OCR Interpretation


The Union daily times. [volume] (Union, S.C.) 1918-current, October 03, 1922, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86071063/1922-10-03/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Spwb Thi n mug Ch mm I
Is TwMtkth Century
Wonder Show
For many years the Spark* Circu* r
has been known m one of America'* 1
foremost tented enterprises. Each *
year something new has been added ^
until now It ranks among the best of d
the "Big Tops," and this season with v
one of the greatest arrays of per- c
formers, horses and equipment ever 1
befor carried, it is pronounced a ban- *
ner one. When the show visits this 1
city it will be exhibited in its own v
specially constructed tents. It is *
said that the Sparks menagerie >s
equal to any on the road today. AI 3
magnificent introductory pageant smd J
grand revue, enlisting several hun- x
dreds of performers, companies of *
horses, elephants and gorgeous par.i- 1
phernalia, opens the main tent program.
v
This program presents many of the 1
world's stars of the arenic world as- *
sisted by scores upon scores of oth- '
ers. There are several companies of :
dumb actors. Everything ts given m *
a more lavish manner than ever oc- 1
fore. Three rings and an elevated -v
stage are m ed to take care of the 1
acrobatic and musical seals, the trained
bears, comedy pigs and the famous '
Sparks herds of elephants and a long 1
list of acts which requires nearly two 1
hours to present. This twentieth con- '
tury wonder circus has become one 1
of the greatest institution on the road <
today, and just as there are more nun *
and women, more seals and more ele- (
phant actors added, so there are move 1
clowns, more horses, more ponies, to- J
delight the children, more and better; '
trained dogs, pigs, moneys bears ; *
more of everything. ' 1
The street parade which will pre-'
cede the initial exhibition here, is far 1
and away the most novel ever ?t- 1
tempted. This city will see iTie circus <
TU 1 > ...ul u-iu -i
i iiui nua > , v/v iuuui w itu iiuii1 'ii - 1
ternoon and evening performances. 1
Hear This Concert The
following is a program of the
Lewis Concert Company, which will
be in Union October 9th. This is the '
rst number of the splendid course }
secured for this season: 1
"The Land of the Might Have Been" <
Harris [
"Keep on Hopin'" Maxwell j
Entire Company r
"Legend" Wieniewski e
"Mazurka do Concert" Austin o
Mr. Schuler v
"La donne mobile," opera (Rigoletto) li
Verdi o
"Pale Moon" Logan t,
"On the Stairs" Mana Zucca k
"Traveling to the Grave" . . . Reddiek
Mr. Lewis n
Adaptation from play "Happiness" r
Manners :t
Miss Adams c
"May Night" Palmgren h
"Hungarian" McDowell t
Miss Colliton n
"Ava Marie" Schubert n
"Zregunerweisen" Sarasate s
Mr. Schuler b
"Character Sketch" Selected h
Miss Adams o
"Young Tom O'Doven" Russel g
"The Little Home I Love" . . . O'Hara "
"Perspicacity" Cartla.i
"The Great Awakening" .. . Kramer s
Mr. Lewis r
The tickets are on sale now at b
Tinsley's Jewelry Store and the ti
prices are for six numbers only $3.00 t
for a season ticket or two for $5.00 1:
to one person. All school children n
cni secure a season ticket for $2.00. w
Arrangements have been made that p
no numbers will come in November
durirg the Gypsy Smith meeting. 1>
Pa. vour ticket now and help to t<
make it possible to bring high class (>
lyceum talent to Union, nnd help your i
children to appreciate the best.
Favors Admission of Women
To the Rabbinate
Cincinnati, Oct. 1 ? Hi'ui ; ?:?vid
I 11 I I I WI UllV ?l IJ 'J #1* Wish
synagogues here, i.lac *s himse'f ''
on record as favoring th admission
f women to the rahbin.it?, an almost s
revolutionary step, in an editorial in 1
a recent issue of The A n ri?ar Israel- j"1
ite. In his article he lraces the h:st<?ry
of the religious emancipation of
women from the days when th"y we**e a
segregated in the synagogues in spe- n
< ial balconies as "religiously mier or '
to the present, when they are ; inly _
established* in the congregations of
the reformed churches.
"Every form of change which granted
woman more religious freedom ha3
been fought as a break from the ^
past," the editorial states, "and it is *'
upon this ground that the admission ('
of women to the rabbinate will be ?
fought. Such arguments are futile in M
e\v of the advance of woman in cv- r'
ery sphere. ^
' Who knows but that some woman 11
may arise who, gifted with the pro- I1
phetic fire of a Deborah, may arouse v
the hosts of Israel out of their indifference
and lead them on to conquer
new spiritual heagths ? The dead hand
of the past should not be permitted to
close the door of opportunity that P
may open out to great vistas." ^
r m CI
SPECIAL ADVERTISEMENTS a
FOR SALE?One flower box 5 feet
long, filled with hardy, growing
flowers. Price $3.f?0. Mrs. Joe Seawall,
Pine street. It S(
MONEY TO LOAN at 6 per cent on ^
farm lands only. Jno. K. Hamblin, v
Attorney for Atlantic Joint Stock c,
Land Bank. 1499-tf n
m , I
The first known advertisement ap- j,
peared in a Greco-Roman drinking |
cup, it is said. It bears the inscription,
"Made by Gnnion. Let the buyer e
remember." to
A '
I 1 L1 LJ._ aj_[ . m J-U- 1 1 t
Wl^vr Oft Boo?& to
Rhral GoU lt??h Day*
Amhonure, Aia*ka, Oct. 2.?'Announcement
thut big oil int?re?ts w<ll
oon start drilling fox oil in the Oo!d
lay district of Alaska promises to
rring the thrilling scones of gold rush
lays to life again, according to men
vho have visited the new fields recently.
For this new oil country, say
hose who know something of the
tardships attendant upon a stampede,
s probably more rigorous than the
vind swept reaches surrounding Cape
'Jome.
The Barrens at Cold Bay offer no
helter against the sweep of the wind,
md the absence of fuel, save beach
vood and paraflne, will add to the sufering
of the prospectors who plan co
nvade the country.
The uninviting prospect, however,
vill not hold back the adventurers, for
11 ready the regular steamers and
aunches plying between Seward and
\odiak are booked to capacity weeks
ihead. Of these the men entering
fron? Alaska will have the advantage
>f being outfitted for an indefinite
lay and already hardened to the rigors
of the northern winter. ?
Rival interests have been shipping"
umber and supplies into the district
ior some time and the erection of
uushroom towns is expected to soon
ake place at several designated
mints. Many of the promoters, acrording
to those on the ground, arc
lierely there to make their stake out
f the general conditions surrounding
Lhe boom. Of the others who are
joining the rush, some are only going
n for the adventure while a few will
icriously attempt the exploitation of
die resources presumed to be there.
I he announcement has served to stimulate
interest in other parts of the.
territory and efforts are being made
to attract attention to discoveries
made in the Anchorage and Susitna
valleys.
Simplified Form of Worship
Being Tried in Russia
Moscow, Oct. 2.?The people of
Moscow are today wandering curiousy
from one church to another on
Sundays, seeking to decide which
>rand of the two new kinds of similified
services pleases them the
nost. They have been accustomed !>y
xperience and ancestry to the elaborate
rites of the orthodox church,
vhich virtually monopolized re
igion mrougnoui me country in ibc
Id (lays, and now that this has be.n
aken away from them, they hardly
now which way to turn.
As a result of the trials of church
ten for opposing the government's
equisition of church treasures, Patrireh
Tikhon was dethroned and the
hurch reorganized. Thereupon,
owever, two new sects developed,
irrhbishop Antonin, leader of th
novement to oust Tikhon and work in
armony wkh the Soviet regime, was
elected as Metropolitan of Moscow
y the "Life Church" conclave, but
iter he disagreed with others in his
wn organization and formed a new
:roup pledged to work for the
Church of Regeneration."
Through government superv sion a
erious conflict was avoided and Motopolitan
Antonin remains in office,
ut, nevertheless, in his church an enirely
different service is held than in
he "New Life" churches. In the
itter only a few changes have been
lade from the old orthodox services,
hiie Antonin has gone in for simlicity.
He has dismissed his choi's
one away with the secret altars, and
oh's his services in the Russian,
rt*-t ?* ? sv Itfltil/v in tUn A i
>> iinir ai<iiiuiiiK in iuc uuuuiu
f the church. The congregation doe3
1! the singing.
The Moscow churches today have
irger congregations than for many
ears past. Hundreds of priests also
>ve come to the capital from the
rovinces to learn what is really gov
on in the matter of church reorm.
he Soviet government is undT
tood to have taken the position that
does not care how many particular
Drms of worship develop, but that
will not permit a serious conflict in
!ie governing body of the churches
s a whole. Both groups are to have
epresentatives upon the governing
oard.
'otato Curing House Erected
Prosperity, Oct. 2. ? A modern and
cientific potato-curing house has
een erected by the Farmers Cooper,iive
association. The house has tne
it parity 01 n,zuu Dusneis. ine Douy
f the building is of frame structure
nth fireproof specifications for the
oof. All walls are specially designed
> meet the requirements of the buildig
is of frame structure with fireroof
specifications for the roof. All
'alls are specially designed to meet
he requirements of the building.
This is an important move of this
>ca! organization to aid farmers in
he production and marketing of farm
roducts. There seems to be little
oubt that potato-growing will ocupy
an important plnce in the future
gricultural operations in this section.
-Newberry Observer.
far of follnn I out
Newberry, Oct. 2.?A Are at Jalapa,
even miles north of Newberry, on
he C., N. & L. railroad, destroyed a
ar with 45 bales of cotton, damaged
wo empty coal cars and destroyed the
ross ties for 50 yards or more. It is
ot known how the Are started. The
n'ap i ginnery came near going, but
ard work saved it.
The Order of Railway Telegraphrs
will establish in St. Louis a munal
bank capitalized at $500,000.
_ !!_ I . 1 . J . .
Or^Miii* Hoflntf CattvwMiB 4
At a recent meeting hald in th? J
city of Union by a repraaentativc J
body of th# lauding ahunsh people 1
both of Union and Union county, 4
plans Ware launched to organise a 4
sing-inn aonvantion for Union county 2
in ^hk-h aaoh and avary individual in J
the county, who might be interested, .
is asked to take part.
The purpose of the convention is to ^
promote better singing and a mor? a'
congenial fellowship between the pec- ?
pie throughout Union and Union j
county, and it is hoped that each und .
every one will respond to the call
and make the convention a success. ^
No denominational lines will be 4
orawn and each and every church and <j
Sunday school in the county is asked
to cooperate regardless of denomina- .
t:on, and each pastor and Sunday
school superintendent is requested ?o ^
announce the meeting and lay special 4
stress upon the importance of each 4
church sending a representative body. 4
The first meeting will be held in the 4
court house nt Union 011 Sunday, October
8th, 1922 (second Sunday) from *
3 until 5 o'clock,-p. m. The conven- 4
tion is to be purely a religious affair ?
and th_? singing of old time hymns will ^
be the principal feature. 4
Hoping that each church will realize
the importance of this convention
and will give its hearty support, we 4
are, Very respectfully, 4
J. C. Mitchell, 4
R. F. Cogburn, J
C. C. Sanders,
(Committee.
?
Tokio Wages Going Down (
4
Tokio, Oct. 2.?Investigations made 4
by the Tokio chamber of commerce .
show that wages of general laborers
in Tokio are on a downward course. 4
Of the 50 classes of work, 10 regis- 4
| tered a drop in August and 32 remain- 4
ed unchanged from last month. The 4
average index number for the current 4
month indicates a decrease by one pCy
rent over the preceding month, ul- <
though it is 10 per cent higher than ^
the figure recorded for the corre- i
sponding period of 1920. m
Among* the works that scored a
drop in wages are cement making,
blacksmithing, glass manufacturing
and drug producing, while spinning,
bricklaying and printing registered a
slight appreciation.
Coty's Extracts
(Imported Perfume)
Purse size, each . . . . 25c
STORM'S DRUG STORE
Phone 76
You Will Find
Red Goose Shoes
AT
AUSTELL'S SHOE STORE
HARRIS-WOODWARD CO.
Good Things to Eat.
We have red, white and yellow
onion sets. Get yours before they
are all prone. Now is the time t?>
set for spring onions.
The Only Big Circus Coming
To Union This Year!
CIRCUS PRICES
All CHILDREN qn?
"LL UNDER AGE OF 12 UUU
#
ADULTS 75c (includ'ng war tax).
CIRCUS 1
I PRESENTING ON ONE STUPENDOUS I
1 PROGRAM AND FOR THE FIRST TIME ?
A IN ALL CIRCUS HISTORY M
Jt NOT MANY, BUT ALL THE M
fSk. WORLD'S GREATEST
ARE NIC
STARS
UNION
2?PERFORMANCES?2
Street Parade 10:30 a. m.
THURSDAY, OCT. ;
^B ^B i^Bv
HUH
BH
HH
hb m
?? C
*
.'*
R
XOD
- ^
ivi
|
fovi
| 250 MILLION PI
| WILL YOU BE ONE (
L THE MANAGER]
\ TO YOU?IT IS VER
% MANAGEMENT TO I
\ THAN WE CAN EVE!
f THAN?
f HUMORESQl
r
t SHOWS: 2-46I
^?^jj
I (35*
j 3a
l^wnwiiirBwr
WIL1
AcGraw Forced to Buy j i
His Pennant Winner* J
New York, Oct. 2.?In late years 1
lanager John J. McGraw of the
Hants has aUnost ceased to develop
oung ball players, and due somewhat
o the local competition of the Yanecs
for the . city's patronage, has 1
een forced more and more to go into 1
he marts an4 buy his pennant Winers
with the coin of the realm.
McGraw haa developed marvellous '
layers and Imm combined tj}$m cfectively
in ? time but of the present i
earn only fir of those who can be ?
lassified ^regulars" received their i
?
nr a:
AY AND
As the
IK Ti
EOPLE WILL SEE THI!
)F THEM?
IENT OF THE RIALTO
if RARE THAT A PICT 1
TS PATRONS, YOU Mi
I CLAIM IT TO RF.. W1
IE,' 'THE MIRACLE
8-10
|f "|y
I Fashio
Hi r
g* /? J
Bgr
W2
* creations.
millinery t
They are
^ Baltimore3
BURN PR
tutelage from John J. The others were
bought or traded from other major
league clubs or picked up as virtually
finished products from the minors.
Of the first string pitchers Arthur
Nehf and Jess Barnes, veterans of
last year's series, and Hugh McQuillan,
were obtained from Boston.
Catcher Frank Snyder was taken
from St. Louis several years ago.
Earl Smith made a record in the International
League but he bears the
trademark of a McGraw product.
At first base George Kelly learned
most of what he knows from McGraw,
eis did Frisch, the regular second base,
man. At shortstop Captain Davy Ban>
* * .
Lt(
TOMORRC
;
Mother
\ - ' ^
HE Hi
#
>, THE SWEETEST ST01
?*. USWfcdL Jfc&J&JS; J
THEATRE GUARANTE1
JRE IS GUARANTEED
VY BE SURETHAT THIS
SAY THAT IT IS AS G(
MAN' OR THE 0
PRICES: ADULTS, 4
A^A A^A A^A
w*5 Latest Di
4
rhis Showing
*
3HERY of effect and charming i
ty are features of all "Lady <&
The designs shown here were the <
ittraction at the Baltimore Fashioi
part of our display of esdustv
" designs, which includes this seasoi
materials, shapes and color effects
^ *
* >
)
i
' *
Y GOODS
i i : ~
crort came from Philadelphia and a<
third base, Heine Groh, once of lh<
Ginnta, has spent too much time ir
Cincinnati to be included among th?
home-grown.
Nor is McGraw's record bolstered
by the insertion of Johnny Rawlins
into the infield. He has been ther<
much of the summer, due to the eeriei
of injuries to Groh. Priach has gon<
from second to third and Rawlingi
has subbed at second, but, like hii
mate at shortstop, Rawlings caim
from the Quakers.
In the outfield only Ross Young if
considered a McGrawite. "Irish'
Meusel came with .the troop from ihn
... . - .a %? . f r ,' Hf
3 | '
w |
'P I
I
Y
-i
ILL"
RY EVER TOLD? |
L?ftn .&?; i,/,^>,"(;i'iiiiaBiii ?
S THIS PICTURE I
BY A THEATRE ?
PICTURE IS MORE 1
X)D AND BETTER f
W
LD NEST' I
Oc; CHILDREN 20c |
1
. li
ictates i; *
of I
!
2
i
I
5
hdividu- ?3
iltimore" P
center of . H
ti Show. P
e "Lady ,L .
n's latest g
Kj
l CO.
t Quaker City, as ^id Casey Stengel,
s The quartet of men that McGraw
i trained who are on the team, however,
} are near to the top of the league at
their poeitkras.
,
racking
MWtitrvoizs hsaJache
I MENtSOLATUM 1
V chafes it. way. jf
^ ? I Ml
> SnbMtilM to Tlo Union Doily Tint

xml | txt