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The Brattleboro daily reformer. (Brattleboro, Vt.) 1913-1955, August 21, 1922, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86071593/1922-08-21/ed-1/seq-5/

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THT3 BRATTLEBORO DAILY REFORMER; MONDAY, AUGUST 21 1922.
5
I!
Quality Goes All Way Throush
Post's Ice Cream
Try It and Be Convinced
Flavors
French Vanilla French Tistachio
American Vanilln .Maple Walnut
Chocolate Fresh Fruit Straw
berry Lemon Sherbet Orange Sherbet
Keep Well "Posted" liy Ileadin?
This Ad.
And Keep Well liy Eating
Post's Ice Cream '
Wholesale or Ketail
Deliveries Made
Tel. 411-W 75 Elliot St.
"Th2 Brattleboro Disaster"
Spr:igfleld Paper Comments on
Aviation Accident
Dorp sympathy
tlolioro over the
(i;iv Llijjlitf'l t!it
llyinz lield. The
will be felt with Drat
di.aster which n Fri-
tl(iication of the new
accident under any cir
cumstances would have been a terrible
hoc!v ; the blow i.s all tiie severer because
of the great expectations which had been
'aroused. One purpose of the elaborate
P
Today Only Y
RINCESSflftf
THEATRE
4.
James Oliver Cur wood's
Drama of the Hudson Bay Country
66
tilt; :
Big S
Ask., "tfj
f- V
llOWS
9?
Drama
of the
Hudson
Batj
Country
throbbing
human
story with all the
romance, adventure,
thrills and spirit em
bodied in Mr. Cur
wood's story has been
visualized in this virile
outdoor picture.
Powerful
Actins:
Scenic SpJendor
1 ense bituations.
What Was the Honor of the Big Snows?
The code that every man living two hundred miles
away from Civilization's rim had to live up to or else
he could not live.
It Was the Law of the Woods
that the strong must protect the weak that a man
will SUFFER STARVE DIE before he takes
what belongs to another man.
DAY ONLY: ....
ONE
Toonerville Blues
Matinee 2.30, Admission,
Evenings 7-8.45, Admission,
International News
Children 10c,
Children 15c,
Adults 20.
Adults, 23c.
dies"
TOMORROW
"Fifty Can
From the Saturday Evening Post Story by
EARL DERR BIGGERS
Featuring
Mar jorie Daw, Bertram Grassby
and Dorothy Sibley
Comedy News
WEDNESDAY
ELAINE HAMMERSTEIN
IN
"Under
O
.1-
til
exhibition which was being given was to
demonstrate the safety cf aviation and
thus to increase public interest in it.
From this point of view the tragic out
come must to some extent neutralize the
splendid efforts which have been made
by Governor Ilartness, Fred l. Harris
of Iirattleloro and others to interest the
public and to promote aviation in Ver
mont. Nor can it be said that the accident
was due to negligence, incompetence or
any single cause the elimination of which
would promise entire safety in the fu
ture. Pilot Hughes is a veteran who
flew in France, and this was his first
accident since he engaged in civil avia
tion. The plane had broken a strut in
landing the day before, but the broken
part had been replaced, and there has
been no suggestion that the machine was
not sound and in good running order;
the company which made and operated it
has carried 1! 1,000 passengers with no
previous loss of life. The weather was
not ideal, yet the aviators complained
only of a certain '"bur.ipiness." ; if avia
tion were under rigid, government inspec
tion, such as is sometimes urged for the
prevention of accidents, it , is doubtful
whether flying would have been prohib
ited, though cautionary Hags would cer
tainly have been hoisted if there were
such a service for aviators as the weather
bureau gives to mariners.
The 'accident, so far as the available
facts show, was due to a combination of
causes, none of which perhaps can be
entirely eliminated, jet all of which de
serve consideration. First- of all there
is the live wire into which the machine
was thrown when a wing-tip brushed a
tree; quite possibly but for this there
would have been no loss of life. This,
taken with the shocking disaster to the
ltoma from 'a similar cause, shows that
power wires are a grave menace to navi
gation of the air. Until they are all put
underground this danger must remain,
but so far as possible flying fields should
be located where the air is free from such
obstructions.
It may be said also, without criticism
of the man whose fine public spirit made
the Urattleboro Hying field possible, that
the location and laying out of the
grounds left a somewhat inadequate mar
gin of safety in taking off and alighting.
Hughes was a skilled veteran, but if
aviation is to flourish provision must be
made for novices, with leeway for floun
dering a little if the take-off is not quite
lucky. It is said a hummock in th"
lield. on which the machine had bumped
the day befure and which had made trou
ble since so angered the pilot that o?i the
fatal flight he took off in the opposite di
rection, and getting into an air pocket
over the river failed, in spite of dextrous
manipulation, to rise rapidly enough to
clear the trees.
No one of these contributory causes
might in itself have caused an accident,
and none of them need be stressed. If
there is a moral to be drawn it is that I
rafety be secured. At best an aviator
will have to make some emergency land
ing with a certain risk; there is the more
reason for giving him plenty of elbow
room on the flying field, with no risk of
running into trees or wires before getting
his height.
AVhat the government can do to pro
mote safety is still an open tiuestion. In
spection of machines has been proposed,
but inspection has to be made before
each flight, and the pilot and his
mechanician are the best inspectors.
The question of weather is difficult, be
cause perfect day are few aj?d at other
times opinions differ in regard to safety.
It is not to be expected that aviators will
wait for a perfect day, but there must be
many days on which the public should
be warned of the risk. I ossibly in com
mercial flying there may be a temptation
to carry passengers in dangerously fluky
weather, but this element had no place
in the Urattleboro tragedy. There is no
getting away from the fact that flying is
still a risk ; such accidents must be taken
as casualties in the struggle for the con
quest of the air and all that can be done
is to try to learn their lessons and thus
by degrees to reduce the loss of life. It
may be hoped that-Urattleboro and Ver
mont will not be discouraged by this
stunning misfortune. Springfield liepub-lican.
WEST BRATCLEBORO
BRATTLEBORO LOCAL
Andrew Hanimarlund has sold his
house at 21 West street to.Jacob II. Bax
ter, the sale being made fh rough the real
estate department of the P.rattleboro
Trust Co. ,
James A. Gallett, professional at the
Frattleboro Country club, tied for fourth
prize in the invitation tournament at
Woodstock Saturday. First prize was
won by Parker Schofield, the well-known
amateur.
Mr. and Mrs. C. R- Prentiss visited at
I). II." Smith's in ll'utney yesterday.
Mr. and Mrs. diaries Dix of Spring
field, Mass., are gin'sts nt Fred Fox's.
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Chase are spend
ing their vacation in. the Adirondack.
Blanche Moore of . Wilmington is visit
ing her grandmother, Mrs. F. D. Marsh.
Miss Kntlierine' Locke is in the Mel
Tose hospital, following an operation for
appendicitis.
Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Millington of Am
lierst, Mass., are visiting among relatives
jn this place.
Walter Taylor, , who is employed in
!Nortk Bennington, was at his home for
the week-end.
Mr. and Mrs. P. M. Davis and Mrs.
"hloe Stafford visited friends in lieads-
boro yesterday. .
Mrs. Cora Gallup was called to
Northfield yesterday to nurse Silas
Bailey of that town.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Pettee of Dor
chester, Mass., came Saturday for a va
cation of two weeks at the Hill home
te:ul. Mrs. Galison and daughter, Mona, of
Boston, who have been visiting at F. 1).
Marsh's, have gone to Greenwich, Mass.,
to visit relatives.
Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Hadlock and
Mrs. Clarence Hathaway, who have been
tending a week at Frank Hadloek's
returned to West Townshend yesterday.
Kalph Lawton of Springfield, Mass.,
who spent the week with his grandpar
ents, Mr. and Mrs. I. W. Chase, re
turned to his home yesterday.
ADVERTISE YOUR FOR SAXES
IN TIIE REFORMER
$1,200
$1,200
the working efficiency of gravitation is
100 per cent, and that only by incessant
vigilance at every point can reasonable
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44
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25
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62
IR GROUNDS
Can yon finish
Draw from one to
the end.
this picture?
two and so on
to
Given away in prizes, including Ford car
10 Hours Solid Entertainment 10
VALLEY FA
LABOR DAY
MORNING
Parade $25.00 prize for most attractive float.
$25.00 prize for most original float.
Base Ball Game immediately after the parade
, air Grounds.
AFTERNOON
5 Horse Races 2:17, 2:21, 2:40 trot or pace,
all open
Farmers Race Running Race
Base Ball Game Tug of War
Novelty Races Ponie Ring
Antique Auto show and parade, models 10 years
or older to enter. Communicate with Harold
Shea for particulars.
EVENING
Street Carnival Confetti, Streamers, Greased
Pig, Chicken Chase.
Dance Festival Hall
For full particulars on entries, etc., address
Commander BRATTLEBORO POST NO. 5,
AMERICAN LEGION.
Hair Dressed Complete With a Hair Net
We sell only the highest quality hair nets.
Gainsborough, single or double mesh, natural hair
and m colors to match your own hair. Durable,
serviceable, beautiful and economical because
the better they are the lower the price always.
Single Mesh Price 10
Double Mesh Price 15, 2 for 25
Lrnnj, .fiw,,- ,f. , , ninl,,,nik.,,Mrt'TiV .iiMHWrju j., f -1"tj:..e.,.ji;.,..i..r, J
9,
jUI III f
i "i"-if- " A ' " -. h, i ii hTiM&
Armore Plate Lead-Coated Steel
Look for the Name Belmont On the Caskets
GUARANTEE
Fifteen years actual use have proved the Belmont
Casket to be Indestructible and the Belmont Casket Manufact
uring Co., authorizes all Funeral Directors to replace this casket
without expense to the purchaser should it at anytime fail to
fulfill the guarantee.
bond & SON
Representative for Brattleboro
:Hoimliton & Simonds:
IS THE FIRST DAY
OF THE
GREAT
AND
, i mif ' fr
From now on - for 1 1
days every counter, rack and
table in the store will given over
to the display of
Marked Do wn
i
1f ?tfr
t.
i -
k
I f
4 f.
r ;
It
i
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