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The Brattleboro daily reformer. (Brattleboro, Vt.) 1913-1955, January 27, 1922, EARLY MAIL EDITION, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86071593/1922-01-27/ed-1/seq-8/

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THE BRATTLEBORO DAILY REFORMER.' FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 1022.
NEWFANE.
Mrs. Georgia Radway returned Mon
day from a visit of a weik in the home
of her sister, Mrs. Kel.sey of South
Xmvfane.
J.- II. T'nIerwool is having his house
v.i; for olM-frio light. Electrician
Aiitmr . IIw if this village haa
harge ( tin wurk.
rI "h thnnlt ii'l cold wave arrival in
Xvf;u,c Sunday, when a real blizzard
pi' voiU d. all day. Notwithstanding this
si:t umisual -liiiniliPi- attended church.
k mmm of cglgr
Sjnc persons have a mistaken
notion r;-t.riliri? the lor of tea.
",iur li.is n. thin to do with tea
tju.tlily, tit!n r in the lvtvt-s or in
the l.iv.v.
Hut color i important when it
cumes to sclwlinf; a tea by the
la!x-l. There" Veliow, for instance.
LUTON'S iincst tea the linest of
the. world's linest is Lipton's Yel
low Lalcl hrand.
The reason LII'TOXS Tea has
the largest sale in the world is not
lx-cau-e Upton grows more tea than
other lea planters nor because of
the color of the label but becau.se
Upton grows better tea.
Ask your grocer for LIPTOS'S
'f!iow Label Tea. If he does
uof xvU it, send vs his name and
ii W'i'.'.s a. -'d ire vill mail you a
I RLE : :!:n pic and gite you (lie
lunuc of (i grocer nho cart supply
i,o,i. '.dilrefs Thomas-J . I.ipton,
'lr Hohoka,, X. J.
MORE
RAILROAD
EMPLOYER SPRING
B. W. Hooper of United
States Labor Board In
Optimistic Mood
NOT HIS WAY .
FARMERS ALONE
REALLY DEFLATED
No l'anu-luite of Organization to Ease
Ills Industrial Fall Will Not 1U
Caught Again America on Tiptoe
Calling "Let's Go."
BOSTON, Mass., dan. 27. Railway
managements iwid their employes have a
moral obligation to avoid interruption
of t rathe and the United States railroad
labor board is endeavoring to lead both
carriers and rail workers to carry out
this obligation, P.en W. Hooper, vice
chairman of the labor board, declared
today before the Boston chamber of
commerce.
Mr. Hooper, O. AV. W. Hanger, public
member, and W. L. McMenimen, labor
members of the board, were guests of the
chamber at a luncheon, where Mr. Hoo
per voiced the opinion that America had
passed through "the, winter of our dis
content'" and was now ''standing on
tiptoe, with the slogan of the vernacu
lar on her lips. 'Let's go.'
"The hard pull is over," the former
governor of Tennessee said. "The farmer
is the only man in the country who has
really deflated. He alone did not have
j I THIS IS TK6 SECOND TIMB I O0NT 1 kZK VOU TO SITTLB
j THIS WEEK VOU'VB B5E N THIS CASE OUT SIDE OF
I VIE CAN'T DO ) wmY? I THE PlMNTlFF V0Nt)
the parachute of organization to retard
his descent and break his fall. The next
time this country takes an international
joyride in the Zeppelin of war, the
farmer will have his parachute along
with him and will not be invited to
tep out on a storm cloud and slide
down fn a rainbow.''
Mr. Hooper said he expected the num
ber of railway 'employes to be largely
increased in the spring, that revenues
would lie enlarged bv increased business
and that conditions would probably jus
tify a reduction of rates "which is o
essential to the restoration of normal
business. ' '
In return to normal, Gov. Hooper
said, the railroads had accomplished the
transaction without any general strike
or serious disturbance.
"The question will occur to yon : AVill
the fear of the condemnation ot public
sentiment always secure the obedience!
of the parties to the decisions of the
railroad labor board, or will there come
a time when powerful motives of self
interest will induce one or tlie other to
trample under foot the board's de
cision and over-ride pubjio opinion?
"I would not underestimate the' po
tency of public opinion. It exerts a tre
mendous influence in this country of
ours. My personal view is that neither
the carriers nor Iheir employers have
the moral right to discontinue railway
operation to enforce the demands of
either upon the other. -
"It must not be forgotten that there
are some labor leaders and certain la
bor periodicals which persistently preach
the disquieting doctrine that the toilers
of this country cannot trust the courts
and tribunals having jurisdiction of
their troubles. The railroad labor board,
if moved by a profound desire to do jus
tice, may largely counteract .this destruc
tive preachment, and that without slop
ping over like a neuresthenic parlor
Communist." ,
The action of the Grand CSrcuit stew
ards in adopting a schedule covering the
same circuit as last season's means that
no new tracks will be able to break Into
the Big Line this year.
WOMAN'S COMPLEX LIFE .
Women's complex life with its multi
tudinous calls is given as the reason for
many a nervous breakdown. Home work,
social obligations, dressmaking and the
care of children keep the 20th century
woman in a whirlwind of activity until
headaches develop, backache, nervousness
and oftentimes more serious ills which
are peculiar to her sex alone. Such women
should not despair, but be guided by
the letters so often published in this pa
per from women who have been in ust
.such conditions, but who have been re
stored to health by Lydia E. Pinkham's
Vegetable Compound.
This is a root and herb medicine that
contains no drugs and can be taken in
safety by any woman. Advertisement.
SANALT
Cleanses the Blood
Tones up the System
Sold at
The Park Drug Store
VERMONT INVESTMENT
CORPORATION
Investment Securities
List of Current Offerings
Furnished On Application
Phone 55
Room 1, American Bldg.
Brattleboro
s
i
J
ut
lie insurance
is the medium by which thousands
2S9H
of individuals join to protect each
other and the families of each from the certain loss of income occasioned by their ultimate death.
The National Life Insurance Company
is composed of 104,160 such individuals whose combined protection amounts to $333,894,264.39, each having contributed his or her share according to age and the period of time
during which each has enjoyed mutual protection.
There are no stockholders and all accumulations belong to the Policyholders, who benefit by all savings or profits through reductions in the cost of their insurance. (See dividends
to policyholders in statement below.)
has taken 72 years to accomplish this organization of mutual benefit benefit to each, individual insurer, benefit to his or her beneficiary, benefit to the entire community- in
ich such individual resides - Policyholders or tto 7 " ' ......
A person joining this Company today secures the combined support and protection of an organization dedicated to the maintenance of
v
It
which each
THRIFT, MUTUAL PROTECTION AND INDEPENDENCE
The statement below is in a form that every man or woman should understand, showing the progress 'of the
NATIONAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY, Montpelier, Vermont
TO JANUARY 1, 1922
DIRECTORS
WILLIAM P. DILLINGHAM
United States Senator
HARRY M. CUTLER
Vice President
WILLIAM W. STICKNEY
Lawyer
GEORGE H. OLMSTED
Ohio and Indiana Agent
CHARLES P. SMITH
Pres. Burlington Sayings Bank
FRED A. HOWLAND
President
CHARLES W. GAMMONS
Massachusetts Agent
OSMAN D. CLARK
Secretary
FRANK C. PARTRIDGE '
President Vermont Marble Co.
HENRY RUSSELL PLATT
Lawyer, Chicago
ARTHUR B. BISBEE, M. D.
Vice President and Medical Director
J GRAY ESTEY
President Estey Organ Co.
JOHN M. THOMAS
. President Penn. State College
THE POLICYHOLDERS OWN AND HAVE IN COMPANY'S
VAULTS THE FOLLOWING SECURITIES:
(0
(2)
(3)
()
(5)
CO
7)
United States and Dominion of Canada Government Bonds, salable in
the open market on December 31, 1921, at
State and Municipal Bonds within the United States, salable in the open
market on December 31, 1921, at
TOTAL MARKET VALUE OF BONDS DECEMBER 31, 1921
These Bonds have a par value payable at maturity of 27,356,613.07
and include no item upon which there is a default in either principal
. or interest.
First Mortgages on Real Estate pledged by 6,296 individual borrowers
whose farms, homes or other Real Estate have been inspected and
valued by Company Inspectors at $110,614,592.00
Policyholders' Premium and Policy Loan notes secured by the cash
value of their individual policies
Earned Interest on above securities between the last interest payment
and December 31, 1921, (Due and Accrued) '
Real Estate occupied by the Company , for the transaction of Company
business
Cash on hand and deposited in nineteen Banks,.
Net balances due from Company Agents through whose offices premi
ums are collected ". .
Funds available to meet any demand
$ 7,760,373.00
18,561,344.07
$26,321,717.07
$ 35,567,513.98
12,453,972.41
2,022,059.89
919,000.00
1,003,324.84
5,261.50
THE COMPANY IS HOLDEN TO ITS POLICYHOLDERS BY LAW
For the net amounts required by the various State Insurance Depart
ments representing the Policyholders' individual and separate contribu
tions (Reserves) increased each year by interest received from invest
ments and by net premium payments
THE COMPANY OWES ITS POLICYHOLDERS
Premiums paid in advance of date due, unclaimed balances on Divi
dends. Endowments, Annuities, Surrendered Policies, Surplus left with
the Company to accumulate at interest, and losses awaiting proof . " " "''
THE COMPANY OWES ITS POLICYHOLDERS
Dividends as declared by the Board of Directors for payments to
policyholders on anniversary dates in 1922 '
THE COMPANY OWES ITS POLICYHOLDERS
In various groups, the Accumulated Dividends set apart for future
payment as their insurance contracts provide '..
Taxes payable in 1922 ($373,435.74) and estimated Death Losses of which no
notice has been received ($125,000) . . '. ....... " ' T
The Company computes all other accrued obligations to date . i f- '
Total Obligations to secure which Investments are held
LEAVING A SURPLUS AS AN ADDITIONAL GUARANTY TO MEET .
ALL CONTINGENCIES AND CONTRIBUTE TO FUTURE
EARNINGS
$78,292,&49.69 ,
Every member now admitted into the Company has the advantage of this surplus guaranty without additional cost.
During the past year 15,278 new members were admitted for an insurance aggregating $56,084,072, while 1,789 applicants for admittance were declined as uninsurable,
insurable today and become uninsurable tomorrow. It is the duty of our agents to explain the benefits of Life Insurance as applied to your individual needs.
$67,704,980.97
520,436.35
3,000,442.05
2,728,031.28
. 498,485.74
91,052.66
$74,543,429.05
3,749,420.64
$78,292,849.69
YOU may be
Welcome their call
before your health is impaired or your age changes.
E. S. Kinsley, General Agent, Rutland, Vt.
Frederick C Dines, Agent, Brattleboro, Vt
via Msgg gag

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