front, the
men with cool heads and willing hands
for counsel and work, and above all place
no reliance on predictions of Democratic
dissensions, at least until after the conven
tion.—Kittanning Pr<w.
Samuel J. Randall.
Mr. Randall, who died after along and
painful illness at his homo in "Washington
yesterday morning, entered Congress in
the year 1*63 and has served continuously
since then. He was born in IS2*. and
was therefore but sixty-two year old at
his death.
He was a mr.n of great courage, un
common force of character, ot sterliuf.'
honesty, and with deiinite and clearly eou
ceived purposes in h'- public lite and re
markable executive ability. The:-e quali
ties enabled him to make a conspicuous
career in the House.
He was not in the common sense a
partv man, though he was always a
Democrat. At the beginning of the war
ho enlisted and served as a private soldier,
and was all through the war a war Demo
crat. He was elected to Congress while
still a private soldier in the field.
lie soon became conspicuous in the
House, where he asserted his own opin
ions and found adherents for the policy he
believed to be the best.
Mr. Randall was a man of the type of
Andrew Jackson. Like Jackson he was
not a broad man, but in his own field and
range he was master of his work, and im-
Sressed his own individuality upon all he
id and caused to be done. It is not too
much to say that, coming to the head of
tho Appropriations Committee at the time
he did. there was not another man in
either party who could have forced forward
the necessary work of reform in the public
expenditures as he did. It required the
indomitable will, the persistent force and
the great power of continuous labor which
he alone had to bring the country back
from the looseness of war expenditures to
a peace establishment Later contro
versies have caused his estimable services
in this particular to be somewhat for
gotten; but, after all, it was what he then
heiran and later continued which gave
lie.
Of bis difference with his party in later
times on the tariff and other questions it
is not row necessary to speak. fJe had bis
own views ou these questions, anil it wu
inevitable that he should stand by them at
all hazzards. What he believed right he
did, and was not to be moved from it.
He would rather be beaten than submit, and
to use a common saying, "If he could not
make a spoon he cor Id always spoil a horn.
It remains to be said of hiin that he was
a thorough American —one of the " plain
people," whom Mr. Lincoln loved; true to
his country, true to the people, simple in
his tastes and habits, honest and sincere.
It was his pride to live in a small house in
one of the obscurer parts of Washington,
and on a street which, though he was
Speaker and Chairman of Appropriations
during many vears. was among the last
streets of the'eity to he decently paved, be
cause he would not have it said that be
used his great power to benefit himself. I?
would be a good thing for the country if
more of our public men were of like spirit
with him. —A. 1. Herald of Monday.
THE Standard Oil Company is a great
affair and no mistake. According to Mr.
Rockefeller, the company at the present
time manufactures 3,500,000 gallons ol
crude petroleum into different products
per day. Two thirds of these products, of
the value of $55,000,000 are exported.
The company employs in its business a
force of about 25,000 men.
Quay and Fitler.
A dispatch f.om Philadelphia, dated last
Friday, said: Senator yuay left this city
to-day much troubled in spirit and with
gloomy thoughts of the Delamater can
vass. To-night his forces are shattered,
and if Delamater is to obtain any delegates
at all in Philadelphia he will have to fight
as he never fought before to get them.
Mayor Fitler and Senator Quay held
their final conference to-day. It lasted
two hours, and when Senator Quay left the
Mayor's house, he was in an ugly frame of
mind. So angry was he that he declined
to see his most intimate friends, and he
hastily bundled np his traps and-disappear
ed.
Quay failed to move the Mayor in his
allegiance to Hastings. Filler called upon
Quay to heed the warning on all sides and
not provoke the threatened revolt by
forcing Delamater on the ticket. The
Senator tried to evade the issue by saying
that Delamater had made his own
fight and that he coald not take him out.
His Honor replied that he would do every
thing in his power to send a solid dclega
tion from Philadelphia to the State Con
vention for Hastings.
The Mayor next sent for Charles A. Por
ter, Chairman of the Republican City Com
mittee, and told him his ultimatum. I'or
ter has always been one of Quay's trusted
lieutenants and shares honors with Collec
tor of Internal Revenue Martin in bossing
the Quay machine in Philadelphia. When
Porter left the Mayor he proceeded to the
Quay headquarters and seut a cold shiver
down the backs of the Quay crowd by an
nouncing:
"Gentleman, 1 am for Hastings, and as I
have pledged myself to tbo Mayor, 1 will
do all I can to elect Hastings delegates."
This is the first serious break in the Quay
ranks, and when Senator Delamater was
subsequently informed of Porter having
turned in with the Mayor he said:
"I will win without Philadelphia."
But nevertheless Delamater was as much
aunoyed as 4uay at Potter's defection.
The situation no» looks as if Bastings
will get from 25 to 30 delegates out of the
39 to which Philadelphia is entitled, and
perhaps more.
Senator Quay felt confident last night
that he would succeed in pilling tue
Mayor away from Hastings, but he missed
it. He found Fitler a more stubborn man
than he calculated and he lost.
There is no doubt now that the Mayor
will order a tight all along the line. It is
predicted that Collector Martin, who is
still standing by Quay, will make only a
half-hearted tight against Kitler because he
owes much to the Mayor.
When James McMunes was informed of
the Mayor's coup to-night he said he failed
to see where Delamater would even make
a respectable showing at the Philadelphia
primaries. It is reported that ex-Governor
Hoyt is ready to join the Independents if
Delamater is nominated.
IT was Tom Corwin who said that "the
only thing beyond the prescience of the
Omnipotent is the verdict of an American
jury." In a Cleveland murdor case, where
the defendant knecked his man down and
deliberately kicked the life out of hi:n, the
jury brought in a verdict of "guilty of as
sault and battery." This has caused no
little J" law.l, n.- ~o" i'
might.
Oh! Mr. Andrews.
Pittsburg Telegraph.
"I have not gone into any county in the
State in behalf of Mr. Delamater."—Phila
delphia I titer lit: iv Kith Chairman Andrews.
"I am not taking an active part in
securing delegates for Mr. Delamater.'' —
Washitujton Interview with Chairman .In
drewn.
In this connection we again publish the
list of officeholders and offleeseekers who
took part in the Cambria County steal,
originally priuted on March 25:
George T. Swank,candidate for Congress.
Ilenry v. . Storey, applicant, for Post
office at Johusiown.
Henry D. Kinkead. Deputy Collector
Internal Revenue.
Ed. James, candidate for Legislature.
Among the delegates who were present
at the convention were:
Florentine Barker, Postmaster it Ebens
burg.
I). B. Wilson, Postmaster in Ashville
Township
F. A. Thompson, Postmaster at Lilly.
W. W. MeAteer, Postmaster at Loretto.
J. H. Veil, who got tbc Scalp Level Post
office for his mother-in-law.
Dr. J. C. Luke. Postmaster at South
Fork.
W. W- Empiield, Postmaster at Belsano.
John Weudroth,Postmaster in Coyle Tp.
T. R. Davis, in business with his son,
Postmaster at East Concmaugh.
J. A. Troxell, Postmaster at Portage.
O. H. Perry, Postmaster at Chest
Springs.
J. W. Hall, in Census Department at
Washington.
I W. P. Keese. Deputy Revenue Collector.
"The Day We Celebrate."
At the meeting'of the Union Veteran
Legion on Wednesday evening of last week.
Mr. U". A. Clark responded to the above
toa.-t as follows:
"We are met to-night to celebrate the
.r.iii'iver.-arv of the silver wedding of the
forced anion of- these United States.
Tw. ntv-five years ago to-day Gen. Lee
and his army surrendered —gave up the
attempt to divide the Union, and the
word was flashed all over the civilized
world that the war of the rebellion was at
au cad. Some of my .-omrades who are
present to-night were eye-witnesses to
that glorious scene. Oh! how many hearts
were mad'? glad oil that eventful day: how
many fond fathers and loving mothers,
whose sons hail been battling for the
right, and who had escaped death, re
joiced and thanked God that the«ruel war
was over: how many noble, true and lov
ing wives wept for joy at the prospect of
having husbands and fathers safely home
again; how many sweethearts went almost
wild with eestacv at the very thought of
knowing that their lovers had been spared
to come back to them, and the veterans,
how their hearts swelled with joy and
i )r ide—joy to know that they would meet
loved ones again, and to feel that their
hardship?', their wounds, their patriotism
had saved the Union, and preserved for
them, their loved ones and posterity, the
greatest and best republic on the earth.
M\- friends is it not right and proper, that
we should celebrate the ninth day of
April? Can you not join heartily with us
,-i celebrating the surrender of Appo
matox' Could we forget our comrades
who ended their earthly labors, our joy
to-night might be almost unalloyed; but
as members of the Union Veteran Legion
we here pledge ourselves to honor ami lore
nil forth't comrades trho fought in the
Ctiioii and helped to terminate that
bloodv war. upon the day we celebrate.
I cannot cluse without requesting the sons
. » f ."■> nr>mrft.noA
• » remember this, the clay your father*
l.e.L-d t celebrate, and always be ready to
ueleud the Government in whose cause
ronr fathers fought When the bloody hand
of tri sought its overthrow and de
-truction. And comrades of the T nion
Veteran Legion, let us continue to cele
brate in an appropriate manner, the day
upon which so many hearts were made
irfad, the day upon which we completed
our oath-bound contract with the Govern
ment, to continue to battle for its preserva
tion for three vears more or during the
war—the day that settled the question of
State rights forever; the day that com
pleted the freedom of three millions of
human beings; the birthday of universal
liberty; the completion of an inseparable
union of States; the birthday ot a De
mocracy in truth; the completion of a re
public that has no equal—and as we march
on nearer and nearer to the tinal roll call,
let us continue to celebrate the day so
pregnant with grand achievments. My
comrades. let us not forget that frue happi
hess consist* in battling for the right, and
let us continue to fight on and on to the
end. and try to consummate the grand
achievements"begun on the day we cele
brate.
Well done, Mr. Blaine.
Whatever else may come of the deliber
ations of the Pan-American Congress, the
agreement arrived at to hereafter settle all
national disputes between any two of the
Republics of Xorth, South and Central
America and Uayti by arbitration will be
esteemed as more tbun justifying all the
labor and expense that have attended the
sittings of the delegates. The only excep-
tion from matters of dispute which inusfrbe
arbitrated is in case a nation may believe
its independent existence at stake, when
arbitration may bo declined. The agree
ment of the Congress is at once binding
upon all the parties to it except the United
States, the assent of which will not have
been completed until after ratification by
the Senate. The treaty is to remain in
force twenty years after ratifications shall
have been exchanged. After that time any
nation dissatisfied with its terms may with
draw upon one year's notice.
This assurance of good understanding
am-eig the States of America ought to have
its effect in greatly reducing military and
naval expenditures. It ought also to be
an impressive lesson for the older States of
Europe, which are wasting the resources of
their people in maintaining vast military
organizations to insure peace by perpetual
readiness for war. An agreement of the
great I'owers to arbitrate their difficulties
would be the longest stride toward the
millennium that Christianized nations have
ever made.—Philadelphia Record
The Dependent Pension Bill.
The following are the principal points in
the Dependent Pension Bill, as passed by
the United States Senate:
Section 1 provides fur a pension to all
pare;: -of deceased soldiers or sailors who
left no widow or minor children, and who
are dependent on their own lalmr or the
contribution of friends, to date from
application.
Section 2 provides that all persons who
served three months in the army or navy
who are now or may be hereafter inca
pacitated from earning a living, and who
are dependent upon their own labor shall
be entitled to receive sl2 per month.
Section 3 provides for a pension for the
widow, minor children or dependent par
eats of tho e described in the second
section.
Section 4 iucreases the pension of minor
children from $2 to >r4 per month, and in
ease of idiocy or total disability the pen
sion shall continue for life.
Section 5 provides that attorneys or
agents shall charge no more than $lO for
services in obtaining the above pensions
under a penalty of .*SOO, or imprisonment
of two years, or both.
The Orphan Schools.
There are now four schools in this State
in which Soldiers' Orphans are provided
for, i. e., those at Cnioutown, White
Hall, Loysville and Butler. In his re
port on the Butler school Senator Greer,
male Inspector, says:
The Butler school, so far as the build
iis?- are in shape, is in excellent condition.
The equipments are generally good, and
the hool is succeeding nicely. The
edn-at ional department has been reorgan
ised and a new teacher added. At Union
t"'.vn the report says, the children pre
-'■!!' ■, fiiio healthy appearance, and seem
to be ; niteiiied and happy. The. dormi
t' UIU 4»U«I (lOm£urt<kl*lcr.
eooliidei ;irtment is in good order and
the dining-room of sufficient size to accomo
date nil the children. I wa« informed
that the table supplies for the month of
January amounted to $1,0(!9.37.
Miss Martin, female Inspector, sajs:
"At St. Paul's Orphan School they have
ICt) soldiers' orphans, thirty-two church
children and eight boarders. They have
erected a new dining-room and kitchen.
The former is crowded; the latter a good
-ize. Some improvements have been
made : n the main building, giving addi
tional room in the dormitories. A new
school li tilding i:- being erected and when
i — for u»' will relieve the crowded
ci idi: lon. I am -a:i -lied there is not
enough pro\ :'i'-d for the table in this
si iit:< i lie services of a male teacher
; iiouhl secured as Principal. Many of
!' " children are only be ml in their recita
tive ' e iii two days. I would suggest
that a physician be employed. The
ma.s v' uent of this institution is good."
WIU.IAM GALLOWAY, who ran the first
engine over the Baltimore i Ohio Rail
road, and who wi>s probably the oldest
locomotive engineeer in the world, died
suddenly of appoplexy at Baltimore on the
7th in ;t. He was born in Baltimore in
IS' 1 !!. He began his railroading career
Janu ry 2:>. las car dispatcher ut
Mount Clare for the I!, it 0., when horses
were i li to move the cars, before the iron
hone had appeared to revolutionize travel.
\\ ! ■ u l<u--,ves were introduced he ran
the first one from Baltimore to Ellicott
City. Mr. Calloway ran between Balti
more and Washington for forty-eight
yei'.r-. He is credited with but two acei
j il.-ats.
AT a recent ."ale of skins in London one
o; the lo' < wrs 230,000 Australian opossum
skins. At another sale 30,000 African
monkey skills were offered.
Prospect Items.
Be it read:
That the people are wondering what has
become of their news monger, but here we
are again.
That the Academy is prospering again
with 50 live, energetic students. The
Profs. Magee, Shanor. Kranz.
and Lepley.
That Hosea White, of Zelienople. and
Henry Beighley. of Harmony, made our
town a visit last Saturday and Sunday.
That Harry Heckel, of West iew, is
visiting at A. Shanor's. Who is glad now?
That A. M. Kiddle has treated his house
to a coat of paint. Right Alvin, others in
town need the same dose.
That Charles Weigle and Geo. Warren,
who hare been working at the hundred
foot, are home on a vacation.
That Lawrence Covert and wife, of Mc-
Keesport, are visiting at his brother
Thomas' here.
That the elective officers of Rustic
Lodge, I. 0. 0. F., for next term are: F.
D. Milleman, X. IK; J. 0. Dodds, V. 0.; G.
P. Weigle. Sec'y; N. S. Grossman, Treas.;
T. 1). McConnell. J- W. Shaffer, and J. H.
McLure, Rep. to Grand Lodge; T. U.
Boehin, E. L. McCleary, J. 0. Dodds, A.
Bowers and P. H. Sechler, Reception Com
mittee.
That Charley Kelly and Frank Haun,
two of our base-ball players, are talking of
joining the players'league. They are Xo.
1 twirlers.
That Henry Langherst and Howard
Jones have gone to Braddocks to work at
their trade—carpentering.
That W. G. Weigle intends to go to
Franklin, this summer, to train horses for
Myers Bros.
That April Fool's Day is past, but if you
wish to see Charley Hall look funny all
over his face, just ask him what made him
leave his work aud walk half a mile to see
Gns Bowers.
That Mrs. J. Q. Sullivan and son have
returned from a visit to her mother, Mrs.
McLure, of St. Paul, Minn.
That Samuel Graham, one of the best
engineers in Penn'a, has been working for
L. R. English <fr Co.. who have one of the
best saw-mills in the county.
Jo COSITY.
Pcrtersville Items.
Every person seems to be enjoying the
good roads.
The farmers are all busy plowing and
some are sowing their oats.
The United Presbyterians intend hold
ing their el urch in the Presbyterian church
until they have their own church repaired.
A terrific hail-storm parsed over our
village on last Tuesday night about ten
o'clock. It broke a great many windows.
Mr. McCalinont, our butcher, takes four
beeves to the oil country every week.
Miss Kate Pringle, of Plain Grove, is
visiting friends in town a few days.
Mr. Daniel Kennedy, of Maharg. Butler
Co., was to see his father Win. Kennedy,
who has been sick for some time.
Professor Kinies, having finished a suc
cessful term of seven months school, has
returned to his home in Grove City. We
thank him for the good he has done to our
school and hope that when our school
opens next September we will find him
in his old place.
Mr. Ed Hamilton, of New Castle, was in
town on Sunday.
James Ramsey and Robert Magee, of
Harlansburg, were iu town last week.
Frank Heberliug, having finished a six
month term of school, is at home.
fm. Kinsey has returned home from
Ogle, where he has been teaching school.
J. R. Humphrey, being a juryman last
week of Court, had to go back this week.
He says he don't like this kind of courting.
VITA.
J NO. W. CHALFANT, of Pittsburgh, is
out in an open letter urging Chief Justice
Paxon as a compromise candidate for
Governor; but why men like Gen. Osborne,
Major Montooth, or Secretary Stone,
should be set aside for him, he does not
say and cannot say.
"A BEAUTIFUL Ohio girl leaves her home
in disgrace and runs off with a negro wait
er. She was one of the leaders of our best
society.'"— Ex.
Pretty is that pretty does. And what
do you mean by best society? Richest?
THK German scientist who has discover
ed that coffee will kill microbes has
neglected to tell what is to be done with
microbes who won't drink coffee for break
fast.
A FRENCH paper thus refers to a recent
murder: "The miscreant was evidently in
search of money, but M. Duraud had
prudently deposited all his cash in the
bank, and consequently lost only his life."
AT the election for members of the
school board in Salina, Kansas, last week,
two prominent ladies were defeated by
their colored cooks.
THE great chimney of the Clark Thread
Works at Newark, N. J., which is 335 feet
high, was struck by lightning twice, the
strokes being 13 seconds apart, on the
morning of March 28 last. The exterior
of the structure was badly damaged, and
as there was no other way of getting at it,
a young man of the town bnilt a ladder up
its side by driving bolts into the brickwork.
It was a perilous undertaking and when he
nearod the top his progress was watched
by thousands every day.
DEATHS
BROWN—At his home in Concord Twp.,
Butler Co., Pa., April 3, 1890, George
Brown, aged 54 years.
BRYDEN—At her home in Franklin, Pa.,
Thursday, April 10, 1890, Mrs. Eleanor
Bryden, aged 75 years.
She was born in Washington, Pa., and
was a sister of John N., Samuel and
Campbell I'urviance, and Mrs. Win. Haz
lett, deceased, and of Mrs. Ann E. Orr and
Mrs. Edward Bredin. of Ilntler.
McGONIGLE—At her home in Jefferson
Twp., Auril 7, 1890, Mrs. Mary Emily
McGonigle, wife of Wilson McGonigle,
and daughter of George Welsh, iu the
43d year of her age/
RUSSELL—At his home in Concord Twp.,
Tuesday. April 15, 1890, David Kussell,
aged about 85 years.
MAXWELL—In Butler, April 17, 1890,
Addisou Maxwell, sou of Mrs. Maxwell
of the Scbreibcr House, aged 25 years.
Dyspepsia
Do«« not get well of itself; It requires careful,
persistent attention and a remedy that will assist
nature to throw off the causes ami tone up the
riigeative organs till they perform their duties
willingly. Among the agonies experienced by the
dyspeptic, are distress before or after eating, loss
of appetite, irregularities of the bowels, wind or
gas aud pain in the stomach, heart-burn, sour
stomach.etc.,causing mental depression, nervous
irritability and sleeplessness. If you are dis
couraged be of good cheer and try Hood's Sar«
sapariila. It has cured hundreds, it will curt you.
Hood's Sarsaparilla
Sold by all druggists. $1; six for (5. Made
only by C. I. HOOD & CO.. Lowell, Mass.
100 Doses One Doflar
PITTSBURGH NURSERIES,
(Kutabllakrd 1N4«.)
OCR ELEGANT ILLCSTRATED CAT
ALOGUE for 1890 will be mailed on appli
cation. Every Farmer, Gardener, Amateur
or owner of a lot should have one.
Orders for flowers and floral emblems
have immediate attention. Telephone 239.
John R. & A. Murdoch,
508 Smith field, St.,
PITTSBURGH, I'A.
tw.
&akiN 6
POWDER
Absolutely Pure.
This Powder never vane*. A marv«J of
purity, streugth and wboleeomeness. More
economical than the ordinary kinds, and can
not be bold in competition with the multitude
ot low tests, short weUcht.aluuin or phosphate
powders. Sold only in cans.
BOYAL BAKING POWDER CO.,
IOC Wall Street N. Y.
POLITICAL.
We are authorized to announce the fol
lowing gentlemen as candidates for the
offices under which their nauies appear,
subject to the Republican primary of But
ler county, on
Saturday, May 24tta, 1890.
from 1 to 7 P. m.
FOR DELEGATES TO THE STATE
CONVENTION.
A. L. TIMISLIN,
Of Fairview Boro.
-W, H, HITTKB.
Ot Butler.
S. D. BKLL,
Of Millers town.
JOHN DI.NDINUER,
Of Zelienople.
CAPT. GEORGE W. FLEEGER.
Of Butler.
JAMES A. MCMAHLIN - ,
Of Adams twp.
FOR CONGRESS.
NEWTON BLACK,
Of Butler.
FOR ASSEMBLY.
(2 to nominate.)
CAPT. R. IRWIN BOGGS,
Of Zelienople.
JOSEPH THOMAS. JR.,
Of Karns City.
ANDREW G. VILT.IAMS,
Of Butler.
HARLAN BOOK,
Of Franklin twp.
JOSIAH M. THOMPSON.
Of Brady Twp.
FOR SHERIFF.
A. G. CAMPBELL,
Of Oakland Twp.
W. B. DOBDS,
Of Muddycreek Twp.
W. M. BROWN,
Of Forward Twp.
OWEN BRADY,
Of Donegal twp.
FOR PROTHONOTARY.
JAMES H. GIBSON,
Of Washington Twp.
CAPT. JOHN G. BIPPUS,
Of Oakland Twp.
SAMUEL M. SEATON,
Of Marion twp.
FOR REGISTER <fc RECORDER.
J. P. DATTS,
Of Brady Twp.
D. E. DALE.
Of Butler.
H. A. AYRES.
Of Butler.
JOHN FINDLEY,
Of Butler.
FOR TREASURER.
JAMES S. WILSON,
Of Centreville.
JOHN T. MARTIN,
Of Buffalo Twp.
FOK CLERK OF COURTS.
JOSEPU CRISWELL,
Of Butler Twp.
W. 11. CAMPBELL,
Of Concord Twp.
WM. C. FINDLEY,
Of Butler, (formerly of Clay Twp.)
FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONERS.
(2 to nominate.)
WILLIAM W. BRANDON,
Of Connoquenessing Twp.
I. S. P. DEWOLKK,
Of Slipperyrock Twp.
J. B. CUNNINGHAM,
Of Clinton Twp.
J AS. STEPHENSON,
Of Summit Twp.
ISAAC 11. CHRISTIE.
Of Concord Twp.
J. C. KISKAUDON,
Of Allegeny Twp.
S. W. MCCOLLOUGH,
Of Fairview Twp.
CHARLES F. SMITH,
Of Buffalo Twp.
R. S. HINDMAN,
Of Cherry Twp.
A. D. W kir.
Of Butler.
FREDERICK EBERT,
Of Clinton Twp.
SAMUEL T. MARSHALL,
Of Bntler.
JAMES WILSON,
Of Franklin twp.
JOHN J. MCGARVEY,
Of Mercer twp.
FOR COUNTY AUDITOR.
(2 to nominate.)
JACOB ALBERT,
Of Franklin twp.
A. M. DOUTHBTT,
Of Penn twp.
S. L. CLIEKSKMAN,
Of Muddy creek twp.
GEORGE W. COOPER,
Of Slipperyrock twp.
S. M. SWARTZLANDER,
Of Butler, (formerly of Fairview twp.)
FOR COUNTY CORONER.
JOHN KENNEDY,
Of Butler.
BUTLER COUNTY
Mutual Fire insurance Co.
Office Cor. Main & Cunningham Sts.
3. C. ROESSING, PBEBIDKNT.
WM. CAMPBELL TKEASUIUCR.
H. C. IIEINEMAN, SKOHETAKY.
DIRECTORS:
J. L Purvis, Samuel Anderson,
William Campbell J. W. Hurkhart,
A. Troutm&n. Henderson Oliver,
G.C. Boemlnif, .lames Stepbeuaon,
Dr. W. Irvln, Henry Whltinlre.
J. K. Taylor. H. 0. Beinemaii,
LOYAL M'JUNKIK. Geii. Aer't.
BUTL.EB,
LEGAL ADVERTISEMENTS
Administrators and Executors of estates
can secure their receipt books at the CITI
ZEN office.
Notice to School Directors of
Butler Borough.
Centlemtn: —ln pursuance of the Act of
Assembly, of April 9, 1667, and the supple
ments thereto, yon arc hereby notified to
meet in convention at the Directors room,
in the Jefferson street school building, in
the borough of Butler, Pa., on the fir.'t
Tuesday of May, 1890, at the hour of half
past seven o'clock, p. M., of said day. and
select, viva voce, by a majority of the
whole unmber of Directors present, one
person of literary and scientific acquire
ments. and of skill and experience in the
art of teaching, as Borough Superintend
| ent. for said borongh of Butler, for the
I three succeedingschoolyears;and certify the
| result to the State Superintendent of Com
| mon Schools at Harrisburg, Pa., as by
said Act of Assemblv, von are required to
do. JOHN W. BROWN.
Pres. Butler School Board.
Estate of George Brown, dee'd,
I.\TK OF CoNCor.n Twi\, BUTLER CO., PA.
Letters testamentary on the above estate
having been granted t» the undersigned, all
persons knowing themselves indebted to said
estate will please make immediate payment,
ami any having claims against said estate
will present them for settlement.
MAP.IA J. BROWN, KX X,
Greece City, liu:!er Co., I'a.
GEO. W. FLEEGER, Att'y.
Executors' Notice.
WHEREAS, letters of administraiiou have
been granted to the undersigned on the
estate of S. W.Shannon, of Franklin Twp.,
Butler Co., Pa., all persons knowing them
selves indebted to said estate will please
make immediate payment, ami any having
claims against said estate w:lt present them
duly authenticated for settlement.
I A. W. SHANNOK,
-j Prospect, Pa.
(JOHN P. RAPSON,
Executors.
Executor's Notice.
(ESTATE OF J. B. LONG, DKU'D, LATE OF
FKANKLIN TWP., BUTLEK CO., PA.
Letters testamentary on the above named
estate having been granted to the undersigned,
all persons knowing themselves indebted to it
will please make immediate payment, and
auy having claims against it will present
them tor settlement.
KOB'T MCBRIDE, Ex'r.
AicCandiess P. O.
W. D. BRANDON, Att'y.
Auditor's Notice.
O. C. No. IS, June Term, IS9O.
In the matter of the 6rst and partial ac
count ot liugh fchaw and Robert Black, ad
ministrators of Margaret Shaw, dee'd.
Having been apj>oiuted auditor in the
above case to make distribution of the funds
in the hands of the administrators to and
among the persons legally entitled thereto, 1
hereby give notice that 1 will attend to the
duties ol this appointment at my office, No.
17, E. Jelleison at., iiutler, Pa., at 10 A. M.,
Ihuraday, April 24, lfeyo, ai wnich time and
place all parlies interested may attend, it
they think, proper.
IRA MCJUNKIX, Auditor.
PUBL C NOTICE.
Notice Is hereby given that lteed Gee of Clar
ion Co., has leased to James Gallagher, ol Bu.-
ler Co., his one buy mare with a wnite star on
one set of single namcss, and one buck
bo;ird wagon, lor tne term ol one >eux Irom
dale, i agree lo take good care o£ said proper
ty and return the same at the end ol said ler ...
and not lo take the property outside ot the
stale without ivir. Goes knowledge and con
sent. JAMES OALLAGUEK.
March 28, 1890.
Dissolution Notice.
The partnership heretofore existing be
tween S. P. Pu:-:ter and John Suiton under
the tirm name ot Painter & Sutton at Euclid,
Butler Co., Pa., is this day mutually dis
solved. The books and accounts ot said lirm
are in the hands of S. P. Painter for col
lection. All persons owing said tirm will
please call on S. P. Painter, Esq., and settle
the same and all persons having claims
against said tirm will preseut the same for
settlement.
S. P. PAINTER.
March 21, 1890. JOHN SUTTON.
Dissolution,
The tirm of Hers & Cypher has expired by
limitation ot tluae uud all persons Indebted to
said tirm are requested to make immediate pay
ment, aud persons having claims against llle
tirm are requested to present the same ior pay
ment. The boots uid papers will be louud at
the Hanking House ol John Berg £ Co. Butler,
Penna.
JOHN BEHG JR. )
March 11, lsuo. IIKNKY A. BEKG.J
MAHY BERG. )
Executors of the iast will ot Joliu Berg,
dee'd. UEOKOE A. CYPHER.
Administrator's Notice.
(ESTATE OF JAMES P. M'QUISTION, DEC'I), LATE
OF OENTKEVILLE BOKO)
Letters of administration on the above nam
ed estate having been granted to the under
signed, all persons kuowlug themselves Indebt
ed tu said estate will please make Immediate
payment and any navlug claims against said
estate will pr-seiit tliem duly authenticated
lor settlement.
c. P. L. MCQPISTIOK, Butler. Pa.
W, IIKNKY WILSON, silpperyr'k P. O.
Admin istiators.
Notice.
Notice Is hereby given to the members ol the
farmers Mutual lire lusuranco Company ot
Hann. hstown and vicinity that on February Ist
lsyo, the votes on the gas question were count
ed by the appointed commit'ee, and the result
was yo votes ot a majority against gas in Insur
ed buildings, and In cousequeuce ot tlie above
result the Directors ol the company, at their
ineetlug on Saturday, February sth, lsiio, an
nulled and made void Article is, Section 7, in
the By-Laws ol the Constitution, unanimously,
and substituted iu the place of the annulled ar
ticle the following article, viz
If a loss is occasioned by tlie use of gas or oil
for fuel in dwelling houses or other buildings
the Insured forfeiis his or her Insurance.
Further ii was adopted by a unanimous vote
of the Board to insure haystacks, the same as
hay in buildings, wherever the hay may be,
either on the premies of the insured or other
places.
The Board of Directors hereby nolilies all
the members of the compali) insured using gas
at present to Inform the undersigned Secreta
ry at once.
I>y order of the President.
HKNUY HECK, Secretary.
DELANO, February s, mo-
Xotice.
Parties wishing to invest money, certain
to bring fair returns, are invited to care
fully investigate the inducements offered
by "THE BUTLER SALT-MANUFAC
TURIN'G COMPANY AND CHEMICAL
WOKKS." The stock consists of 8,000
shares, the par value ot which is SSO.
For the further developing of the works,
some of this stock is put on the market.
For prices and particulars inquire of
J AS. F. BRITTAIN, Butler, Pa.
Office on Diamond. #
Found.
The subscriber found a newly made suit of
men's clothes on the bank of the Connoque
uestsing Creek, not far from Butler, on April
12th inst., of which information can be had
at the CITIZEN' office or the tailoring shop of
Mr. Jesse Glenn, and the clothes had by
proving property, paying lor this advertise
ment and other charges.
JOHN DEETS.
Butler, Pa., April 12, 1890.
R. S. NICUOLLS, L. it. HEWITT
NEW LUMBER YARD
R S. NICHOLLS & CO.,
Dealers iu ail kinds of
Rough and Vt'orked Lumber.
DOORS,
SASH,
KLINDS,
SHINGLES,
LATH, ETC.,!
Hard and Soft Coal-
We have a large stock of all kinds of Lum
ber, Oil Well Kigs, Etc.
Call and get our prices and see our stock.
Mail Orders Promptly Attended
To.
Office anil yard on
MONROE ST., NEAR WEST PEK.N DEPOT,
BUTLEIt, PA.
WKMfi
ON LLu ill 111 COMMISSION
All that Is required is KOOtliii ■ IITPFI
character and willingness tojlj||i|L|l
work. Write at once to Ellnin- Hft II I I 11
ser A Harry, Kochester, N. Y.,« HII I LI/
Mt. Hope Nurseries. tstatliHied IWO.
pita i J... •, :'.v'.,"i.vaiiti
*iioldtiri.i. p. r,-.•v.Miirod. i-rn.uuK.at |K..1.;.,8
—lfcr. ilUlx: . s« -'u. li."
ONLY TOO WILLING.
V *V\ know that I am no match for }o-i in wealth, weight or
i-V ' social position."
- v,- "I know how unworthy 1 am of yon, too; but may I not
- v* v.T- ~ J
hope that some time—some day— "
'"Aes,' she asserted, lifting her regal head; "Someday,
/' V\ why not now? lam ONLY TOO WILLING"
1 4
/ sji | That yoa should compare our goods and prices those «t any other
>V_ _ fyf dealer, aud then decide whether you do better elsewhere We are willing
/|! - \ I A VA because wo know that we Lave tLe clinch ou every other buy«r. We sell for
J \ ' eM, > because we buy lor less
-o- WE WANT YOU -o-
To buy where you can do best, and if we can t do bettor than any other lian, tve at« willing' to »e« yon go „w*>
but «ve know you'll not: for we can and will do better, became we offoi belter goods at lower prices. P.,me and
sample our goods ;md
W kll m-v ii i<; you ijappy
With bargains that are at tbe top notch of cheapness and value. Other* luay < hum to d< as w. 11 by vol., but we
do all we claim, and perform every promise we make Are you willing to leud us your car.' We will'pay you
bigger interest ou tbe loan thau you could get on hard cash We are better ou the trade ibuu we are on the talk.
But we can tell what we know so that you cau understand in. Are you willing;' Wo dou't stretch thiugs when
we say we have tbe largest room, largest stock, greatest variety and sell at lower prices than auy bouse in the
whole county. All the latest novelties and standard goods will t e found in our 'ate arrivals of spring and summer
styles in mens', boy's and children's fashionable clothing, hats, shirts, uuderwear, collars, cuffs, *ties, hosiery
trunks, valises, satchels, umbrellas, overalls, jumper jackets, jewelry, watches, chains, cuff and collar but
tons, scarf pins, ear and finder rings, breast and lace pins, brushes, hnndtnirrors, purse*, bill aud pocket books
combs and hundreds of other articles yon may stand in need of, all of .vhich we guarantee to be correct styles,'
choice fabrics, sure lits and lowest prices We always fiud people willing and eairer to buy in the cheapest mark
et, and having this spring secured special bargains iu every department, you will And us rcadv and willing— ONLY
TOO WILLING—to render promptly, courteously aud intelligently any needed or desired "assistance in making
your selections. We are ONL\ TOO WILLING to show goods and quote prices, no difference whether you
wish to purchase or not. Come in at ycur convenience or earliest opportunity aud feast your eyes upon our im
mense assortment, siudy our prices and we'll take our chances on your going awav empty handed.
Stand by those who stand by you! What does that mean?" It meaus that"we have stood by you for years.
You have stood by us, are you willing to continue? It means help lor you. Those who want to sell goods in our
line will have to see what we are doing, and come down to our notch. If they do any cbia music they'll have to
take the tune from us. If they march they'll have to take up our step as we lead and propose to keep on leading,
and others must follow or fall We are not making a bluff for trade; that game is played out. We are Btatiog
facts. The proof lies in our goods which are leaders in every line. It's all moonshine to talk about bigger or bet
ter bargains than we make They can't be made. "Love at first sight" must be the fate of every one who gazea
on our goods; not only because they are handsome but because they are cheap in every sense of the word. No
body can beat us in stock. Nobody can beat us on price Buy where you like but see our stock before yon buy.
ARE YOU WILLING ? It will be money in your pocket, and that's what we are all after.
With tbe kindest regards for your very, vexy liberal patronage in the past, lam ONLY TOO WILLING
to try to merit the same in the future. I remain as ever vourß to please,
jO>. A.. 'MK 3SS <£? K ▼
Champion Clothier, Furnisher and Hatter,
No 11 >" j St., - - Duffy's Block, Butler* Fa.
Diamond : - : Hotel,
Fronting Diamond, Butler, Pa.
THOMAS WASSON, Pro'r.
Good rooms, good meals, stabling in con
nection, everything first class.
NIXON'S HOME,
35 N. MCKEAN ST.. BUTLER, PA.
Meals at;aU hours. Open all night.
Breakfast 25 cents.
Dinner 25 cents.
Supper 25 cents.
Lodging 25 cents.
SIMEON NIXON - PKOP'R.
iumKiiufa num.
No. 88 and 90, S. Main St.,
BUTLER, - -
Near New Court House—formerly Donaldson
House —jrood accommodations for travelers.
Good stabling connected.
[4- 9 -'B6-lyi H KITENMUT LKR. PropT.
Willard Hotel
W. H. REIHING, Prop'r
BUTLER, - fA.
STABLING IS CONNECTION'.
SAMPLE BOOM Tor COMMERCIAL TIiAVELEKS
SAMPLE KOOM. LIVEKY IN CONNECTION
Hotel Vogeley
(Strictly First Clans.)
HENRY L. BECK. PROP'B.
J. 11. FACBEL, Manager. Butler, Pa.
Jordan's Restaurant
All oar readers visitinp Butler
will do well to go to Sam Jordan's
restaurant (or their meals. We serve
lunches, soft drinks, tobacco and
cigars. No. 4, S. Main St., under
Schneideman's clothing store.
UttSMIIi NIBSEiiItS.
ERIKPA.
All stock guaranteed to be in good con
dition when delivered.
We replace all trees that fail to grow.
REFERENCES IX BUTLER:
J. P. Lowry, W. T. Mechling, Jame
Shanor, Jr., J. E. Forsythe, Geo. Shalfner
G. Walker, Esq., Ferd Reiber, Esq. and D
L. Cleeland.
G. F. KING, AGT.
EITENMILLEtt HOUSE, BUTLER, PA.
Planing Mill
-AND—
Lumber Yarcl
J. L. FU ttVlfe. L. O. FCKVId.
S.G.Purvis&Co.
MAN UFACTCKRKfci AND DEAL.KKS IN
Bough and planed Lumber
OF KV«iY DESCRIPTION,
SHINGLES, LATH
& SEWER PIPE.
Butler, Pa.
Spring Millinery
In all the latest styles.
New Ilats,
New Ribbons,
New Trimmings.
All the new things in flowers,
laces, gloves, veils, caps,
AX
M. F. &M- Marks'.
No. 9 S. Main Butler, Pa.
LUMBER IS ADVANCING.
Saw Mills, Steam Engines.
Shingle Mills, Hay Presses, &c.
If you wont a FIRST-CLASS SAW VILL
j send for Catalogue and special price to lntro
! duce in vour section to
| X. B. FAKtJt HAK CO. (Ltd.) YORK. PA.
j 011161 WiieUK Mill,
BUT*,*:**, i'i.
H. FULIJERTOK, Prop'r,
i Blauketa, Flannels und Yarn
Haniilaciurcd oi'Piire Itiil-
Ici Con my Wool.
We guarantee our s'oods to be strictly all wool
and noarsenlc or any other poisonous material
used in dvelng. We sell Wholesale or retail.
Samples and prices furnished free to dealers on
application by mall.
I
WHEX YOIT
I
VISIT PITTSBURG
CALL ON
JOHN R. & A. MURDOCH,
! 50S Smithfield St., for Trees, Seeds, Li'lies
I Grape Vines* Hardy Roses, Canary B rds,
I Gold Fisb, etc.
Descriptive Fall Catalouge mailed free'
' APCWTC to canvass for the sale of our
MUCII i O Home-Grown Nursery Stock.
WASTED MOST LIBERAL TERMS.
! UiiMjiialed facilities. One of the largest, oldest-
I established, and tiest Nurseries in the country.
Address W. & T. SMITH, Oeim Jiunierjf,
Established In IS4«. lieneva, S. Y.
FOB SALE.
The Evans City llour mill. This mill is
situated in Evans City, and is iu one of the
best localities in the county; ou railroad,
and surrounded by a splendid grain grow
ing country. This mill will be sold cheap.
For further particulars call on or address
JAMES SI TTOX.
Evans City, l'a.
Mifflin Street Livery.
W. G. BIEHIi, PropT.
One square west of Main St., on
Mifflin St. All good, safe horses;
new buggies and carriages. Landaus
for weddings and funerals. Open
day and uiglit. Telephone No. 24.
Hotels and Depots,
W. S. Gregg is now running a line
of carriages between the hotels and
depots of the town
Charges reasonable. Telephone
No. 17, or leave orders at HoU*l
Vogeley.
Good Livery in Connection.
New Livery Stable.
New Slock,
New Rigs.
—OPEN DAY AND NIGHT—
Horses fed and boarded.
PETER KRAMER, Prop'r
39, W. Jefferson St., Butler, Pa
Wm. F. Miller.
Manufacturer of
Stair Hails,
Balusters
and Newel-posts.
(.All kinds of wood-turning done to order, also
Decorated and Carved wood-work, such as
Casing. Corner blocks, Panels aud all kinds of
fancy wood-work lor Inside decoration or
houses.
CAI.LAM)M:E BAMPLKS.
Something new and attractive. Also
FURNITURE;
at iowestVash prices.
Store at No. It'. N Maiu street.
Factory at No. 5», X, Washington street.
BUTI.K P&NNA.
RAILROAD TIME TABLES.
WEST PKJSN B. R.
On ami after Montlay, Nov. 13, 1889, traiu
will leave Butler as follows:
MARKET at 0:10 a.m., arriving at Alleghe
uy at 9:10 a. in.; connects east for BJairsville
with Day Express, arriving at Philadelphia
at 7 p.ui.
EXPKKSS at 8:30 a. m., arriving at Alleghe
ny at 10:35 a. in.; docs not connect for the
i east, but couuects with A. V. R. R. north
' nod south.
MAIL at 2:35 p. ID., and goes through to
.Allegheny, arriving there at. 4:40 p. m.; ton
uects east for Philadelphia.
ACCOMMODATION at 5:00 p, m., aud con
nects at the Junction with Freeport Accom
modation, arriving at Allegheny at 7:35 p
m., and connects east as far as Apollo.
Trains connecting for Butler leave Alleghe
I ny at 8:20 a.m., 3:15 p. m. and 5:45 p. m.
' Trams arrive at Butler at 10:30 a, m. aud
5:00 and 7:50 p. m.
I VITTSBUKG, SHKXANOO <ST LAKE EKIE K. R
Corrected to fust time.
Trains leave Butler for Greenville at 5:40
and 10:30 a. ui. and 5:00 p. in.
Trains leaving the P. & \V. depot in Al
legheny at 7:40, and the West Peon depot at
i i!:J0 a, m, and 3:15 p. m. connect at Butler
with trains North on this road.
Trains arrive at Butler from Greenville at
I 10:10 a, m. aud 2:25 aud ti:32 p. m; the 10:10
| connects with the P. & W. to Allegheny and
, the 2:25 with the West Peun.
Trains leave Hilliards at 7:45 a. in. and 12:
iHi ui. slow time, connect for Butler, and the
5 p IU. train from Butler connects at Branch
ton tor Hilliards.
No Sunday trains. Passengers with tick
ets will be carried on the local freight that
leaves the P. X W. June, at 1:15 p. m. bat
not ou the other freight trains.
The 5:40 a. m. train from Butler connects
at Osgood with trains on the L. S. & M. S.,
arriving at Cleveland 10:40 a. in., Chicago
9:10 p. m., Erie 11:28 a. m., Buffalo 2".:i5 p.
m., and at Mercer with W. N. Y. <£ P.,
arriving at New Castle at 9:05 a. in .
The 10:30 a. in. train from Butler connects
at Mercer with traius on the W. N. Y. & P.,
arriving at Franklin at 2:00 p. in. and Oil
City at at 2:10 p. m., and at Shenango with
the N. V. P. & O. for Meadville, Jamestown,
Buffalo, Olean and New York; also at
Osgood for Oil City.
The 5:0o p. m. train connects at Mercer tut
i New Castle, and at Shenango for Meadville
and Sharon.
P. & W. B. B.
Corrected to fast time—One hour faster
I than schedule time.
Trains leave Butler for Allegheny City
at 4:20 and 10:20 a. in., and 3:55 P. m.
The New Castle and western mail leaves
at 8:15 a. m., and the Chicago & Western ex
press at 1:50 p. in.
Trains leaves Butler for the North at 10:30
a. in., and 7:55 p. m. ,
Trains arrive at Butler from the South at
0: 55 a. m. and 12:10, 3:20, 7:40 and 8:30 p. m
A train arrives from Clarion at 10:00 a. m.
' and from Kane at 3:40 p. m.
Traius connecting for Butler leave Alle
gheny at 7:40 and :0:00 a. m.aud 1:25, 5:30,
aud ti:3o p. m.
The 8:15,10:20 and 1:50 trains from Butler
toCaliery,and 7:40 and 1:25 trains from Alle
gheny to Butler run on Sunday, also the
train that leaves Callery for Butler at 11:21,
arriving at 12:10.
Trains leaving Butler at 8:15 a. la. and
1:50 p- m. connect at Callery for the West.
' SCHCTTE & O'BRIEN
Sanitary Plumbers
And (ias Fitters.
DEALERS IN
Sewer Pipe,
Gas Fixtures,
Globes and
Natural Gas Appliances.
Jefferson St.,opp. Lowry House
BUTLER, IM
POSITION OFFERED.
If you are in need of a good paying posit ion
and think you have the qualities of a good
salesman, you will do well to write us at
once. "We will pay good coinuiissJon or
salary and expense* to a good man. Tho
position we offer is a permanent one. Ad
dress at once,
SELOVKR & AT WOOD
Nurserymen, Geiuna.J^V^
TWO CHOICE SCHOOLS.
BROOKE HALL,
For Girls and Young Ladies.
Shortlidge Media
Academy,
For Boys and Young Men.
SWITHIN C. SHORTLIDGE, A M
(UAKVARD GRADUATE.)
MEDIA, PA., (Near Philadelphia./

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