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The Brattleboro daily reformer. (Brattleboro, Vt.) 1913-1955, December 17, 1921, Image 7

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TlIE 13RATTLEBORO DAILY KEFOBMEIL SATURDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1921V
AWFUL TROUBLE
IS CONSUPMIM
Conquered by "FSUIT-A-TIVES'
The Famous Fruit Medicine
t.y
X-1
-V' :
i.
r
THE FINER POINTS IN SKIING
By
FRED II. HARRIS, BRATTLEBORO
In Seven Lessons
licpriuted by Courtesy of Country Life.
tny at Paul Chase is of, special interest. ' bottom of the Connecticut fiver. ha been
When she was in tin IUchtieM jail Cur- buried in the ground. Las been taken
tis Hathaway of that town was one of Iw.Ully from tlie custody of an express
the odd jear'guardians. Last summer he company. has Ivcn locked in jail and has
came to lirattleboro to visit Dennison IS. had miiv other strange a bid in g places.
Cwles another odd year Amherst man.! Siihrina has been present at many
and they called at Mr. Chase's and were class banquets, ami on the majority of
( .Li.., ti,r,.iiP-li the barn, nassinz close to th'w-e uns.ons she has been in the cus-
the stairway under which the much cov-, today of the even year men. At otne of
i ..t,l Siihi-iiin lav. separated from them . t he IwiKiiM ts she has failed to appear, be-
by only the half-inch boards which en
! ciosed her. Mr. Cowlex was there several
1 Ci 1
Would
JAMES A. PULMAN
401 Main St., Fitchbcrg, Mass.
"I purchased "Fruit-a-tives" and
used thern for Constipation over two
years ago. I thought they might
help me and did not espeot more, so
you may imagine my surprise when
I found the treatment not only
regulated the action of my bowels,
but also acted as a tonic to the whole
system and built me up in every way.
I have been a long sufferer with
Constipation and never have I found
anything to equal this fruit medicine.
"Fruit-a-tives" have given me
strength and my general health has
improved materially".
JAMES A. TULMAX.
"Fruit-a-tives" or "Fruit Laxo Tablets",
nade from fruit juices ami tonics, is the
greatest remedy knovn for Constipation
oOc a box, (1 for $2. GO, trial size 25c.
At dealers or from KUUIT-A-TI VES
Limited, J( i DCNrtUUllG. N. Y.
Thomas T. Brittan
Fire Accident
Insurance
Liability Life
Wilder Bldg., Brattleboro
Through the courtesy of Country Life
(Carden City, N. Y..) The lioforiner is
reprinting from the December number of
that magazine an article entitled The
Finer Points in Skiing, by Fred II, liar-
I ..T.. Tr-itt1.iKiiiik irinntl f til win-
I i. 'k A'tuiiiv vuaii iuuii "v ......
ter sports committee of lirattleboro Com
munity Servite. Mr. Harris has divided
the article, which was illustrated by sev
eral excellent halftone pictures, into seven
lessons. It suggested hat they be pre
served by persons interested in skiing,
which seems destined to become a popu
lar sport in this locality.
LESSON 2.
When vour skis are iinally strapped on
and you are ready tor the tirst trial, bo
content with an hour's work on the
level. Accustom yourself to the feel of
the skis. 3ever start by sliding down
hill. Of course you know that sliding
is where the tun comes in and you want
to try it, li.it this will all come later. I
would advise that you do not go near a
hill the fust day, but I know you will
not do this, at least be satisfied with
sliding down very easy grades. 'Stay
within jour powers" is always a good
motto, but neer so important as at the
beginning.
(if the infinite maneuvers and turns on
?k s this article can speak of but a lew.
and 1 have chosen the following which
are perhaps the most important and use
ful: on the level; uphill; straight run
ning downhill normal position; steer
ing; snow-plough; Telemark swing;
t'hristiania swing.
On the Level. IJcst progress on the
level is made by lunging forward on one
foot, keeping the weight well on the
front ski. Then, before the skis have
stopped, plunge forward and slide on the
other ski. Do not lose your forward mo
tion. Get your skis going and keep them
under way.
rphill. Almost any one can get down
hill in some fashion, but getting uphill
is not .so ca.-y. Perhaps it is not out of
place to discu.-s uphill work before go
ing any further. In this connection, the
beginner must have a great deal of re
spect for his skis. .Many people seem
to think they can say, "kis. take me
directly up this steep slope,'' and ex
pect, the skis to do it. They charge di
rectly up the hill and very soon the skis
slip out from under them. They are si
little too ambitious and over-rate their
own hill-climbing abilities. A few such
teach, however, that
round is the shortest
and map out in advance a little cam
paign of how to surmount it, the top
is quickly gained. If the nature of the
ground is such that it is necessary to
climb steeply, one has to resort to side
stepping, half-side-stepping, or herring
boanig. The latter is used only in nar
row trails and lor short distances. In
the halr-side-stepj you push one ski for
ward diagonally, at the same time be
ing sure to bring up the heel of the ski
so that the ski in its new position is
parallel to but ahead of the other ski.
Von then lilt up the lower ski to take
its place beside the other. This step
takes but little energy and i the most
useful of all hill climbing steps. i
What you do with the heels of your
skis is very important, lie sure to lift
the heel well up so that the ski lies
nearly level across the slope. Some
times on the trail it is necessary to step
backward as you swina up your heel.
Walk inn backward and bringing the
heels of your skis up the slope is very
uood practice.
The kick-turn is almost inclespensable
ia hill climbing, and is especially useful
in reversing your -'osition on very steep
slopes. It is easier to make the kick
turn downhill, but if made up the hill,
vim gain two or three feet on the next
step when you bring around the other
ski. Hill climbing is simply a knack
wlrch comes with practice.
times during the summer.
In is."7 (iov. Joel Ilayden of Massa
chusetts gave money to Amherst college
for the erection of a bronze statue ot
! coddcsH Sabrina. The same year
'statue was made from an original which
is at Shrewsbury. England. Its weight
is about UH) pounds and if is four and a
half feet high. It remained on the col
lege campus several years in peaceful
solitude. About one of the students
was discovered dressing Sabrina by one
:f t! activities of those who
g::iii possession of her. She was
nt the bainpi. t of the class of lH'M at the
ISi-ooks II.-. i e in lirattleboro in June.
lSSrj. Edgar llurr Smith, now principal
the (Of the tireennelcl lugli school, formerly
I he : principal of Ihe lirattleboro high school.
of which he is a graduate, was living
here at that time and was a fneinber of
Amherst '14. Sabrina was shipiwHl in a
carload of groceries to lirattleboro.
through an arrangement made by Mr.
Smith. WIk-u the class arrived at the
hotel Sabrina was presented, and when
lvi. After ber capture from the odd
year men at Litchfield, Conn., in
mi odd-year aiumnus in New York city
offered a reward of ''.".0tH for the cap
ture of the elusive image. Detectives
formerly were used in trailing Sabrina,
but rules formulated last -spring require
that thd trailing must be done by Amherst
students or nliiinni. There are ways,
however, of circumventing those rules.
No More Dandruff
A leading hair dresser says she has
found nothing as good as Parisian sage to
banish all dandruff and make the, hair
soft, thick and lustrous. We sell it on
money back plan. Root's Pharmacy.
Advertisement.
of the professors, and a committee of the me cneermg nau suosuieu . eacu man
faculty gave ltini a severe reprimand, kissed the goddess and she was then
With 'an axe the revengeful student dis-, whisked away to Chesterfield, N. II.. and
figured Sabrina's face, but bv skillful j seated und-r II. C. Harvey's barn floor,
hammering the scars were removed. The' On several occasions Sabrina has been
class of INTO whitewashed Sabrina be- ''ken back to Old Amherst by antonm
cause one of their number had been ex- bile by some of her daring guardian and
i..llM t .liflVrent. times nn to 1S7S after a glimpse of her lias been vouch-
li -o ! in nninfpi1 in a v;i riot v -.sa fed to the
of colors, and on
student body she has been
spirited away in utter disregard
of speed
SAIiKlXA IN TOWN.
(Continued from i'age J.)
BOND & SON
i:stablihed IS 72
Th Largpst Ideal Equipped
r.xclus're Morticians in Vermont'.
Facilities and Services
Cnsurprisscd.
CHAPEL AND ROOMS
in our building
Tel. (4 W or It
BRATTLEBORO, VT.
soon
wa v
experiences
the longest
way up.
It is necessary so to attune yourself
with vi.-iir skis that just before the sk's
slip the warning can be felt that a slip
:s coming. Then tack oti' on an easier
gradient. To prevent slipping, lift the
point of the ski a few inches and slap
it down a if you were going to glue it
to tlie soot. Tiiis causes the underside
of the ski to -lick a little more, and it
this small adva'itag" which makes the
!il!erciec between slipping and not
slipping. The beginner should make long,
easy tacks and not try to no directly up
a ?teep slope.
If the ski runner wilt study each hill
as it comes to it. not'-c th? contours.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
DR. E. L. TRACY, Physician nd Sonjeon, 214
Main St. Office hours: 8 to 9 a. m 1 to 3 p. m.,
7 toj 30 p. m. Te 1. 256.
DR. B. E. WHITE, Physician and Surgeon.
Barber Building, Rooms 205 and 206. Hours:
1-3 and 73 p. m. Office tel., 717-W. res.. 717-R.
DR. G. B. HUNTER.bffIce at residVnceTWest
Brattleboro. Hours: 8 to 9 a. m.; 1 to 2, and
6.30to 8pL m. Telephone, 319.
W. J. KAINE, MD.7Phy8ician and Surgeon.
Office. Room 10, UP.ery building. Hours: 8.30
to 9..-0; 1.30 to 3.00; 7 to 8. Office 'phone, 429-W.
.Residence, a frost, St., 'phone, 427-K.
C. R. AI.DRICH. t r TTrmr.- 1?ln tr f VI
7 to 8. Office 'phone, lo5-W; house, 165-R.
X-ray work a specialty.
G. R. ANDERSON, Surgeon and Physician.
Surgery a specialty. Office and residence,
P.rooks House, 128 Main St. Hours: After
noons, 1.30 to 3. evenings, 7 to 8, except Tues
days and Fridays. Sundays by appointment
o-ily. 'Phone 246.
DR. GRACE W. BURNETT, Physician and
aurgeon. .Market tiiock, fcltiot bt. Umce
hours: 8.30 to 9.30 a. m.; 1.30 to 2.30, and 7 to 8
p. in. Telephone 744-W.
DR. n. P. GREENE, Physician and Surgeon.
Office, Bank block. Hours: 1.30 to 3, and 7 to
8 p. m. Residence, 83 Green St. Telephone
connection. Mornings and Sundays by ap
poir;rment only.
EDWARDR. LYNCbTm. D. Surgery a ape
cialty. Office, Park Building. 'Phone. 540.
Hours. 1 to 4 p. in.; 7 to 9 p. m. Residence,
Putney Road. 'Phone, 177. Sunday by ap
pointment only.
PR- AaJ- MH-LERritooker block, Brattle
boro. Office hours: 8 to 9,1 to 2, 6.30 to 8.
w. r. noyes. ir. r pi;c"tVv--n;j"e-'rrr
tye, lvir, Nose and Throat. Classes fitted. Hrs.
30j5cd.ndSat. Kve. Am. Bldg.
DR. HENRY TUCKER. Residence. trGro7e
;st.; telephone, 258. Office, Leonard block.
Hours: 1.30 to 3, and 7 to 8. Telephone, 29-YV.
DR. K. L. WATERMAN. Office, 117 Main St. I
yver is.uecn store, tlrs.: 1.30-3, 7-8. Tel. 42-W.
W. H. LANE, M. D., 117Y.fain St. Hours:
1 to 3 and 7 to 8, except Sundays. Tel. 7P9-W.
DR. C. G. WHEELER, Osteopathic Physician,
110 Barber Bldg. Office hours: 10 to 12 and 2
ireatmeiit Dy appointment. Tel. 219-W. I
HASKINS & SCHWENK, Attorney and Coun
sellorsat Law. Brattleboro, Vt.
DR. G. F. BARBERDentist! Union block,
BraUteboro.
FRAN K E. BARBER, Attorney at Law. Bar
ber Building, Brattleboro.
O. B. HUGHES, Lawyer. 212 Barber Building.
Telephone 1106-W.
BARROWS & CO., Wholesale and Retail
t-eeirrs in coals 01 au Kinds. Office, 37 Main
BOND &SON,Exclusive Undertaking. Auto
mobde service. Telephone 264-W.
by automobile tr that city. They brought
the precious bronze goddess here by night,
aecop.ipauied by some other Amherst men,
and took it to West lirattleboro, where
they buried it by the roadside near a cot
tage beyond the I'ettee farm.
The next night the T.rattleboro men
dug up Sabrina and carried her to Col.
Kstey's home, where she hal been twice
before. There she was locked in a bath
nwnn for two nights, and the third night
she reposed in the attic- on the third floor.
Meanwhile the other Amherst men who.
came with the statue from North Adams
returned to Sabrina's burial place and
were lmn'h alarmed to ft i if I only a hole
in the ground. They were much more
alarmed when they called at a near-by
house and cnipiireil if the cceupants had
heard any suspicious nnises in the night
ami were informed that they heard an
automobile going past with some men who
were exclaiming, "We've got her! We've
got her!"' They learned later that their
fear-s were unfounded.
The three lirattleboro alumni toed; Sa
brina from the Kstey residence to the
Chase barn, where they put her under a
stairway and then oarch-d up the hid
. ing place. She' was taken through the
streets in Mr. Chase's Kord car. with
nothing over her. about 7 p. m. and re
mained in hiding until she recently started
on another journey into the unknown.
Just before taking leave of her guard
. ians here Sabrina and two of the eunrd
.ians posed for a phrtograph. which was
made by l'enjamin A. Crown in the Chase
barn and is published in this issue of
The IJeformer. (hie of the guardi.i"..
.lueoh I. IXrj, was out Of town at the
tune, which is the reason why his picture
dees not appear with tlie others.
An incident in c-.tiectiou with Sabrina's
several occasions was
carried away, but was returned. In'lSTS
Sabrina began to figure as a class ven
ture, and after a few years of rough
handling, such as being thrown into the
college well by the class of 'S'.l to cele
brate a baseball victory, her nude and
dusky exterior was marred in various
places. At one time she was taken to
the top of the chapel tower, and on vari
ous occasions she adorned the top of
some professor's desk in the morning.
Failine in their attempts to stop these
pranks, the college authorities decided to
put Sabrina out of the way forever and
entrusted the task to ''I'r&fessor Char
lie," the colored janitor, who was to
break her up. Such a fate was unde
served by so handsome a ligure. so Pro
fessor Charlie hid Sabrina under the
i..... :.. i.:.. i I. ...... .i... i x
iui. 111 I'ltiu, nuor rnv 0mni iviili ..
years. Finally rumors became current Uuf Vliailiy VJlliy lilClieSE
I mat the goddess was still in existence and I
that the darky caretaker was keeping
her in seclusion, and on Sunday night,'
June 1!. 17, several students of thej
class of lMHl made a raid on Professor J
unarnes premises wane tne tanuiy was
away and rescued the goddess, much to
the surprise of the faculty. Since then
she has been a living reality in the lives
of Amherst men, and the efforts of the
even year classes and the odd year
classes to outwit each other in the strug
gle for the ssess.ion ctf the bronze im
age have carried her through a wide va
riety of experiences, "some of them of a
thrilling character. She Las slept in the
Announcement
We Always Carry a
Complete Stock of
Wirthmore
Poultry Feeds
Crosby Grain Store
Godfrey Crosby, Prop.
Rear of Harmony Block
Tel. 135
f WV7 fe
WITH -tiarcrnfiMOr-S'
a KiO rsn 53i : r
-If
.i
TOS HiGBT WAV
To Feed For Big Egg Production
Feed one quart of Wirthmore Scratch Feed in deep Utter to each
twenty hens in the morning, and what they will eat up clean in
the afternoon.
Wirthmore Scratch keeps them busy, makes them healthy and
supplies the necessary food to keep their bodies in good condition
for heavy egg production.
You cannot obtain heavy egg production unless you feed the
proper amount of protein, fat, carbohydrates, ash and lime.
AH these are furnished in Wirthmore Buttermilk Mash and
Scratch Feed.
Follow Wirthmore Feeding System' for best results which
tuny described in our tree Egg Record Book.
Buy of your Wirthmore dealer
are
Chas. M. Cox Co.
Wholesale Dittribators
Boston, Man.
St. Albans Grain Co.
Manufacturers
St. Albans, Vermont
W'irthora
Mamh and Scratch Feed ara put tip it
machina-Meumd aackt OXLY.
Owe Quality Only The. 8 est
4
Life or Death
The life or death of your storage battery de
pends largely upon the ability and experience of
the service station where it is recharged or re
paired. We constantly endeavor to send our cus
tomers away highly satisfied.
YOUR SATISFACTION IS OUR SUCCESS .
No matter what make of battery you use we
are not satisfied unless you get the maximum
amount of service from it.
Manlcy Brothers Co., Inc.
BATTERY SERVICE STATION
High Street Brattleboro, Vermont
4
The
THE
Home of the Christmas Club
Twenty Dollars in Gold
Will Be Paid December 15, 1922, by
BRATTLEBORO TRUST
COMPANY
(THE HOME OF THE CHRISTMAS CLUB)
to the two members of the 1922 Christmas Club who submit the nearest estimates
FIRST: $10.00 Total Number of Accounts Opened in 1922 Club.
SECOND: $10:00 Total Amount Deposited in 1922 Club
This contest is open to any member of our Christmas Club who completes his payments during the
50-week period of the Club, but no estimate will be considered if made by a director, officer or employe
of this bank, or by anyone after January 15; 1922.
For further information inquire at the CHRISTMAS CLUB window.
Join Now the 1922 Christmas Club
Tiventy Dollars in Gold
THE BRATTLEBORO TRUST COMPANY
(THE HOME OF THE CHRISTMAS CLUB)
0
(To be filled in and signed)
The Brattleboro Trust Coriipany
TWENTY DOLLARS IN COLD
CONDITIONS
All contestants must be members of our 1922 Christmas Club and must make their weekly payments
each week for fifty weeks they are due, or in advance, and this blank properly filled out muct be de
livered or mailed to us prior to January 15, 1922.
My estimate of Total Accounts in your 1922 Club is
My estimate of Total Deposits in your 1922 Club is : ,
'PHONE'354-W
Moran & Rohclc
Funeral Directors
Automobile Equipment
57 MAIN STREET
Brattleboro, Vermont
i -w hLnj - t
1 COSTS LESS PER MONTH nrxrnv, lVft'?rtM III Address i f
I . : - k ; Sr-Sitimii I I B r...:. r-,..,. . v II
-un
"" " " ' vr
"CAP" STUBBS Tippie Couldn't See Any Keason for Waiting! Trotected by George Matthew Adams t By EOwina
" lAlNJNBuy 1 1 M t7?T A All ' TOACTW.THA
i V W GCTTttM'i ?3H ,OT 6 1 W Vml . 7xtVEN HERE VET
S1.. . 5 M, A W WtL- i3..Tt jCE EITHER?
p V . 3 "
Advertise in Tne REFORMER j

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