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Virginian-pilot. (Norfolk, Va.) 1898-1911, August 20, 1899, Image 15

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BERKLEY NEWS?PORTSMOUTH ADVERTISEMENTS AND TELEGRAPH CONTINUED.
Pi. J. PHILLIPS,
INVENTORY SALE STILL IN PROGRESS!
On Mondaij Morning, fluflust 21, 9:30 to 10:00
Fruit of Loom and Androscog,gin Bleached Cottons,
Ten Yards to a Customer, 6c. Yard.
WR HAVE FILLED UP THE WINDOW WITH LADIES' 50c. AND 75c.
WAISTS. THEY STAUT TO-DAY FOR 29c. each. SIZES FROM ill TO 4J.
Ladles' Crash and Linen Skirts?the
prices on these have been cut to cost.
A good chance to pet a $1.25 Corset for
60c.. In the, special lot.
SG-lnch Sc. I'ercale for 5c?at cost price.
Men's Colored Percale Shirts, for fall
wear, reduced to 33c; all sizes.
All Lawns at cost.
Special reduction in Towels.
NO SAMPLES CUT OFF "SPECIAL SALE GOODS." ' 1
A. J. PHILLIPS, 302 and 304 High St.
One H?re Chance
BEFORE WE TAKE INVENTORY. FOR THE NEXT THREE DAYS
WE OFFER THE FOLLOWING tIOOD3 AT A VERY LOW PRICE:
SxlO 12V4c. Lawn, 5c.
10c. Chcvolt, i.e.
12',ic. Tercalc. Sc.
12Vie. Solid Color Lawns. Sc.
12iic Gingham, tie.
?V. Shirt Waists. 25c.
Jl.ro Shirt Waists. 50c.
JI.OO Mull Caps. ."iOc.
T.V. Mull Caps, 28c.
COc Mull Caps. 25c.
Mull Caps. I2"?c.
A few more Canopies loft. 110x11 worth $2.50 go for $2.00. 100x10, worth $2.00, go
tor $1.00. Children's Paranoia worth 78c. to $1.75 ;to this week for 60c. each.
STORE CLOSES (i O'CLOCK.
W. C NASH, 229 High Street.
>i.
Xa
<~FOR TEN DAYS
Baseball, Bicycle
and Walking
CALL AND GET A BARGAIN.
SHOES!
W. Wo "White,
108 High St. Portsmouth, Va.
********
Green Ginger, 10c. lb.
Mixed Spices, 20c lb.
FOR PICKLING AND PRESERVING.
?AT?
JE ROHE P. CAR RS.
WHOLESALE AMD RETAIL DRUGGIST, Corner Court and County Sts.
and Green Street, near Bart.
CARR'S ALL-HEALING OINTMEN T CURES PILES AND OLD SORES.
WANT^T? GO FARMING ?
1 have for File- a farm. !>0 acres, nice house, 5 rooms, barn and all neressary
out buildings: will sell VERY CHEAP. Call and Invest Rate.
HOMESEEKERS AND INVESTORS.?I have a large list to select from. Call
and see me or drop a postal and 1 will call and see you.
R. ?. BROOKS.
Real Estate, Rents and Insurance, Hish St., Portsmouth Va.
LOANS. Reil 'phono 2222.
s
Mr. Harry Goodman returned Friday
afternoon from Baltimore, whore he
purchased a full stock of furniture.
Mr. W. 1.. Bailie, who was elected
from the Second Ward to fill the va?
cancy In the Council, caused by the
resignation of Mr. T. C. Humphries,
qualified before Mayor McCoy Friday.
Rev. T. Clftgett Skinner, who has
been spendlnK his vacation In the
mountains, will occupy his pulpit at
the Berkley Avenue Baptist Church
this morning and evening.
Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Morgan and chil?
dren left Friday for Elizabeth City, N.
C. to spend several weeks.
Miss Caddie ftuggles, accompanied by
Miss Rose Mae Porter, her Kuest, left
yesterday for Richmond.
The services of two the Sanitary In?
spectors have been dispensed with, and
Messrs. John Berkley and R. L. Cray
have been given charge of the Third
Ward, which is In need of the services
of just such men
The storm Thursday played havoc
with the shade trees on Liberty s;reet.
Five were unrooted and the branches
of many others were badly broken. The
street was a reminder of a cleared
forest yesterday.
Prof. S. M. Smith, principal of Kenly
Institute, Kenly. X. C, is the Ruost of
Rev. M. W. Butler, on. Second street
He will be present at the Christian En?
deavor Society of Main Street Christian
Church and probably address the meet?
ing.
Ladles, your chance this week is at
Mr. W. B. Daugherty's department
store. Chestnut street. He has just re?
ceived a new and handsome line of
lace and pat terns, which he Is giing to
run off in a special sale this week.
Call and examine sroods.
To VOU who wear shoes?Mr. H. L.
West has them in all styles, siz's and
shapes, either for ladies' or gent's. He
Is expecting his fall stock in soon and
is making room by putting his shoes
down at the remarkably low prices
?which you will see by referring to his
add.
Remember Mr. T- C. Humphries is
Sellins: out at cost to go out of the
shoe business, and will Quit the busi?
ness by the 15th of September, and that
is the place to get some ripe bargains
in shoes. See ad.
St. Thomas' Church. Rev. H. S. Lan?
caster, rector?Holy Communion, S a.
m.: morninp prayer and sermon, 11
o'clock: evening prayer and sermon, ?5
o'clo.-k.
Mr. W. H. Butler, in order to adver?
tise his teas and coffees, will to-day
only sell these freods at 20 per cent,
discount, at No. h Berkley avenue. See
ad.
AN UMBRELLA THIEF.
The propensity of an unknown negro
to steal an umbrella that belonged to
Mr. P- H. Deans, of the firm of Deans
A Gordan, yesterday morning while it
was raining caused him a lively chase
nnd a sore head. Mr. Deans was sit?
ting at Iiis desk when the negro came
along and, seeing the umbrella In n
rack near by the door, he walked In,
Blezed it and started out. Mr. Deans,
seeing his action, walked out the store
and halted the negro, who. instead of
stepping, mended his pace with the
umbrella In hand. Mr. Deans state)
that this reminded him of the fact that
lie had not forgotten how to run, nor
thrash a negro either, nnd ho stepped
out behind the negro, who threw the
umbrella down; but that did not satisfy
Mr. Deans. He wanted the negro and
continued the chase, ns follows: Re
Rinning at the store- corner Liberty and
Seventh streets, down Liberty to Sixth.
Sixth to Herkley avenue, which was
three blocks away; tip Berkley avenue
to Eighth, thence down Eighth to Ma
hone avenue; down Mahone avenue to
Seventh, Seventh to Berkley avenue,
whre he halted him and knocked him
down with a bed slat, which he carried
for the purpose, Inflicting a gash in the
hark part of the negro's head alKHit four
incites in length- The negro cried out,
"I did not steal your umbrella." and
rolled over twice and scrambled tip.
The distance Mr. Deans chased the
negro was about a. mile.
_ BERKLEY A D VTS^_
WE MUST HAVE ROOM FOR OUR
Kall stock of Shoes. In order to
jret it we will cut on the season's goods.
Men's H.oo Tan Sh'.e-:. $2..1!) ladles' Ox?
fords, 41.7.">. far Sl">: Roys' Black Vlci.
$2.00. for $1.49: Ladles' $1.G0 Oxfords for
90c. Men's $2.50 Blnck Viel for 11.75, Men's
$2..',0 Tans for $!..v>. AH Summer goods
cut.
H. L. WEST, 76 Chestnut Street
AT DOUGHERTY'S
72-71 CHESTNUT STREET.
Jti5t received from the importers, a
beautiful lino of Hamburg Edging, Va
lendenne Races and Insertlngs. cheat
VALUES. NEW PATTERNS. It
NOTICE!
In order to close out my stock by Sep?
tember 15th I have mido another cut on
the prices of my goods.
I aivi selling at cost and some at 50 per
cent, below cost.
Wo have a lot of Ladies' Oxford? selling
at any price, and Ladies' Shoes, which
were $1.25, now* 90c.
A Fine Shoo for $LG0, now $1.10.
My Ladies' $3.00 Cinderella. Shoe, now
$2.10.
Gent's W.e? Viol Kid. Tan or Rla.-k, now
$2.75.
Gent's $3.50 Shoes, $2.40.
Men's cheap Shoes from 00c. up.
Store for rent after September 15th.
T. C. Humphries,
aul9-2t 100 Chestnut St.. Berkley. Va
(Concluded From First Page.)
cannot do otherwise than deny; hut he
must know that this document is not I
the only one of his which we have in
our hands. I cannot enumerate them,
but we have particularly a letter from
his government, written on official pa?
per, asking him to obtain official in?
formation regarding a \'ss<! of the
French navy, and anothi r letter In
which he Is asked to request Uie French
government officially for three cavalry
sabres of a certain pattern. These sa?
bres were asked for and granted
through the Intermediary of the Third
Bureau.
A DENIAL..
General Cons - denied that Esterhasy
had received money from the intelli?
gence Department, and.'describing the
"strunge behavior" of Dreyfus and his
"frequent acts of Indiscretion" the wit?
ness begged the court to summon the
secretary of the Ministry of War, who
surprised tile prisoner prying in the of?
fices at a thnC|\vhen there was no bus?
iness going on there.
The General defended Guenee and
referred to another spy as an "honora?
ble man" whose name he could not give
as having furnished military headquar?
ters witli valuable Information.
The witness asserted that while the
name of Dreyfus was Often mentioned
in the documents in the possession of
the Intelligence Department, his inno?
cence was nowhere hinted at.
DEFENDS l>f l'ATY DE CUM.
The General then proc< i d< I to defend
nil Paly de Clam from the insinuations
of Colonel Picquart and corroborated
General Mcrclcr's evidence in regard to
the alleged confessions made to Cap?
tain Lcbrun-Renault.
The General denied several state?
ments made by Picquart and referred
to the alleged number of arrests order?
ed by Picquart on "unfounded charges
of espionage."
Considerable comment was aroused
by the fact that, contrary to the pro?
visions of tlte law requiring the testi?
mony to be verbal and without notes.
General Gonse, adjusting Iiis eye
glasses, proceeded to consult a large
note book and frequently refreshed his
memory.
THE HENRY FORGERY.
Dealing with the Henry forgery. Gen-j
eral Gonse said:
"I can say it was already known.
General B?get spoke to me about It at
length eight dnya before Henry con?
fessed." (Sensation.)
The witness disputed Magistrate Ber
tulus' account of the Interview with
Henry, but admitted thai when he,
(General Gonse) handed Henry his for?
gery, the latter Insisted it must not be
shown to Picquart. (Sensation.)
Replying to M. Demange, witness ad?
mitted he had ordered Colonel Pic?
quart not to concern himself with the
handwriting of the bordereau when he
commenced his investigations of Es
terhasy.
"Then," asked M. Demange sharply,
"when you saw his handwritings were
Identical with the writing of the bor?
dereau, did that make no Impression
on you?"
"Evidently." replied the witness, "the
two handwritings had a great re
scmbla nee."
STATEMENT BY DREYFUS.
When Dreyfus was asked the regular
question, he said:
"I will reply directly to the Secre?
tary of tlie Ministry of War, who said
he saw me in the offices after service
hours.
"As regards General Gonse, I am sur?
prised that the General Office repeats
dinner-table gossip. There Is known to
be insurmountable difficulty in intro?
ducing any one Into the Ministry of
War. and it Is absolutely impossible for
an officer to bring anyone Into the min?
istry."
To this the General replied:
"No doubt it i? difficult."
Colonel Jououst? "No doubt it is dif?
ficult, but it is not Impossible. The
ministry can be entered easily chough
at certain hours. Dreyfus was In a po?
sition to know that." (Sensation).
ANOTHER LIE GIVEN.
The Prisoner?"I will reply to Secre?
tary Ferret, who hart told a lie. What
I have to say to General Gonse is that
every time a friend came to see me at
the Ministry, even when a French offi?
cer, 1 was obliged to descend to the
lloor below, and even members of the
Chamber of Deputier! who called on me
could not enter the Ministry. It was
consequently absolutely Impossible un?
der ordinary circumstances for a sub?
altern to bring any one Into the Min?
istry."
General Gonse declared that permits
could easily be obtained.
CO EON E f; PI CQ CAR T A G AIN.
Col. Picquart re-entered the witness
box in order to reply to allegations as
to tlie way he performed his duties. He
denied a number of General (louse's as?
sertions regarding the arrests, which
the witness ordered.
Counsel for the defence, after em?
phasizing the fact that even in the
opinion of General de Bofsdcfre there
was a connection between the Ester
hazy and Dreyfus affairs, asked the
president of the court to request Col.
Picquart to give information in regard
to the loo.oao francs paid to have been
expended for the surveillance of Estcr
hasy.
Picquart explained how expenditures
were regulated in the intelligence dc
p.irtmcnt. and the day's sitting ended
with .1 colloquoy between Picquart and
General Billot as to the expenditures
of Secret Service funds. The court ad?
journed until Monday.
DREYFUS' C<iMMENTS.
When Dreyfus was asked if bo wished
to reply to this witness, lie declared
he had never asked Major Cuignct for
documents except by .the desire of his
chief major. Berlin.
"All the details which Major Culgnet
has given on this subject," said the
prisoner, "sprang out of his own imagi?
nation, and are due to tie- same state
of mind which prompts unreasoning
bitterness even against an innocent
man."
A SIGNIFICANT ABSENCE.
The name ..f Major Pu Paty do Clam
was th.-n called, whereupon Major Car?
riers s.aid tlie Major had been officially
informed that his presence was neces?
sary to the court-martial, and it was
hoped he would be able to come as soon
as possible, but the Government Com?
missary had heard nothing from him
since this notification was sent.
At the request of M. Demange it was
decided to notify Paty de Clam that
the court-martial was ready to hear
his deposition.
GENERAL DE BOISDEFRE.
General de Boisdefre. former chief of
the general staff of the French army,
then advanced to the witness box and
took the customary oath to tell the
truth. The General remarked that in
view of the exhaustive evidence already |
given ho would try to bo brief. He,
hurriedly reviewed the leakage iu thc|
Ministry of War, the discovery of the
bordereau, the arrest and trial of Drey?
fus and the hitler's nltcgol confessions,
before the ceremony ot degradation, to
Captain Lebrun-Rennult. Witness said
he believed the confessions wore Pen?
nine. He next referred to Colonel PlC
quart's appearance In the Intelllgenct
Deparmont. although the witness had
hesitated to npp Int him because he
thought Die,unii t too self-confident and
not sufficiently deferential towards his
chiefs.
"it has been Bald," conttnued General
do Bolsdefre, "that a secret package of
papers was shown the Judges of the
court-martial of ISM. I positively as?
sert that, that so far ns I am con?
cerned, 1 riever ? rdered Colonel Plc
quart to convey any envelope to Colo?
nel Mnurel."
The General next described the Inter?
view between himself and Colonel
Plcquart when the latter llrst men?
tioned Estcrhazy, without, however,
connecting him with the Dreyfus affair.
Witness dlscredltctd Colonel Plcquart's
statement that the latter asked him
(witness) not to mention the investi?
gation to General Gonsc.
THE INTERVIEW WITH PICQUART
General de Roh lefre, whose evidence
was attentively followed especially by
the members of the court-martial, thea
related the Incidents of his interviews
with Plcquart, how he sent Plcquart
to .see Gem ral Gonsc, and General
Gonsc's subsequent letter to the wl>
ness, advising n continuance of the in?
vestigations regarding Esterhazy, but
adding that the affair must not be
mixed up with the Dreyfus affair. As
Colonel Plcquart persisted In trying to
hurry matt* rs he was neglecting his
other duties, the witness proposed to
the Minister of War to send him, not
in disgrace, on a mission to Tonking.
but the Min st :? of War. the General
asserted, found another mission for
him.
Everything, the General added, went
quietly for a yen-, until M. Sehourer
Koatner Intervened. This was f illowed
by the denunciation of Esterhazy by
Matthew Dreyfus and the Inquiry Into
Esterhazy's proceedings.
"At that time," the witness said, "i
was convinced of the guilt of Dreyfus
and this conviction is as strong to-day
as ever." (Sensation).
ESTERHAZY A LIAR.
"I regard It .is an abominable crime."
continued the General, "to have en?
deavored to substitute for him a man of
straw, however disreputable he may
have been, and whatever his offene?,
which. i:i any case, would not lessen
the guilt of Dreyfus. My conviction is
the same as at the. commencement of
the affair. Estcrhazy, it is true, at a
certain pyscologlcal and singularly well
chos. n moment confessed to having
written the bordereau, but he has made
many other statements. He is always
telling lies. What is certain In that he
could never have delivered the docu?
ments enumerated in the borderau."
Then the witness lirielly referred to
the trial and acquittal of Esterhazy,
and the lattcr's threats to proclaim
himself a tool of the General Staff, aft?
er which the General alluded to the
Henry forgery nnd M. Cavaignac's in?
terrogations: of Henry.
POSING S A MARTY Ii.
"You know the result," said he, ap?
parently much moved.
"I will not tell you what I suffered
nt that moment. As soon ns every tiling
was ended I tendered my resignation,
but was asked to withdraw It. I was
told everyone could make a mistake,
hut 1 replied that While every,me was
liable to err, everyone had not the
misfortune, as l had. to assert to a
jury that a document was genuine,
when, in reality, it was forged; that
everyone ought, to stand by one's word,
nnd that when a man happened to ex?
perience such a misfortune there was
nothing left, for him but to go away
ami from that moment I have held
aloof.'" i Sensation).
Replying to the court. Gvneral de
Bolsdefre admitted that the leakage
at the headquarters continued after the
condemnation of Dreyfus, it ceased
for a year, but In 1S95, a paper was
discovered proving the communication
to a foreign government of a document
relating to the distribution of the ar?
tillery and showing that a foreign gov?
ernment was perfectly acquainted with
the changes made.
Answering a question put by a mem?
ber of the court-martial relative to the
conflicting testimony of Genoral M?r?
der, the fortner Minister of War. and
M. Caslmlr-Porler (formerly President
of the Kreuch Rcpubll ?) witness r- pi ed
thai he certainly had an Interview
with General Mercicr early In January
during the course of which Mercler re?
marked. In regard to the representa?
tions of n foreign ambassador to the
President of the Republic:
" 'It is not going to happen this
time, either. You can sleep In peace.
The Incident has been settled.'"
At the conclusion Of General de Bols
defre's testimony, Dreyfus on being
asked the usual question, replied that
he had nothing to say.
GENERAL GONSE CART.ED.
After a brief suspension,of the sit?
ting of the court General Genre, who
was under chief of the General staff,
was called to tho witness stand. He
exploi t) d the motives which Influenced
his actions during the past few years,
and said he believed h ? was ''animated
I by the loftiest alms, namely?the pro?
tection of the army against the cr'.ml
nnl attacks made on it from all sides."
General Gonse said that In spite of
Esterhazy's statements it was Impos?
sible for him to have written tho bor?
dereau and still more Impossible for
him to have secured the Information
contained therein. Ho lidded that no
traces of indiscretion were discovered
during nil the proceedings against Es?
terhazy.
A TOAST.
"Finally wo have a memorandum of
the toast proposed by him at t'n ? fire
well dinner to his comrade and friend
Agent "A" (Schwarzkoppen). Th>
author of the report now alleged t? bei
false referred to if soveral tlmea In th*
midst of his toast. In order to r^ ill
to him the terms of his toast and to
show that our documents are authen?
tic I will recall only the last phrase.
After expressing regrets at the depar?
ture of "A" and telling him we should
have the best recollections of him, he
added, and I qu do toxtually;
" 'For a long time to come !n all th"
armlos of the world, in America and
Asia. A will long- to he talked About
and it will be said A was quite unique. "
Major Cuignet's statement was ap?
parently designed to prove the acute
r,<-.<.j of th.-> intelligence department lo
j elicit a vigoro-.is denial.
A SENSATION*.
Major farrier-, the government's
commissary, said he thought It desira?
ble to remark, as tho representative of
the government, that he must tut be
understood to endorse all Major Culg
net had said with "reference to a for-,
eign military officer who at the pros-'
ent moment held a diplomatic appoint-1
ment In France." (Sensation.)
Replying i i m. Di mange, Major Cu'.g-'
net insis: 1 that if Henry committed!
forgery "it was In the interests of the
count: y."
A REMINDER.
To this statement, counsel retorted:
??You did not say that to the Court
of Cassation."
At the request of M. Demange. the
Major's deposition before the Court of i
Cassation, relating to Henry's motives
and Paty do Cant's share in the pre?
paration of the forgery, was read. It
showed that Cuignet emphatically de?
clared before the Court of Cassation
that ho was convin i an investigation
would easily show thtil Paty de Clam
was the principal author of the Henry
forgery.
THE WITNESS CONFUSED.
Witness claimed he thought he was!
doing his duty "in saying ail that is
in my mind."
"Do you adhere," asked counsel, "to
all you said before the full Court of.
Cassation ?"
This question greatly confused the
witness, who attempted to explain by;
saying ho was "only arguing .it that
time," and that it was hot for lorn to <
judge Paty de Clan .
EMILY CRAWFORD'S SUMMARY
(Copyright, ISM, by Associated Press.)
l'.enncg, Aug. 13.?Opinions differ as
to what the Judgment of the Dreyfus
tribunal will be. Townspeople who i
know well General Germain and Gen?
eral Lucas, of this army corps, think i
the decision will be .tg.iir.st the ac- !
cuacd. On the other hand at the Hotel
Moder?, which ts now the gi -at con?
versational news center, the Idea pre-!
vails of a reluctant Judgment In his
favor.
The tribunal certainly sh:;res the
feelings of the military witnesses, but
there are signs of coming around. I no?
ticed a member of the cotint-tuartiul
watching Dreyfus to-day with an ex?
pression of compassionate. Interest.
Then, again, Colonel Jouuust, the pres?
ident, did not rebuke him for upostro
phlslng Captain Cuignet, who led the
profession of military Witnesses to?
day, nor order him, us he \\ .u< wont to
do, not to speak until be was address?
ed.
MORE HOPEFUL*.
Maitre Demange is more hopeful, al?
though acknowledging the perverse use
the nationalists made of (be Schneider
and Pnnlzznrdl telegrams to Inflame
patriotic sentiment. That party now
demands the full uublictitlon of the
secret dossier, so as to heap disgrace
on the military attaches and the Illus?
trious German Prince Involved?a
prime who lived Ions in Paris.
I should not be surprised at a lie.
This would enable the prisoner to leave
the court a fire man. but would Show
thai half the Judges believe.i him guilty.
The Schneider letter, or telegram, is
resented by all but the Droyfusltes as
an ateinpt t<> cast odium on the Kreuch
army. It ought to benefit the prisoner,
but does not. Military men say it
wo>it,i sot the face of the court-mnrttnt
harder against him.
THE MAJORITY.
The majority seem to adopt Captain
Cuignot's opinion, it is thought,
though not expressed, thus: That the
military attaches have behaved abom
Inally in the Dreyfus affair: thai the
French government is in possession of
numerous specimens of Schneider's
handwriting; that the document on
which General Mercler relied will bear
every test arid that it has been accept?
ed by every Minister of War since 1SSM
and been compared with letters written
to six of them by cd. Schneider.
Captain Cuignet spoke with n hollow
voll e. quite different from that in which
01:0 days ago lie made Iiis virulent at?
tack on Dreyfus. His attitude, how
? v. r. was as assertive as before, though
ins I mguagc was less so. He is :\ fair,
sandy-hatred man. with a big red mus
tache and a resonant, metallic voice,
good for command. He is among the
few witnesses who have deposed while
standing.
MERCIER'S DEMOLISHED THEORY
To-day hla task was to destroy the
effect of t'ae questions of Malt re De?
mange and to set up again the demol?
ished theory of General Mercler.
Cuignet was in the Fourth Bureau of
the General Staff when Dreyfus was
in another bureau, but not under his
orders. They were both engaged in cal?
culating wli.it work Invasion mould
throw on the railways, but were en?
gaged on different lines.
Dreyfus, he said, constantly came to
him for Information, which be bad no
cause to do. Cuignet kept refusing, un?
til he was tirrd out by the Importuni?
ties Of tile accused. Theri, by degrees,
he gave him. Cuignet deposed, all the
notes he himself had m ide.
DII> NOT RETURN NOTES. '
Dreyfus, according lo the witness,
never returned the notes.
When search was mad.- at his home
they were not found. What had be?
come of them? Dreyfus was not the
man to ens! them away. Cuignot's In?
sinuation waa that they were sent to
lierlln. The conclusion was far-fetch?
ed, but the members of the court-mar?
tial made a note of it.
1 in jnet then defended Esterhazy
against Picquart. and next against Du
Paty de Clam. He gave fresh peeps at
the secret military dossier. In which are
so many ordina y letters from women,
opinions on public men, and tittle-tattle
of a spicy riource.
CUlghet sold he was sorry the court
h id not examined this voluminous dis
which proved a deal of light, some?
times crude light "on spies of different
categories, Including military at
. hi 5." The latter, he remarked, were
far from b^ing the only spies regularly
kept up by foreign governments. It
was only natural, he argued, that the
military attaches should accuse Ester
hazy, but they knew the traitor had
been In the very heart of the citadel. In
the general staff.
' The traitor," he exclnirned, "is no!
Esterhazy, but Dreyfus." Here Cap?
tain Dreyfus lost his self control. Start
Ing to his feet, he violently apostro?
phized Cuignet.
COLD AS A TOAD.
Rut Cuignet did not seem stung to
anger. Cold as a trad, he went on with
his invective, the diction clear, measur?
ed and slow. He constantly drank
sweetened water to moisten his palate.
Ne new facts were brought forward
by Captain Cuignet, and every otic tired
of him.
General deftoisdefre was also n wit?
ness. He dented that Colonel Plcquart,
on the occasion of the first Dreyfus
trial, was sent with secret papers to
the president of the court-martial. Hera
was a'cautious witness, but he had to
support the other generals. He eulo?
gized the suicide Henry as "worthy of
the fullest confidence." and spoke of
Plcquart as "the organizer of the Drey?
fus agitation.", Bolsdefre declared him?
self convinced of the guilt of the ac?
cused. Really that punt might be the
subject of a chorus of generals In an
opcia bouft. t.
PICQUART ACCUSED.
Plcquart, he accused of wishing to
substitute a man of straw for the real
traitor. He argued on this Wise: The
three years Dreyfus spoke of on tho
day of his degradation had passed.
Pros rlptlon for tho crime of treason
would, therefore, protect n man of
straw from legal consequences. As ho
was. Plcquart. thought, a scamp, no
great injury would be done him by
throwing on him the odium that Drey?
fus deserved.' Nevertheless he, tthe
witness) had learned of JNcqiiart's
e theme, black and abominable.
Rut why follow- General de Bolsdefre?
Why follow General GonseV Why fol?
low General Billot or the others In
their long-winded disquisitions? Colo?
nel Plcriuarl -it ihn end was allowed to
defend himself against the malignant
tits' nuatlons and assertions of nil.
Until Maltres Demarige and Labor I
speak, one should risk no opinion as to
ihe oul -omc. General Rillot thinks
there will be many fluctuations before
th ' trial Is ovr. but he confidently ex?
pects a verdict of guilty.
The government seems more neutral
sin the F rclgn Minister. M. D?lcnsse,
returned from his visit to Count Muni
vleff. EMILY CRAWFORD.
MORE PROOF OF INNOCENCE.
Vienna, Aug. 10.?The Allgemlene
Zeitung says:
"Colonel Punlzzardl, former military
' attache of the Italian embassy in Par
j is. has In his possession the identical
; notes on Mndng-ascar, which is specified
In the bordereau In the Dreyfus affair,
i It is in Esterhuzy's handwriting and
' the paper is similar to that Of the bor
1 derenu.
"It was sent to Colonel SchwarzkOp
i pen,, attache of the German embassy,
who had it copied. The copy was sent
to Berlin and the original to Colonel
PnnizznrdI that he might have a copy.
This he did but he forgot to return the
original to his brother ottaehe."
W1LL*ARREST MERC1ER.
London, Aug. 19.?The Paris corrc
spondent of the Sunday Special says:
"The government, i understand, has
decided to arrest General Mer tier. It is
rumored that Orders will he given to
withdraw the case against Dryfus, it
, having been dlsnovered thai the docu
. nichts relied upon to established his
\ guilt are forgeries."
TO STARVE Til KM OUT.
Paris. Aug. 19.?A strict blockade has
been established in the Rn0 de t'hahrol.
and the authorities have this morning
begun a regular solge ? f the building
in which M. Guer.n and his nntl-SemitO
co||.-agues have entrenched themselves.
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