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The Brattleboro daily reformer. (Brattleboro, Vt.) 1913-1955, January 17, 1921, Image 3

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THE BllATTLEBOIlO DAILY REFORMER. MONDAY, JANUARY 17, 1921.
Million Dollar Co.
!
Will Market Tanlac
Throughout World
Business Has Grown from Small Beginning Six Years
Ago Until Now It Is One of the Largest in the
World With Big Foreign Demand
By HARRISON VAUGHN.
ATLANTA, Ga.. January 17. An
nouncement has just been made here of
the organization of tbc International Pro
prietaries. Inc.. to take over the business
heretofore conducted by G. F. Willis. In
ternational Distributor of Tanlac, and
the Willis-McDuffie Company. Eastern
Distributors, of this city.
The new Company has a paid-in capital
of One Million Dollars and is one of the
largest proprietary medicine concerns in
the world. The business of the corpora
tion will he conducted by the present man
agement, which owns the entire capital
stock. It is understood that no part of
the stock will be offered to the public.
The officers of the company are: G. F.
Willis, President; P. C. MeDuffic, Vice
President; .1. '. Goodson. Secretary.
Mr. Willis is a prominent Atlanta busi
ness man and is a well-known figure in
the drug and advertising field in both the
I'nited States and Canada. I'nder the di
rection of Mr. Willis, the founder of the
business, it has attained its present posi
tion in the very front rank of the country's
proprietary medicine industries.
Mr. McDuffie. who has been a big factor
with Mr. "Willis in building up the business
in the past five years, is a leading Atlanta
citizen and business man. and is widely
known to the drug trade throughout the
country.
The new Company, which is the logical
outcome of the rapid growth and expan
sion of the business, will market a number
of internationally advertised and interna
tionally sold proprietary and pharmaceu
tal products, including Tonics. Aspirin
Tablets, Cold Specifics. Laxative Tablets,
etc.
SALE UNPRECEDENTED.
Tanlac. their principal product. .s prob
ably the most extensively advertised and
the most largely sold proprietary medicine
of its kind in the world, approximately
SIIII'O
20.000.000 bottles having been sold
its introduction six years ago.
An instance of the rapid growth and
development of the business with Atlanta
as principal headquarters is the statement
that its products are now advertised i:i
more than seven thousand newspapers in
the United States and Canada, and that
the advertising appropriation for this
year will be in excess of One Million Dol
lars. The success and permanency of the
business is assured from the fact that it
has shown a rapid and substantial in
crease -i each year since its organization,
and the further fact that the busincs: for
the year just past shows an increase of
approximately SO per cent over the pre
ceding year.
RIG FOREIGN DEMAND.
To supply the demand for Tanlac it ha
been necessary to erect two great m dern
Laboratories one at Iatm. Ohi . and
the other at Walkerville, Canada. These
Laboratories represent the last word in
modern construction ami lab ratory
equipment. The two plants have a com
bined floor space of approximately 70,000
square feet, with a combined daily capac
ity of 0O.0OO bottles. Tanlac. which is a
medicine of recognized therapeutic value
and unquestioned merit, is now sold in
practically every city, town and hamlet
throughout the United States and Canada.
In fact, it is a household word throughout
America.
The new Company will not only under
take the further expansion of the 'business
in foreign countries, where there is a
steadily increasing demand, but contem
plates acquiring at an early date addi
tional manufacturing facilities in this
country and Canada. The Compuny is
doing an animal business of fr.tm S.1 (MHt -0X
to SO.oOtUHNt with an annual pav-roil
of approximately S2.'0.0i Ml. The execu
tives aiTd sales r.fhces occupy m re than
an entire floor of the Fourth National
Rank Iiuilding in this citv. Adv.
CONCERT AND DANCE FESTIVAL HALL
FERDINAND O'S
MARINE ORCHESTRA
Wednesday, January 19
Auspices of Business & Professional Women's Club
Concert 8 to 9 Dancing 9 to 1
5!
The Rutenber
Range
The Domanco
Iron
The Star Dish Washer
will hold a complete set of dishes with the accompanying
glass and silver.
It washes, rinses and dries without moving a dish.
The most delicate china cannot be broken in this type of
washer.
HORTON D. WALKER
The Torrington
Sweeper
The A. B. C.
Washer
98
Every one a good one
These are arctics you can depend on
44 RslLRanH " Arrnrs with the P cri Rnll
Trade Mark. Well-made, easy-
firrino-. lon - wearing and com-
1-, j r?
fortable. Every man needs a
pair or gooa arctics. s:
t 7
ij.hu I..HIH w z ui.i mi t nil ii imwwu.iipMfw .M m. h im i. inn-m tv.n, I. mmw mv
, ... .iimn m mil in i ..n inn ml ir r iir i f A bfm i . - rrmMwmmmur if n i ninii.n. .mil...
'a
The 'Ball-Band" special vacuum proc
ess by which the rubber is forced into
the fabric gives the additional endurance
for which "Ball-Band" Rubber Footw ear
is famous. Make your choice of styles.
Dunham Brothers Co.
For Quick Results Try The Reformer
VIEWS OF HUGHES
ON THE LEAGUE
Sufficiently, Broad to Suit
Both Factions in
the Senate
WILL NOT HAMPER
HIM AS SECRETARY
SEEING THINGS
sssEsaxrA
Could Consistently Ask Foreign Nations
to Join New Organization for Prevent
ing War or Suggest Mrdifications of
Present League.
By DAVID LAWRENCE..
( S j .ctiul Despatch To Tlie Reformer.)
, Copyright 1921. j
WASHINGTON. Jan. 17.-The practi-j
cal centainty that Charles Evans Hughes
will lie secretary of state in the Hardin?
cabinet hn.s led some members of the t-en-atc
in the last few days to take a retro
spective sluice at the views of the former
associate justice, not his views on legal
or political (iiiestioiis, hut his utterances
on foreign policy, which, during the cam
paign had a 'passing value hut which now
will become the basis of American action,
after .March 4.
"It should be i emcmbered," wrote Mr.
Hughes on one occasion, '"that the great
protection against war for a considerable
pciiod of years will be found Hot, in any
toiin of words, that may now be adopted,
however desirable these mav be. but in
economic conditions, which are an assur-i
aiice that for a considerable time at least,
we shall not have a recurrence of world
st: tie. "The danger now lies,"' he added,
'"not in the menace of force employed
to, fiuther imperial designs, hut in the!
disorder due to a break up and the re
moval (it traditional restraints and the
tendency to revolution within states. In
making committments it should lie remem-!
lured that while it is highly important'
that at this time we should realize that'
it is iii aet K-able to promote peace and se-!
cure stabli conditions we should be cau-j
turns hi t'l.-diina promises which are to be
reduced in unknown contingencies.''
otne ot the main points in Mr.
Hughes's criticism of the present cove
r.aiu o; the league of nations are as fol
lows: (1,1 Omitting the guarantee in Aiticle
l'i.
(2i SuitulnV limitation as to the field
of the league's ino'tiries and action so
as to leave no d mot that internal con-
LtTTLE INTHE
BIRO HT t
Mass., Monday, Jan. 24. at 11 o'clock
a. m. After the transaction of regular
business, the meeting will lie addressed
by Arthur W. GilWrt of Doston. com
missioner f agriculture, who has ac
cepted an invitation to be present. An
invitation also has been extended to W.
It. Drown of Berlin. N. II.. the largest
breeder and owner of Arabian horses in
the I'nited States, who will give an in
teresting talk on The Imiorting and
breeding of the Arabian Horse.
William II. Gooher. secretary of the
National Trotting association, and J.,.
II. Ilealy. secretary of the Connecticut
state board of agriculture, and others
interested in the breeding and develop
ment of the trotting horse, and the suc
cess of our agricultural fairs, will be
present ami address the meeting.
President Hall extends an invitation
to all those present. to be his guests at
a dinner to be given at Hotel Worthy at
1 o'clock p. m.. when intermission will
be declared and business resumed at
the t'lose of dinner. This should be one
of the most important and successful
meetings ever held by the association, as
there are many questions to Im discussed,
and the prosects are that the year 1021
will be the banner year for fair meet-
j nigs.
I
RAILROAD PROPERTY
IN STATE APPRAISED
Boston & Maine IJnes in Vermont Are
(iiven a Valuation of $12.158,000
Local Trolley IJne $10,000.
MOXTPKLIEIt. Jan. 17. Melvin i.
Morse, tax commissioner, has filed the fol
lowing schedule showing the appraisal of
railroad properties in the state, as of Dec.
31, 1!)1S. and 1020. respectively:
IMS 1020
ENGLAND FACES
HOUSE SHORTAGE
cerns
tariff
! c;i
diall
any
(t States MH
laws are not
I'lovision t
toquivo bv c
ther v. ay, ;;
h as immigration and 1
cmhiaccd. j
:at l. i lorcign power J
msont . pui chase or in j
v possessions on the
Amei ican continent
cent theieto.
ol
the
the
islands adja-
.f
an meniiier oi tiie',l,l
at its pleasure on
a
(41 Provision that the settlement
purely American iUstions shall be l
unite. t primarily to the .'vnicnean nations, j
and that European nations shall not inter-j
vene unless leqtiestcd to do so by the'
American nations )
I5( Provision that no member of the
league shall be constituted a mandatory
without it's oiw-nt and no' European or
.Asiatic power .-hall be constituted a man
datory oi any American people.
(Oi Explicit provision that unanimous
agreement or decision is reqaireil.
( 7 1 Provision that
league may withdraw
specified notice.
Sneaking particularly ci Article 10 Mr.
Hughes said he regarded the guarantee in
Article ten as "a trouble breeder and not
a peace-maker." He declared that he be
lieved it to be "unnecessary and unwise"
and that "there is little ground to suit
pose that it will prevent, war on the con
traiy. it is likely to move iilusionary and
to create disappointment and a sense of
injury and injustice on the part of those
who are led to place confidence in it."
Here is the nataciaph, however, which
makes it possible for Mr. Hughes to ap
proach the Harding campaign view of the
league issue and his own early inclinatio is
toward modification of the present cove
nant of the league: ''I think that it is
:i fallacv to sunnose that helnfnl coopera
tion in the future will be assured by the
attempted compulsion ot an inilcxil'le rule.
Eat her will such cooperation depend
upoti the fostering of linn friendships,
springing from an appreciation of com
munity of ideals, interests and purposes,
and such friendships 'are more likely to
be promoted bv freedom of conference,
than by the effort to create hard and fast
engagements."'
. The foregoing is . sufficiently broad to
permit Mr. Hughes to decide eventually
that freedom of justice without obligation
or committment can be obtained by so.
modifing the covenant as to leave Amer
ica a free hand in every thing yet permit
ting her to sjt as a memner of an organi
zation which is already in operation: or
it mav permit Mr. Hughes to ask other na
tions in the league to join a new associa
tion which has much less specific powers
than the present, league and one that is
Mattel tied after the Hague conferences.
The selection of Mr. Hughes as secre
tary of state is due largely to the fact that
his lecord is general enough and his ut
terances broad enough to give him a free
hand in faking advantage of such -machinery
for international, cooperation as
is already i'i existence or in the setting up
of new 'processes fitted to the campaign
pledges of American freedom of action, in
all international affairs. One thing is
sure neither the I.ode teservationists
pot- the iirecoiicilablcs can claim that Mr.
Hughes's words make it impossible for
him to accent their point of view and
there are plenty of middle-of-the-road
senator who think the Ilmdies mind
will produce a compromise. They expect
him to lead the partv out of the wilder
ness of dissension and turn the thought
and abilitv of the iarty to a solntio i of
the acute business and economic problems
of reconstruction.
Estimated That 1.000,000 Are Needed
in the I nited Kingdom Spending
Big Sums to Build Them.
LONDON. Jan. 17. It is estimated
that London is short of 1."o,hm house's
and Premier Lloyd (Jeorge. speaking in
the house of commons, has placed the to
tal house shortage for the whole of the
I'nited Kingdom at roughly l.tMMl.nOO. .
A house for rent notice board in Ivondon !
quickly attracts a crowd.
j Housing is a department f the min-
istry of healtli. and. by legislative net.
hual authorities" are required to submit
( h'.msiiig- M-hem Thosnnds of scheme
have been submitted, but progress has
been very slow.
Perhaps the chief reason for this has
been the economic factor. Houses which
three or four times as much to
build as before the war. cannot obviously
let or sell at pre-war figures.
Nevertheless, according to govern
ment statistics Mime (Ki.tM Ml new houses
were started in 1020 and the number
contracted for has risen during the year
from 10.40 to l.Tk.'iM.
One striking feature of the effort to
provide hous-s is a housing scheme con
ducted by the office of works, which was
empowered to spend (!.(MH.(MK) jiounds
spread over IS months. Its operations
started in Cainberwell. a south .London
borough. An arrangement was made by
which the office of works supplied the
plans, material and supervision, while
the local federation of trades unions
supplied the labor ami the borough coun
cil assumed responsibility for the fin
ances, llictplan worked smoothly and
louses were built for "SO imiuthIs apiece.
saving of nt least 2m pounds, making
total saving to taxpayers of PtfMMHI
Bane & Mont.
Trac. & P. Co...
B. F. & Sextons
River St. U. It.
Berk. St. II. 11
.Boston & Maine
I B. 11
P.ristol II. U
Burlington Trac.
Burlington Trac.
. "o. & Trans.
lines
'Can. Pac. 11. 11...
v. u. n
jChamplain Trans.
I Co
('. &P. H. li. Co...
Dcerfield Hirer
K. 11
D. & II. It. It. ...
flrand Trunk It. It.
Co. of (in
illardwick & Wood-
.$130,000 $lo0.000
40.0O0
27o.(MK
2,1.-.000
:?..( Hto
40.000 .
'7o,0tK !
12,lS.-).000 :
40.0O0
HUNTRESS-ADAMS
CO
Our Semi-Annual
Clearance
Sale
Which started off with a rush, will continue
through the month of January.
i
There Are Thousands of Dollars'
Worth of Merchandise
lo Be Sold
but
as lots and selections grow smaller every
day we suggest that you come early
FEW MORE COLUMBIA RECORDS
TO BE CLOSED OUT AT 69
3S.-i.000 42.1.000 .
1.-..-..000
IMo.lMM)
11,03S,MK
ntto.ooo
3 Kt.tKMJ
SO.000
i.roo.ooo
101.000
l.tMHI.IKMI
ll.013.0OO
noo.ooo
3o0.000
-.. : 80.000 :
1 ,(500,000
1.40.-.7iO 1,000.000'
a
a
pounds. Thitf scheme mav iK'come the
embt.vo of a state building department.
The financial difficulties connected
with the housing problem have been re
sponsible for the creation by local au
thorities of interest bearing "housing
bonds" which are in some localities a
fairly iopular investment.
In the north of I'ngland.. concrete
houses have become jxipular, as machin
ery hugely replaces man-power in their
erection. In some parts of Iondon. too.
such houses have been built recently,
owing to the shortage of bricks', the high
rate of wages and other difficulties.
Bit; KEDITTIONS IN VALVE.
an
- "V - W X.W L I IDC! S1 X
Annual Meeting to B Held in Spring- jv'i :;:
Corn Viclded Farmers But $20.93
Acre on Basis of Dec. 1 Trices.
WASHINGTON. Jan. 17. Corn, king
of crops, produced an average of only
20.03 an acre to farmers based on Dw.
3 farm prices, while hops produced $4S(.10
an acre, according to averages for the
country as a whole issued by the depart
ment of agi iculture. The value per acre
of hops in 1010 was $s74.7.". while corn's
average value per acre was S3S.40. With
the exception of rye. cranberries, soy
beans and orghum sirup the average
value per acre last year showed heavy re
ductions fiop 1010 because of the declines
in prices.
Wide variation is shown in the value
per acres of the various crops, while the
averages for different states .show a broad
ange for each crop. The average farm
value per acre of the iniKrtant farm
crops as estimated by the department of
agriculture for last year and fof 1010 follows:.-
i
burvlt.lt 140.000 14O.0O0
Steamboat "Yioco" l.OOO l.OOO
Hons. Tun. Ac Wil.
It. 11 1N.",000 200.000
Man. Dor. & (Jran.
K. It 20.000 20 .Otto
Midland It. It. ... 10.SOO 1.1.OO0
.Military Post St.
It. It 200.000 21.-.000
Mt. Mans. Flee.
ll. ii. .".o.ooa ::o.oo!
Me. Con. It. It -JoJ.ofMt .-.-.O.OOO
But. It. It ll.102.tMtO 11.102.HO
Rut. It. L, & P. Co. . 72.tH ; lOi.IifMl,
But. It. L. & P. ,
Co. V Trans.
lines 341,0!M 227.300
St. Al. & Swan.
Trac. Co tiO.lMK) C.O.0O0
St. .1. & Lake C.
11. It 1.22I.OOO 1.22t.fH0
Spring. F. It. It.. 12".tHM 125.000
Twin State Jas &
Fie.'. Co 40.0O0 40.00O
vt. Valley it. it. 3.c,oo.kh :.r,oo;o
White Itiver It. 11. lOO.OOO Km.iHtO
Woodstock It. It.. 2.-UX0 2."0,tM)0
Sailor Superstitions.
A seaman's superstition is that a
penknife stuck into the mnst of a
sailing vessel Is supposed to bring
wind. Pr the same reason a sailor
will whistle through his teeth.
How to Choose Your Drug Store
Select your drug store with the care that you select
your doctor.
Choose that drug store that puts every transaction be
tween itself and its customers on a SERVICE basis.
Trade at the drug store that pays more attention to
making a CUSTOMER than to making a sale.
Trade at the drug store where you can be SURE that
you are getting the most and the BEST for your money.
Trade at the drug store where you can "feel at home,"
Where you can feel at liberty to make use of all the re
sources a REAL drug store PECULIARLY has for your,
help, convenience and accommodations.
It is this kind of a drug store that we take pride in
running. ' '
The relations between a druggist and his customers
arc akin to those between a doctor and his patients.
The moment a druggist forgets this fact he ceases to
be a real druggist.
We want you to make use of all the advantages our
Service holds out to you.
We are always ready to refund your money without
question or quibble on any purchase you may make here
that is not perfectly satisfactory to you in every respect.
Brat tleboro Drug Co.
The Prescription Store
Thone 560 104 Main Street
field, Mass.. Next Week Monday. ,
SOUTHRRIDCJK, Mass.. Jan. 17.
action of any other business will he
held at Hotel Worthy. Springfield.
The annual meeting of the New Eng
land Agricultural Fairs association for
the election of officers and for the train-
in
I
k Vv
KEMPSBALSAM
WillStopthat Couch
j onnct
Potatoes
Sweet M)tatoes .
Sorghum sirup .
Soy . beans
Rice .........
Peanuts
I 'cans ... ......
Hay r.... ':
Cotton . . ;
P.uckwheat
Crain sorghums
i Winter wheat . .
P.room corn . . .
Cowpeas ,
( 'lover seed . .". .
Corn
Parley
I Rye
i tats
Spring wheat . .
CUARANTEEO
1020
$4X0.10
213.37
lax.o:;
127..-.1
1H5.71
07..-.0 y.
4X.42',
47.7.",
3S.0.S
31.04
27.S7 -2."..
14
24.41
24.30
22.S3
21.40
21.25
21.2.",
20.03
17.5N '
17..-7
10.01
1 4.0.X
1010
$x74.7.",
1S4.ini
2oo.rs
.I4.r,s
13.i.03
5(0.03
4X.74
104.,-,.-,
;.-,. kj
30.03
32.04
00.02
30.31.
32..X0
31.33
20.72
17.K0
42.10
::x.40
27.13
1 U.4S
21.04
20.3X
Have F?Jth in Cross of Honey.
On the island of Uho.'e.s the lius
Iiand traces a cross in p,.-ev over the
door before his new hrme-enrrrs- the
liouse, nnl Ihi lit I lc operation is raid
to guarantee their eternal happiness.
th ill
C A D I L,
Be
A C
where he may, or
where he will, the Cadillac
owner is the object of
constant enyy, because he
is immune even from ap
prehension of things that
would mar his enjoyment.
On Exhibition in Corner Store of Barb2r Building-
This Week
Mohawk
Cadillac Company
Greenfield, Mass.
.IV t

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