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The Brattleboro daily reformer. (Brattleboro, Vt.) 1913-1955, May 21, 1921, Image 5

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THE BRATTLEBORO DAILY REFORMER? SATURDAY MAY 21M921,
5
r
Urges Farmers to Hold
Surplus Crops Over Haivest
Professor Says Large Yields
This Year Are Improbable
Farm Panic Serious
RUBLTXGTOX, May 2B Professor
i. P. . Warren, head of the department
of farm economics and farm manage
ment of New York State College of Ag
riculture, at Cornell university, issues
the following statement regarding the
present agricultural situation :
i am asKcu ior a statement concern
ing farm practice to meet the present
situation. . "s
"Wesare passing throdgh the most se
rious agricultural panic thathas ever
occurred. The Jtroduct of an acre of
cotton, if sold this year, will buy ("l per
cent of the quantity of general commodi
ties that the product of an acre of cot
ton would have bought as a live-year
average before the war. Iiecords are
available for 4.i years and in only one
year, 18!)4, would the product of an
acre of cotton buy so little. In making
these calculations, the general price level
used is the price level of 'all commodi
ties' of the bureau of labor, , and the
value of the cotton crop er acre as
given by the Monthly Crop Reporter.
Corn Buys Little.
"In spite of the large yield per acre,
the product of an acre of coriN if sold
this year, could be exchanged for only
73 per cent of the average quantity of
other commodities that an acre of corn
would have bought as a live-year aver
age before the war. This is the lowest
in 20 years. If the calculations are made
on the value of corn per bushel without
giving consideration to the large yjcMi
this year, we iind that a bushel of corn
would bring the -farmer a purchasing
power of (() per cent as much as the av
erage for the live years before the war.
This is the lowest since iS'.Hi. Even
that year it stood at T4 per cent, so that
cheap as corn was at that time, a bushel
could be exchanged for almost as much
general commodities as can be bought
with a bushel of corn today.
'The product of an average acre of
wheat in the Tinted States, last year,
would buy SI per cent as much as the
average,--acre of wheat would buy for
rive years before the war. This is the
lowest in !.'( years.
'"The product of an average acre of
oats, lust year, would buy 74 per cent
of the usual quantity of other things,
which is the lowest since ls!M. Or if
we consider the price of oats, omitting
the consideration of yield per acre, a
bushel of oats would buy : per cent of
the usual quantity of other things, which
is the lowest, in ."" years.
Worst Panic Ever.
'Such facts a the aliovc completely
dominate the agricultural situation. We
WEST BRATTLEBORO
Miss Elizabeth Sargent, who has been
at her "liome a week on account of illness,
is out again.
Miss-Evelyn Metcalf went Thursday
evening to Springfield and Wcstlield,
Mass.. for a few days' stay.
Prof. E. A. T.utterfield, who had been
hoarding at Pmle Stockwell's, has taken
an' apartment in the Barber building.
Mr. and Mrs. Bichard Ealiose and
family are moving from the Trotter farm,
which they have occupied two years, to
the farm in Marlboro owned by Hubert
Johnson of Brattleboro.
Miss Emmerette Weatherhead is mov
ing to the Grant house, which she recently
bought. Mr. and Mrs. George A. Hough
ton, who are now occupying part of the
house, will move next week to the Greene
house on Brook street.
Mr. anil Mrs. Alva Stacy have sold
their farm in this village to Jacob Eaible
of Freeport. 111., wlio will move there.
Mr. Stacy and family will move to the
Frank Bichardson farm, where they will
work for Mr. Bichardson.
CHURCH NOTICES.
Unitarian church. I tew
i
:. q. s. o-
parish house
Subject of
All are wel-
Bev. E. S.
good pastor. Service in the
Sunday morning at 10."0.
pennon, Waysides Shrines,
come.
Advent Christian church,
Hewitt pastor. Morning worship at 10.4.1.
Subject As It Was So Shall It Be. Bible
school at I"-'. Loyal. Workers at p. m.
DeWeese P. DcWitt will address this
meeting. Song service at 7.1.". led by E.
F. Colton. Evening service at 7.'!. Sub
ject, A Definite lurpose. Midweek'
prayer meeting Thursday evening at 7.110.
Swedish Lutheran church. Ilev. Oscar
Cassling pastor. Sunday services at 10. "0
a. m. by Deacon E. Wennersten. Sunday
school .at 12. The pastor will preach in
Schenectady and Pittstield next Sunday.
Luther League meeting Thursday at S p.
m. Friday. May 27. a musical program
will be rendered at 8 p. m., followed by
refreshments which will be served by the
Ladhix' Aid society. An admission fee
will be charged. All are cordially invited
to all services and meetings.
SOUTH VERNON.
Iv C. Allen is building a garage.
George nice of Suffiield. Com., was a
week end guest at E. 1. Edson's.
A. A. Dunklee attended a Farm Bu
reau meeting in Burlington Saturday.
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Tyler of IIol
yoke were guests of Mrs. Ella Beers la$
week. "
Bev; and Mrs. M. M. Adams of Boston
are vilsiting Ins mother, Mrs. Adams, at
the Home.
Mrsi W. L. White went Monday to at
tend tiie funeral of her father, Mr. Wis
wall in. Keene.
Bayinond Dresser and Margaret Thorn-
Bring
Your
P
tions
rescn
Here
If yon want them filled with the purest
and freshest drugs, and with the great
est care and accuracy filled precisely
as yonr physician orders them filled, to
produce the exact effect he desires.
We are proud of the record we hare
made in our prescription department.
And yet we fill prescriptions at very
reasonable prices, and fill them quickly,
too. J
C. .Thomas , PJu G,
passing through the worst panic that
ever occurred, but agriculture is bav
a panic on top of a panic, for the
nig
disc
rcnanev between agriculture and
utlipr thin !" i a nanic in itself,
"In the countries of Europe the index
numbers of prices -show that food prices
are not low. In some countries, as Ger
many, the food price is higher than the
general price level. The general panic
is world-wide, but the superimposed ag
ricultural panic is centered in the
United States. Other food-exporting
countries are somewhat similarly af
fected. World's Supply Not Excessive.
: "Under these circumstances that have
never before occurred what should the
fanner do? My judgment is that the
world's supply of food products is not
excessive if the food were located where
it is needed. Of course, it is very unlike
ly that .such a favorable season will oc
cur again. The yield per acre, last year,
for the six grain crops was i: per cent
above the average. It seems, therefore,
that the individual farmer should go
ahead with his farming operations, as
near to the normal as he can considering
the credit system. Of course, he will go
slow in new ventures, and some of the
land which normally fails to pay ordi
narv farm wages to the farm operator
might well be allowed a year in which
to recuperate, unless its operation can be
conducted incidentally to the operation
of the better land.
Store Crops on Farms.
'"However, the most important single
thing for farmers to do aside from con
tinuing to work as usual is to hold on
the farms a large amount of this year's
grain "crops and other products. The
only place where such excessive crops
can be stored is" on farms. City stor
ages are spectacular, but for capacity
it is the multitude of small cribs and gran
aries that count. The l." per cent extra
crop due to weather is not to be expected
again. The farmer who holds some of
this unexpected surplus to meet the pos
sible .unexpected shortage is performing
an important public service. This serv
ice, however, is not understood by per
sons in cities, for the reason that they
do not comprehend the variability of
crops tlue to weather. One of the most
important factors that helped to prevent
Germany fnmii winning the war was the
large reserve held on farms, out of the
excessive crop of 1S)1." which made, it
possible to get through the spring of
1!17 without a food calamity for Eu
rope.
"It is always
puhlie as well as
eis that in the
food reserves be
they have been
t injes in t he past.
in the interest of the
in the interest of farm
years of bounty, large
built up on farms as
done so many. many
And in the past, thev
have
thou
tlwavs proved to be needed al
ii sometimes the carry-over had to
remain large for a second year.
as. both of Xorthfield. were married by
Bev. 1 1. E. Buff urn May 10.
Mr. and Mrs. Warren Shine of Con
cord. X. II.. visited their parents. Mr.
and Mrs. C. J. Stone, Friday and Sat
urday. Bev. B. E. Keeney will preach at J he
Advent Christian church Sunday morn
ing at 10.4.- o'clock ; Sunday school at
noon : Loyal Workers" meeting at 7
o'clock.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Kerrigan of Lex
ington spent the week-end at E. P. Ed
son's. They came to attend the christen
ing of Mr. and Mrs. Edson's infant
daughter. The ceremony took place Sun
day in the Human Catholic church at
Xorthfield.
Mr. and Mrs. E. P Edsoji gave a week
end party to a few friends and guests
Saturday evening. Music was furnished
by William 1 Ioughtaling on the violin.
.Mrs. G. F. Skillings accompanying on the
piatio. A very pleasant evening was
f pen.t ami a dainty lunch was served.
Mrs. Jay Johnson gave a party to her
little daughter. Margaret. Wednesday
from 4 to C o'clock, it being her seventh
birthday anniversary. About 0 of her
schoolmates were present. They were
entertained with music and games. A
luncheon of sandwiches, cake, including
a birthdav cake, and lemonade were
served. Miss Margaret received a good
number of remembrances from her
friends and each one who attended tho
party was given a pretty souvenir May
basket tilled with different kinds of
candy. f
WOULD STOP SLACKER LIST.
Kentucky Congressmen Introduces
Bill
Ordering Suspension.
WASIHXGTOX. May 21. A bill di
recting the war department to suspend
publication of slacker lists pending fur
ther investigation as to their correctness
was introduced yesterday by Senator
Stanley, Democrat. Kentuckv.
The
years
ostrich
old.
live to Le about ninety
1 rTllMIMIlfc MTU WW
are
has
Mi Opportunity
for a
Safe Vermont Investment
Washington Comity
5 Bonds
Tax Exempt
Free from all state and local taxes and federal
income taxes '
These bonds are issued to build a hospital
in Montpelier for Washington County
MATURITIES
$2000
12001
2000
2000
2tM0
000
due
due
due
due
due
due
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
1032,
193:5,
1931,
1535,
193B,
1937,
at
at
at
at
at
at
101.8t
101.92
102.02
102.12
102.78
Maturitffs 1932 to 193G yield 4;80 P.O.
Maturities
HARRIS, EORBES & CO:
. Incorporated
35 Federal Street, Boston
25
24
Z3
22
K 38 4
21
2o
15
umm&
t4
18
Trace four more than forty three,
See what's in the tree.
Draw from
one to two and so on to
the end.
BRATTLEBORO LOCAL
The funeral of Warren Miner, who died
Wednesday, was held yesterday in Bond
& Son's undertaking parlors. Bev. E. O.
S. Osgood, pastor of th? Unitarian church,
officiated. The burial took place in the
Miner lot in the West Halifax cemeterv.
The bearer were Warren I,. Walker. A.
D. Hoiton Charles Miner of Brattlelx.ro
and Fred Miner of West Halifax. Mrs.
Jennie Whitney of Conway, Mass., came
to attend the funeral.
Brattleboro motorists will le interested
in the following from the Keene Sentinel
regarding the oiling of roads in Cheshire
county. .Vow Hampshire: "Motorists will
do well to look out for applications of tar
or asphalt ic oils on state roads in the
county beginning next week, according to
Division Engineers Hastings and White.
The west side road south will be in poor
shape for well painted cars after Sunday
in Swanzey. Winchester and Hinsdale.
Aork in Charlestown. AValp.de and Al
stead will follow about the L'7th in Keene
and Marlboro on the south side road about
June C. and in Dublin and Pcterboro about
June S or ."
:..SI7 BUM ABKKSTS IX NEW YORK.
Police Srie Over SI
ooo.OM Worth of
Liquor .Much
of 'It
Poison.
NEW YORK. May
missioner Enright said
police had so far mailt
violations of the laws
bad confiscated liquor
21. Poll cp Com
yesterday that tin
' ."..SI 7 arrests for
sinee April 4. and
valued at l12,-
IHHI.IHHI.
" And they have saved a great many
lives in doing it." he said, "because a
i:tie part ot tnc liquor that has bee
tested has Iwcn found to be poisonous.
ne asscrteq ttiat three-quarters of the
saioous wineii were doing business a
mourn ago nave closed up because of the
rigorous enforcement of the law by the
ponce. negar.iing Attorney General
.sew ion i opinion that the police have
no rignr to stop and search automobiles,
omnnssmncr Enright said that the po-
... . ......,.,, . ,,v courr decisions
only, not by opinions of law officers. He
s.tiu uie won nl continue to stop and
s.iircn macnnies ami to follow their pres
mil iiiciuoos mi a II cases, mil I t,.,.i
by court di
... "it1-"
11 IMUII!
ADOPT TAB IFF BILL REPORT.
House Is KxiMH-ted to Soon Follow Senate
in Its Acceptance.
n.Mii.(iin., May 21. Another
s.ep umani enactment of the emergency
lonu uu, lauen yesterday with the
.oiopuoi, oi me conference report by the
.senate wiumut dehate. The house is ex
pected to act finally on the measure in the
near future.
'Plu vnln .... ,.!.....: it At m
- 'i"iUim nt i no conference
' 'r1 "r.l - ive Democrats
.V.-...HM. oi .vrizona. l'.roussard of Lou-
i.-yu.wi, ixeiiuricK ot Wyoming. Bansdcll
of Louisiana, and Sheppard of Texas,
voted for the conference agreement, and
one Kepublican, Moses of Xew Hampshire,
voted with the majority of Democrats
against the measure.
l,f li.Jft-.aJ i " iT " "JT
AND TRICES
$2000 due
2000 due
2000 due
2000 due
2000 due
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
1,
1,
1,
1,
1,
1,
193K,
1939,
1910,
1911,
1912.
at
at
at
at
at
102.S9
103.00
103.11
103.20
103.30
103.39
Feb.
2000 due Feb.
1913, at
1937 to 19H yield 4.73 P.c.
7 M
IT
35.. 2. f v . -
39 41 4f . l
9 v y
50 Years Ago
Happenings of May, 1871.
Taken from the Files of
The Phoenix
Our fire companies are out "squirt
ing" several times a week lately, pre
paratory to parade day, Saturday, May
27, wheu they expect to "squirt " a good
deal.
The Grand Army .boys are making
preparations for observing Memorial
day in an " appropriate manner. The
services promise to be of more than us
ual interest.
Bailey 'a circus and menagerie which
exhibited here on Wednesday drew
about the usual attendance, and, so far
as we observed, wa3 attended by less
than the usual amount of drunkeness
and rowdyism. i
Sparks from a passing locomotive last
Saturday set tire to 73 cords of wood be
longing to the Connecticut.. Biver rail
road, near the track below South Ver
non, when were totally consumed. The
rails for several rods were destroyed by
the heat and new iron had to be laid
before the trains could pass.
Peach and pear trees have been in
blossom for a week or more and the
apple trees an beginning to show their
colors. The Frosts which have recently
visited this section do not seem to h!lve
done serious injury.
While T. L. Johnson of Guilford, with
his one-horse team, was waiting at Es
tey's grist mill near the railroad cross
ing Tuesday' afternoon, his horse was
frightened by a passing freight train
and ran back tqward the track. Mr.
Johnson sprang to the ground, but being
unable to control his horse, his waaon
was struck by the cars and hurle.d
against a pile of railroad ties crushing
it to atoms. Mr. Johnson received some
bruises as did the horse which nar
rowly escaped being thrown under the
train.
Bev. L. J, Matteson and wife have
gone to Chicago to attend the Baptist
anniversaries, beinz instigated by their
parishioners who presented them with
a big roll of greenbacks for the purpose
of deraying expenses. They will be ab
sent two Sabbaths. The pulpit will be
supplied next Sundav by Bev. S. S.
White of Pondville.
We are glad to notice that the village
authorities have begun the adoption of
sanitary measures in the removal of the
accumulated mass of half decayed rub
bifh on the cast bank of Main street in
the rear of the stores. This bank lias
so long been a receptacle for all man
ner of uncleanness that it has become
a first clans nuisance ami we hope thor
ough work will be made of it.
The house of Bev. J. Chandler at
West ISrattleboro was entered on
Thursday evening of last week while he
and his wife were absent on an evening
visit, by a combination known as the
"Heading club." who proceeded to re
move the furniture from the parlor, tear
up the carpet and throw things into con
fusion generally. After carrying on at
a hij;h rate for something los than an
hour ther decamped. Wnerf'the pastor
and his wife, arrived ftt their home at
nine o'clock whnt was their 'surprise to
see the parlor floor covered with ft nice
new carpet, all fitted and tacked down
T-X mTTT
ri
w
omen s oumm&r
G
rea
Women's Dark Brown Kid Low Shoe
Velt sole, 18-8 heel; good quality.
Women's Black Kid Low Shoe t
Welt sole, 18-8 heel; broken sizes. '
Women's Patent Leather Low Shoe -Low
heel, welt sole; comfortable shoe.
Women's Comfort Low Shoe
Soft black kid leather, lowr rubber heel; very easy.
. . j
Young Ladies' Patent Leather Pump
Narrow' toe, low heel, light soles.
Young Ladies' Gun Metal Calf Pump . . '
Narrow' toe, low heel, light sole.
Young Ladies' Dark Brown Calf Lowr Shoe
Very low heel,' English last.
Young Ladies' Gun Metal Calf Low Shoe
Very low heel, English last. .
Young Ladies' Patent Leather Ankle Strap Pump
Low heel, English last.
Women's White Canvas Low Shoe
Medium toe, low rubber heel.
SPECIAL NOTICE
OUR SPECIAL SALE OF WOMEN'S PUMPS, TIES AND OXFORDS IS STILL GOING ON
They are going fast. Have you selected your size yet? Original values $5.00 to $6.50. All Welt Soles.
Special Price the Pair $1.98 ,
Now on display in our Women's Department.
UNHAM
and the furniture standing in the ac
customed places just as if nothing had
happened. They haven't yet got over
wondering how such a conspiracy
against the peace ant order of their
household could have been carried
through so successfully.
A shocking and f atal accident oc
curred on the 12th insti., to the six-vear-old
daughter of Judson) Goddell of West
Dover. She was spending the day with
a neighbor, Mrs. Atwoiod, an aged lady,
who gave tier a, lighted) candle .and asked
her to bring some potatoes from the
cellar. Hearing the ultle girl scream
Mrs. Atwood hastened to the cellar am
found the child's clothing on fire. She
attempted to put out the. fire but with
no effect. They were wholly consumed
and the child so badly burned that she
died in a few hours.
A little daughter of TJ. T. Corser of
Pummerston fell into a tub of hot
water and was badly scalded on May
8th, fatally it was at first feared, but
now she is thought to be doing well.
Jamaica's faithful postmaster. James
Daggett, is laid as4de from active duty
by a fall he sustained a few days since
at his office. Ilia infirmities brought on
by his service in the Union army and
the satsfaetion he gives in the duties
of his office have won for him the gen
eral regard and sympathy of the com
munity. Married in TSrattleboro, Mar 18, by
Bev. X. MighiU. Mr. Albert E. Thur
ber and Emily Ilapgood, both of Brat
tleboro. Petersburg,
licewoman. '
Va., has a colored po-
BROOKS
HOUSE
G. E. Sherman
Manage
FIRE arid LIFE
Insurance
Strong, Reliable Companies
Sanford A. Daniels
"Crosby Block, Brattleboro
A TV fl TTfcTfc nHT
9
The Family
tfy
"THE BRANDING IRON," VITAL
STORY OF MOUNTAIN GIRL
First Book by Popular Author Enacted by All Star
Cast at Goldwyn Pictures Studio
The latest Goldwyn feature produc
tion, entitled "The Branding Iron,"
is a vital story of human desires,
with a ' powerful love theme, enacted
by an all star cast which includes
Barbara Castleton, James Kirkwood,
Sydney Ainsworth, John Carver,
Bichard Tucker and Albert Roscoe.
Under the masterful direction of
JJeginald Barker, who has been re
sponsible for so many Goldwyn suc
cesses, this latest production will be
presented to motion picture audiences
throughout the world, with the as
surance that it embodies only the
best elements of the many necessary
factors of successful motion picture
.production.
THE MOUNTAIN PRISON
y
Joan is the daughter of a liquor
crazed trapper, who keeps her im
prisoned in his dilapidated hut in the
mountains of Wyoming, because he
sees in the beautiful girl a striking
resemblance to her unfaithful mother,
whom he shot in a frenzy of jealousy
twenty years prior.
One night Joan sees her opportunity
to make a dash for freedom, and
leaves the shack. In the foothills of
the mountains, Joan takes refuge in a
ranch house, where she meets Pierre,
a handsome primitive type of man,
who woos and marries her.
Pierre takes her to hislonely cabin,
where they nrc both happy, until
Joan's father discovers where she is,
and comes to warn Pierre that his
wife is so much like her mother that
he may at any time expect to find
Joan unfaithful.
BRANDED
During the absence of Pierre,
while he was on the range with
the cattle, Ilolliwell, a young preach
er, with a kindly interest in Joan,
makes frequent visits to ,the cabin
for the purpose of interesting the
crude, little girl from the backwoods,
in books. Joan delights in reading,
and upon Pierre's return tells him of
her bid for education. Pierre warns
her not to see Ilolliwell again.
Joan innocently disobeys his com
mand. Bike a" maddened ' animal
Pierre ties her to the bed post, and
with a white hot iron, which he.
TTTJ O iOrVR
Foot
H 7Tn
otv&re
a r
nee
I Any
'
1 Pair
Shoe Store
tt nan mT Trir tt iOi ri
I MJKi5 iXJU
boastfully said he used for cattle,
brands her left shoulder, utterly deaf
to her agonized screams, and blind
to the horror she expresses.
SAVED
Her cries are answered by a man
who opens the door and shoots Pierre.
The stranger advises her to come
away with him, and in going to his
bungalow, Joan faints from pain and
exhaustion. Awakening she finds
herself in a luxuriously appointed
room, furnished in Oriental fashion.
HIS LOVE DEN
Prosper Gael, a cynic and man of
the world, her rescuer, and owner of
the house, had furnished the bungalow
for another woman who had decided
not to leave her husband to live with
Prosper. Although he refuses to
marry her, Joan lives with Prosper
and is overjoyed in her new surround
ings. Believing of course that Pierre
is dead, Prosper is kind to her, and
encourages her to sing and play the
piano, stimulates her desir to read,
and makes a veritable paradise of hi
little bungalow for the girl who had
missed all the finer things of life
imprisoned in her mountain home.
THE TURNING TOIXT
But her happiness was suddenly
clouded. One' morning a small grey
envelope came for Prosper. The ar
rival of that envelope was the turning .
point in her life. It is the smaller
things that always wrought the big
gest changes. She could not read
the letter. Prosper kept it, announc
ing that he was leaving her forever.
Before leaving the house, he gives her
a sum qt money, which Joan disgust
edly turn? over to the Chinese serv
ant. HER DECISION
Imprisoned by her father, the cru
elty of her husband, the man who
educated and cultivated her all left
their impressions on- the character
of Joan. What should she do? Where
to turn to? From a distracting mass
of conflicting desires she determines
upon a course that will thrill with
its rery bravery.' ""The Branding
Iron"' comes to the Batchis theater,
commencing .Monday, May 23. Adv.
To
TT A
wear at
1
l i
t I
f
r
J
1
UIU J
ff ft'!

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