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Virginian-pilot. (Norfolk, Va.) 1898-1911, September 27, 1899, Image 4

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. "?v. ' 1 ?BT THE? ?
[virginian and pilot publishing
': .,; ? - ? ; company. ;. .
NORFOLK. AND DAIlf PILOT.
: '(Consolidated March, 1S3?)_
Entered at the1 Postofflco at Norfolk.
jVa.. an second-class matter. ^
OFFICE: PILOT BUILDING,
CITY HALL AVENUE,
NORFOLK, VA. _
OFFICERS:
A. H, Grandy. President; W. 8. Wilk?
inson, Treasurer; Jamas E. Allen, Secre?
tary. ? ;
> ' * BOARD OF !7 SECTORS:
A. H. Grandy, Hi. ?tarKe. Jr.; T. W..
Bhellon, R. W. Sir W. S. Wilkinson
; James E. Alien, 1' .jonovan.
TIlnKKCKN Kitcui'y.
subscription rates:
Tho VIKGINIAN-P1LOT Is delivered to i
eubscrlbers by carriers In Norfolk ami
vicinity, Portsmouth. Berkley bufTolK
West .Norfolk. Newport Newu. for 10
cenla per week, payable to tne oM-rier.
By ma.ll. to any piacs In tho United
States, postage free:
J>AII.T. our jrer - - SU.OO
3.00
alz mini I Ii? - -
flirre h<?iil Ii* - - '?a0
?ine moiiili - *?
.no
ADVERTISING RATES: Advertise
merits Inserted at tho rate of i& cents a
Square, first Insertion; each subsequent
insertion ?0 cenln. or 60 cents when in?
serted Every OthiT Day. Contractor* are
not allowed to exceed their space or ad?
vertise other than their legitimate busi?
ness, excerpt by paying especially for tho
lame,
Beading- Notices Invariably 20 cents per
Uno first Insertion. Each aubaequent in?
sertion IS cents. _
No omplo^ee of the VirKlnlan-PIlot Pub?
lishing Company Is authorised to contract
any obligation in tho name ot the com?
pany, or to Uinka purchases In the name
?f the same, except upon orders signed oy
the PRESIDENT OF THE COMPANY.
In order to avoid delays, on account of
personal absence, letters and all commu?
nications for Tho VIRGINIAN-PILOT
should not ba addressed to any individual
connected with tho office, but simply to
The VIRGTNI AN AND PILOT PUB?
LISHING COMPANY._
TWELVE PAGES
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 37. 1SA9.
THERE BE CASES AND CASES.
The Norfolk Vlrglnlan-Pllot 1b always
at odds with The Times. Our doctrines
?Rra't suit It, which Is all the worse for
the Vlrglnlan-Pllot. In a recent Issue it
lias the following:
"Tet Mr. Bryan's plan of suppressing
trusts is to permit no corporation to
operate in any State other than that in
which it was Incorporated except under
c. license Issued by Federal authority.
How is it possible for any man who beT
HeveB In local self-government, In State
eovereignty and In the great -principle
of individual liberty to favor a national
latv of this character, under which citi?
zens would not be permltte'd to unite
their capital and talents to carry on
business outside the borders of their
own State.?Richmond Times.
Of course. Mr. Bryan is for that and
for governmental ownership of rail?
roads ajid other public franchises, just
as the Vlrglnlan-Pllot Is, and we sup?
pose The Times Ir?as ,i last resort, to
control these combines and to keep
tliem from controlling the government
and enslaving the people.
But lo! The Times Itself is for the
Federal control or State banks, so as to
control their issues; as to color, nnd for?
bid the circulation of the notes of the
banks of one State in the bounds of
Tiny other State! under the penalties
of felony, at tha,t too. The Times very
readily
"Compounds for sins it Is inclined to.
By damning those it has no mind to!"
The late Frank Q. RufTin used to tell
this story: A friend of his In Amelia
bought a horse. The first time he rode
It It Btumblctl and fell. He took It
back and said this horse Is blind. "Oh
no," snld the seller, "he Is not blind,
nil the matter with him Is he can't dis?
tinguish."
So we sny to the Virginian-Pilot, "It
can't distingulshr"?-Richmond Times.
The Vlrglnlan-Pllot knows an older
nnd a better story than that, which It
learned In an early edition of Web?
ster's Spelllng-Book, Illustrating how
circumstances niter cases. Perhaps our
esteemed contemporary remembers how
clear the case appeared to tho lawyer
when the farmer told how his bull had
gored tho lawyer's ox, but how mixed
the matter became when the real facts
appeared, that the lawyer's ox had
gored the farmer's bull,
So with the Times, it knows too well
to "distinguish" '"twixt tweedledum
and twecdledeo," and how to ?
"Sever and divide,
?Twixt North-Northwest and Northwest
side."
In illustration whereof, and to give
the Times a full hearing, we now'ap?
pend the remainder of its article:
If the Vlrglnlan-Pllot had kept up
with the Time's discussions of consti?
tutional law as we have had occasion to
discuss it, it would know that The
Times has repeatedly claimed that the
framcrs of the constitution never In?
tended that the Congress of the United
States should ever have any authority
or control over the subject of money
and currency except to coin money out
of the precious metals ami regulate lbs
value thereof. It was not Intended that
the government of the United States
should Issue paper currency itself nor
was it intended thai it should inter?
fere In any way whatever with the
banks of the Slates issuing their own
notes upon such, terms as the States
themselves chose to prescribe, and thai
w?8 the theory of Ihe constitution held
by the overwhelming majority of in?
telligent men prior to thc.wvtr.
? But the supposed necessities of the
war caused Congress to seize upon en?
tire control of the subject of money nnd
currency, and it usurped to Itself
power to. issue paper currency and to
forbid the State banks to Issue it, and
when this power was challenged a war
Supreme Court, administering the war
Ylew of the constitution, felt compelled
to acquiesce In the claim of Congress,
and it laid down the'doctrine In Vrassle
'Bank vs. Fenno that Congress had com?
plete control over ihe subject of paper
currency and that It could print It upon
?lieh terms as it .pleased or it could
ftbsoltitely .prohibit any agenoy what
?Y?r from Jsvulng It.
The Time? thinks this a.; war,yicw of
the constitution": and out of -harmony
with all true and corrcot views of it.
But It is the law of the land, laid down
by the proper authority of the. land, and
it Is the duty of all good citizens to ac?
cept and obey It. But because we must
tit-cent this most unfortunate departure
from the spirit of the constitution, does
it follow that we must permit - Mr.
Bryan to make further encroachmentr
? ThVvirglnlan-PHot must learn toj
"distinguish."
For the. sake of argument; only, let]
us admit alt tbat as pertinent and,
valid: does It therefore Beoome the
Times out-Herod Herod, and be more
royalist than the King? Does all It re-J
cites and pleads justify it to recom?
mend an inferior paper money for the
States (for Virginia) that must be
printed at the U. S. Treasury, in all the
colors of Joseph's garment, with a dif?
ferent color for every State, and for?
bidden by act of Congress tt> be clrcu.
Iated beyond the respective States in
which issued under penalty of fclony7
This is the Independent, original, volun?
tary proposition of the Times, with no
emergency to demand or excuse, and
when there waa no suggestion of any?
thing from the administration, Con?
gress, or the Supreme Court nt once so
ridiculous and monstrous In itself, and
so disgraceful and humiliating to the
States and their citizens.
And yet it Is the Times that scoreB
Mr. Bryan no severely because he sug?
gests that It the Federal power cannot
deal with trustB chartered In New Jer?
sey and doing business in New York,
Virginia, &c, under that clause of the
constitution gives Congress authority
"to regulate commerce with foreign na?
tions, and among the several States,"
and the further authority "to make all
laws which 6hnll be necessary and
proper for currying into execution tho
foregoing powers, and all other powers
vested by this constitution in the gov?
ernment of the U. S. or in any depart?
ment or officer thereof," nor under the
general power to provide for the gen?
eral welfare,?that then the constitution
be amended to extend or define the
Federal power over inter-state com?
merce more clearly, &c!
OUR AGRICULTURE IN THE
CENSUS.
The Director of the Census is na?
turally anxious to obtain accurate In?
formation on all matters coming with?
in hie province, so that the next census
of the United States may be as full and
reliable as .possible on all ?rubjects. Ts
this end he has mailed letters especial?
ly to Southern editors, urging them to I
exhort their rc%dere to aid the census
gatherers in securing returns for this
I year from our very scattered and dlffl
! cult population, consisting of so many
small f/frmers. and many of these very
Ignorant and colored.
It our section is to have a truthful ex?
hibit in the census, especially as to as*
rlculturc and its products. It will be
well for all our planters, farmers,
truckers and other producers to note
now what they have produced eo far
this year, what they have consumed,
what they have sold, and what they
have on hand;?neglecting nothing,
however small, that enters Into ths
support or income of the producers, j
Unless this be done, wc are likely to
make a very poor showing as to pro- I
ductlon, and we should gratefully and
eagerly second the efforts of the Census I
Director to give our section credit for |
much that our own carelessness and in?
difference have caused its to lose.
There are many, white and colored,
whom our readers are urged to talk to j
about these mattcro, so as to get them
Interested In preparing statements,
ready to give in to the census agents,
who will not come around until June
1, 1900, although the etntistlcs they seek
are as to this year. It will be difficult
even for our most intelligent agricul?
turists, if they depend only on their
memory, to give the centum enumer?
ators next June anything like correct
statistics of their crops; and for the
mass of smaller'and Ignorant farmers,
it will oil be wild gueAs work, or will
be summed up In, "Oil. nothing worlh
mentioning."
At the time of gathering any crop,?
wheat, corn, cotton, peanuts, peas,
beans, tobacco, turnips, potatoes, hay,
&c.,?the amount of It, weighed, meas?
ured, or fairly estimated, should lie .?et
down, with the acreage occupied by It,
wltti statements made from time to
time till June next year of what has
been sold, consumed, and Is now on
hand. The?e notes will be of tise aad
satisfaction to every farmer who de
Klres to have a true Idea of what he Is
doing, while they will be of great value
In obtaining a just measure of the pro?
duction of a county, State, or section.
We trust our readers will not neg?
lect these suggestions and will be ready
\ for the census-age rite, and will also talk
the matter among their neighbors,
I white and colored. Let us make a
I show!
"Sir?" Is often used an as ejaculation
of Inquiry, addressed to the man who
has not been distinctly henj-d. It is
not. as a rule, addressed to women or
children. But a little boy, now twelve
yenrs of nge. Invariably employs it
when ho has foiled to hear distinctly
any one who hns spoken to him, be it
mnn. woman, or child, white or black.
In every Instance he says "Sir?" and
his indiscrirhniate use of it sup.
gests it as n substitute for "whal?"
"eh?" "urn?" "huh?" Ac, we so fre?
quently henc when anyone has not
clearly understood another. The lad
referred:to soys "Sir?" without regard
to sex- It Is nt least a curious example
of the persistence of habit, ns the boy
began it with his first llspinga and now
uses it unconsciously, as it w?re.
' ?A SHAMEFUL'COlVTTRAf ? ? .
"What a shame! What a preslde-hi
end what an admlnisrratiOT!; Dewey
welcomed home with great ahfl. weii
'deeerved honors, and Schley, ^rPOBt, if
not equally, as well-deserving, ,the
victim of naval-and administrativ!?/ ca?
bal at Washington, shorn, practically,
of his lawful rank, in the-navy, snuii
bed and discredited, hio laurels; confis?
cated,to the glory of Sampson, artel the
real hero ,of the great and wonderful
battle of Santiago sent to Coventry'and
a shiplcss station in trio South Atlantic!
Not even given a place In Dewey pro*
ceedlngrt at New Tork! \ -
There can hardly be any comparison
with the two fighta of Manila and San?
tiago Bay." In the former, the Spanish
fleet of Montojo; consisting.of old and
out-of-date hulks, was cooped up In a
harbor,' where riewey. had the splendid
audacity to attack them, with :all the
rumors of ^thickly planted torpedoBB and
dreadf?l mines, 'and to dare the fire of
well-placod land batteries. That done,
his well armed ships, with their train?
ed gunhers, sank, fired and otherwlao
disposed of Montojo's ships (it their
leisure. . .
But at Santiago, with Sampson off on
a scout for prize-money, .Cervera and
his modern, first-class and well ap?
pointed fleet, made a sudden dash from
the harbor for the open sea, where
Schley, with the other heroe? under
his eommand, attacked, pursued and
sank them, one after the other'In the
most skillful and gallant style. It was
a great and glorious viertory. lneempar
aMe In modern mvval warfare except
with that twin achievement of Dewey
at Manila: both victories not only
great in themselves, hut also In their
consequences. If Dewey shattered and
put an end to Spanish power in the
East, so did Schley to Spanish power in
the West.
But in the moment of victory'at San?
tiago Bay, Sampson, the mousing owl
of prizes and prlae-monsy wen by
others, crept upon the scene, raised his
flag of admiral in command, and seized
nil the honors of the battle. Thus was
Schley, the eagle of the occasion,
hawked at and slain, and Sampson rose,
towering in his pride of place with
stolen glory. Anf this when the modest
Schley, claiming nothing but. his share
as an inferior in command, proclaimed
that the victory afforded honor enough
for all! Ay, for nil save Sampson, who
having won none of the glory, naverthe
leas at ones claimed it all try virtue of
his rank, as a minion of the powers at
Washington,?Ignoring and snubbing
Schley and all the other heroes of tht
fight!
In this mean assumption Sampson
was supported by the President and the
Navy Department, and Schley. the
real victor of the fight which destroyed
Cervera's fleet and drove Spain f rem all
American land and water, became the
sacrifice to Sampson's inordinate groed
and vanity; for it was necessary to de?
grade the real hero, so that the false
claimant, Sampson, should engross the
glory of the occasion. And in this I n
famy McKinley acquiesced, as he has
done in all the subsequent persecution
of a gallant officer and noble man?the
hero of Santiago!
REFORM 1 REFORM! REFORM 1
Let no Democrat in Virginia flatter
himself that the Martin cabal will be
content with the re-election of Martin
to the Senate as their contribution te
the power of the money-trust. Even if
the cnbal were willing to stop there,
they will not be allowed bo db so. If
they a.re able to run rough-shod over
Gov. Tyler and the Democracy of Vir?
ginia. No! Their masters, the trusts
and monopolists, including the Na?
tional Office Trust and the Money
Trust, will direct them to put Virginia
In the anti-Bryan rind nnti-silver col?
umn nt the next National Democratic
Convention; nnd if they shall succeed
In forcing Martin again for TJ. S. Sena?
tor upon us, what Is to, prevent them
from falsifying the Virginia Democracy
in the next National Convention. If
this unfaithful organization, in col?
lusion with the roldltos and monopo?
lists, are meekly submitted to, in ac?
cordance with the advice of that por?
tion of the Democratic press which is
shouting for "loyalty." "regularity,"
"party unity," Ac, In behalf of a
treason that has forsworn loyalty,
committed every irregularity, and has
made unity impossible Without a
shameful submission to flagrant wrong
j by all honest nnd manly Virginian
1 Democrats?
! If the Democrats of Virginia still be
; lieve In the Democracy they helped re
Is tore In ISOfi. In spite of the Cleveland
treachery; If they are still 'faithful to
, the eieat leader f'.r whom ihr? so en?
thusiast Icnlly abuuted and worked In
I*f'?; they must row arotisu again, and
in time, lest they, ovrr tfH.POO I n this
State, be put to silence next year, and
i the 2.000 goldito? of Virginia, who voted
j for Pulmer and Buokncr. rush over
i them to the front, and put tip dele?
gates opposed to the renoniln.it ion of
I Brvnn.
! "Eternal vigilance Is' the price of
liberty;" and this is most true when
fraud and treason nre visibly afoot all
around us, and when our worst enemies
are found to be members of our own
household- The e\1l and danger thaT
threaten ns n?st are in our own organi?
sation, and unless that be recast and
reformed from top to bottom, we shall
be worse betrayed In 1900 than we were
in 1S?3, and are likely to be ?jrain .this
year.. ?, . ' ? ? . V
Every manly heart In the Democratic
ranks should rise with the peril of the
occaeion?a Dorfl that will bo augment
etl ^ aiyl:?. errtp tiaaj red ". toy'. ;th?7: re- el ec 11 on
?f .MB^h.'^the ''Kena\e\?'j,-iMt?'no''D.etnb|<
era^.'-.to?' deluded ?? further. - .Misplaced
conilaenc? hasVbrought us all and the
party, to this servile and.-humiliating
posture at the feet of a cabaV''qf
traitors, Up, rhen,'''and at theml
,? . " . -
. SPAIN'S BLOOD MONEY.
Spain has repudiated the falsely so
called Cuban bonds, by refusing to'
assume-the Interest on them and de?
claring, that they ehould.be cared forj
by the government of Cuba?mean Ingj"
of course, the United States. Of course
no free and independent Cuban gov?
ernment Is ever likely to recoanize and
pay these bonds, or interest on them;
for they were iasued by Spain, and If
on any Cuban account, only to put
down the Cuban revolution and sub?
jugate the people to the galling tyran?
ny of Spain. ? .
The next move will be a revival of
the' project to put a claim for these
bonds on the United States,' as this
country intervened In Cuba to end
Spanish, misrule and cruel oppression,
and drove Spain from the West Indies
as well as Cuba and the Philippines.
But as even the treaty ot Paris did
not make the U. S. liable for
these bonds, side by side with the
agreement to give Spain $20,000,000 for a
"sovereignty" In the Philippines, she
did not possess, and which, of ooursc,
the U. S. could not buy from
a vendor who had no right?not even
the right ef subjugation and conquest?
we do not think any syndicate In this
country, even If backed by the money
trust, can now prevail on this adminis?
tration, . or the Congress, to touch
these bemds.
Fraudulently issued, as upon Cuba,
for tyrannical and brutal purposes as
tho original purchasers and subsequent
purchasers well knew, it Is a very good
thing that they are repudiated on all
sides and that the investors and specu?
lators in them are likely to lose ail
the money they risked on the bloody
bonds. It will, or should, teach them
a salutary,lesson, and we trust it may
prove an effective warning against fu?
ture Issues of the kind by any govern?
ment.
REPUBLICAN TORYISM.
Our esteemed contemporary, the
Richmond Dispatch, well says that
Hanna made a bad slip up on landing
in this country, fresh from England,
to deliver to his Interviewers warm
panegyrics en England and her system
of government. A hot State campaign
Is in progress now in Ohio over the
electlen of Governor, and next year the
Presidential election will occur; and
Republican prospects in that State are
so dimmed by the impression that has
get abroad among the people, that this
administration is practically In alliance
with England, or has seme secret un?
derstanding to that effect, that even
Mr. Hay, Secretary of State at Wash?
ington, has felt constrained to write a
letter to Mr. Chairman Dick of the
Ohio Republican State Committee, sol- <
emnly and strenuously denying and re*
pudlatlng the rumored alliance, or uri-!
derstandlng; while Mr. McKinley and
all his friends have been laboring to
the same effect, lest the suspicion of
British inclinations may damage the
g. e. p. In both the State and national!
elections. In the midst of this effort
te get rid of the British taint, in comes
Mr. Hanna, and - But we prefer to
quote the Dispatch on that point as fol?
lows: I
"But Mark had hardly drawn a
breath of the free air of America before
-he^UnhOSOmerLJiimself to a. rcnorlpr to
the effect that his observations In Eng?
land were that It ia a country with a
good political system, as good a sys?
tem, he added, as our own."
That, of course. Is throwing the fat
in the fire again, and gives fresh
grounds for suspecting Toryism in the
administration,?Mr. Hanna, Indeed,
seeming to take the ground that our
noble fathers made a mistake in cast?
ing off "the British yoke" in 177C, and
I establishing a free self-government by
the people that has resulted in this
great and glorious Republic! E pluri
bus unum: Es to perpetua!
sorts Axn opinion*.
CONTROLLING LAWS IN POLITI?
CAL ECONOMY
To the Editor?First?there Is no such
thing as intrinsic value. There is but
one kind of vuue In economics, viz.:
purchasing power.
Second?All money, Including gold. 1?
"flat" money. All money Is created by
law. edict, "flat" of government.
Third?Demand and supply make and
control all vaJufts.
Fourth-Cut down the quantity of
moBoy In circulation one-half (other
conditions remaining unchanged) Rnd
prices of wheat, cotton and other
things, ns a whole, will fall one-half.
Fifth?Double the quantity of money
in circulation (other conditions remain?
ing unchanged) and prices of the peo?
ple's products will double.
Sixth?Double other forms of prop?
erty without Increasing tho quantity
of money in circulation, nnd prices ot
the people's products will fall one-half.
Seventh?There Is no such thing in
reality as "50-cent dollars." It 1s not
the value of the material a dollar Is
made of that controls its value as
money; it Is the fact that it is a dollar,
and is legal tender, that gives..it_ Us
value ss money.
Eighth?the men who hove so much
?lo say about S0-cent dollars aro dolly
passing them, right now, for 300 cents
?thus proving their own statements
untrue.
The foreirolng elementary principles
Of political economy are sanctioned by
all the great writers on money for 1,500{
yesrs past, and the great money lend?
ers of Europo of to-day. Anybody can
figure from the above eight prop?sl-j
tlons whether* wo should restore silver-j
and'have "more money, and less mis?
ery" or not GEORGE PRJ3NTISS.' |
SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES.
ATTfLND THE
MiGHTff SCHOOL
-AT THE?
Southern Shorthand and
Business University
(Also purchasers of the Columbia Bus?
iness College). Corner Granby street and.
City Hall avenue, individual Instruction.
J. M. RESSLEU, President.
'Phone (new) 450.
NORFOLK ACADEMY.
Th1? eighteenth annual sisilon under the
present -Principal will begin on WED?
NESDAY, Septembor 27. 1199. Attendance
last ees^lon, 120.
A seven yrarn' course, three years of
grammar school work and four of sec?
ondary Instruction, preparatory to col?
lege. Note that the same instructors and
the same system of Instruction am em?
ployed In the two grades.
.Boys of goo? character admitted as soon
as they can read with fluency and are
ready to begin fractions.
Terms about one-half the charges for
the same work In Baltimore private
schools and for day scholars about onc
fourth of what they would have to pay
at Virginia boarding schools.
Catalogues at the bookstores or on ap?
plication to Mr. Chas. M. Graves, Jr.
care Wm. Johnston & Co., Huddlngtori
Building, Norfolk. Va.
ROBERT W. TUNSTALL,
Jy22-wed&sat-3m Principal.
Ths Phillips & West School for Girls.
412 FREEMASON ST. NORFOLK, VA.
MISS E. F. PHILLIPS,
MISS S. K. WEST,
Principals.
Fourteenth annual session will begin
OCTOBER Id. 1S9P. A thorough course In
all departments. Diplomas awarded to
graduates. Young- children received In
the primary department. Applications
may be made at tho above or at 273 Bute
St. Circulars can ber obtained from the
book stores. se6-eodlm
MILD, PAINLESS;
but
THE GENTLE HEADING TREAT?
MENT OF CATARRH USED BT DR.
FIRET HA3 RESTORED HUNDREDS
TO HEALTH.. A PROMINENT LUM?
BER MERCHANT ADDS HIS TESTI?
MONY TO ITS POWER TO CURE CA?
TARRH AND DEAFNESS.
DEAFNESS.
"I was. greatly benefited mysolf by Dr.
Flrey'? treatment, so as ONE OF MT
FAMILY HAD VERY DEFECTIVE
HEARING, and I was afraid she would
become entirely deaf, I place.d her under
Dr. Ftrey's treatment. A FEW MONTHS
TREATMENT SUFFICED TO ENTIRE?
LY RESTORE HER HEARING. AND
SHE CAN HEAR NOW AS WELL AS
ANYONE. I have Kreat faith In DR.
FIREY'S TREATMENT FOR CATARRH
AND DEAFNESS and ^cordially recom?
mend It.
"S. W. OOODMAN,
(residence) "207 W. Bramblcton Ave.,
"Yards and mill Norfolk,
"Berkley, Va."
Has of ana 1 and?8?Sio, Vi Maln..Htrftftt_
Norfolk. Va. Specialties: Catarrh and all
diseases of Eye, Ear, No jo. Throat, Cheat
and Stomach.
Hours, 9 a. m. to 12:2* p. m.: 2 p. m. to
C:30 p. m. Sunday Hours, 10:30 a. m. to
12:30 p. m. Tuesday night and Thursday
night, 7:30 p. m. to 8 p. m. j
Consultation always free. Modlcines
furntahed. Terms always moderate. Eyes
examin&d for glasses free of charge.
L. H. WH1TEHURST
Wishes to call the attention of his cus?
tomers and the public generally to the
fact that his fall stock Is very large, new
and attractive.
COATS
Forty different styles to show you.
CAPES
In Golf, Plush and Plain Cloth,
F?RS
A very large line to select from.
DRESS GOODS
In tho leading styles?Black and Col?
ored. Fall S'llta In a larse vari-sty.
Blankets ranging from il.19 to $9.00 per
pair.
Underwear, In Gents', Ladles' and Chil?
dren's.
Flannels, in Wool, Canton, lljrrit and
heavy we'jrht.
Table Damask, Doylies, Napkins, Torr?
es. *c. All rotd at i<ot:om prlcts.
Your Inspection of my stock solicited.
L, H. Wliitehurst,
336 MAIN STREET.
Wow Phono 857._
SLAB WOOD"!
?GUARANTEED DRY AT?
C. E3. WHITE'S
147 KELLY AVENUE,
Special Price for' Large Quantities,
Both phones. my 28 eodom
HOTEL CHAMBERISn,
OLD POINT. VA.
OPENS ON EUROPEAN TLAN SEP?
TEMBER 15TII. v
\ ?' . ALAN F. CAMPBELL,
,'.nelO-lm ?' Manag?r.
SjCjHlOOjxS :AN D ? ,COULEGJ^Si.''
NORFOLK CONSERVflTORYOF MUSIC.
m'bsbrs. Anton ''f;.'koerneiv: and y
CHARLES BORJES, DIRECTORS.
The management begs to unnouric*. tho
opening of the Conservatory of Musre, - -
Wednesday, Sept. 2?,- 1899.
Pupils can now bo ?nrollod for Vlkno. -
Organ, Harmony. String-and >Wtnd Tri
struiui-uls, Vtfco Culture, Elocution'and .
Dramatic Art. Painting In:Oil, Water and
China, German, French and>. Spanish
Languages. .\>v
For terms and particulars apply at THE -
CONSERVATORY, 1W Main.streot.,.Ti
selO-lm ?..
Leaclie-WoQil School for Youo3 Ladies
232 ORANBY STREET, NORFOLK, VA.
Twenty-eighth 'session ' begins'- October .'
2nd, lf?9. Best advantages In all de?
partments. Music, Art and Languages
specialties. A few buarders will be taken.
Circulars at book stores.
MISS A0NE8 DOUGLAS WEST,
Principal..
For personal interview call at the
school.
"SCHOOL OF SINGING."
Mr. WILLIAM RICHARD3 (late of
Roynl Academy of Music, London, Eng?
land), Director and Instructor In I Voloa
Culture and the "Art of Slnc^ng" in all,.
Its branches. V
For terms and other information ad-'r'
dress or apply at' Studio. Maconlo Tem
I ple.Freemauon street, Norfolk, Va.-Pupils''.
Recitals will be given during the season. ?
uolO-lm
MARY WASHINGTON COLLEGE; |
For Tounit Women and G!rl?.'Thorough
and complete coursi Of study. English
Branches, Languages, Art, Music,. Elocu?
tion and Physical Culture. Sossiera will -
begin September the 27th.
Miss VIRGINIA REYNOLDS, ....
Miss MARY BUCHANAN RANDOLPH./
Principals.. \
For other information address care P.' O.
Box 297. Norfolk. Va, For personal Inters
view after September the 1st, call at the ?
Mary Washington College, corner of
Granby street and College Place, Norfolk.
Jy27-2nt
Classical Prepiratory School for Boys
MISS HELEN WOOD ROGERS
?will reopen her School for Boys' MON?
DAY, October 2d. For further particulars
address her nt Orange, Va., care Mis*
Kemper; until September 23d nRer which
Urn* she can bo seen at No'. CO Bousjl
streot. Norfolk. Rul-sifij. wod-frl-lm
Ruptures '
and Trusses!
It Is not usually that a rupture can bo
cured, but aoiu* times It taken at Its early
stage and a Truss properly lltted, It fre?
quently makes n perfect cure and should
I it fall In thnt It prevents Its growing
' wor3o and keeps the afflicted one com
I fortnblc.
j Wo have had many years' oxperleneb In
titling Trusses, and our. lar.ua stock. of
thcs6 poods enables us to use Just the
correct one, and we guarnnteo our
. ... t ,
goods,
Big finis in Patent" Weines.
Strictly Cash.
In firtistic si Bi
Fflisf.? Parlor >
should contain one of our exquisitely in?
laid or open frame Parlor Suits, uphpl
stered In rich Dumask, In beautiful shades
of colors, that will tnnko tho TOUT EN?
SEMBLE of your rooms "like one grand
sweet song" in their harmony. We have
sinie handsome now designs in Par-lot1
Furniture at prices that will surprise you. '
Sam'l C Phillips,
Cheapest, Furniture, Stove and
Carpel House in the City.
; 331 to 337 Church St.. eppo, Freemason,
NORFOLK, VA. ' S
WHOLESALE & RETAIL
?FOR?
fiHD DOMESTIC USES.
, JJituminous, TotRS Creek, Vir
. ginia, Anthracite, Penn- ''.
sylvania.
The coal we handle Is strictly uniform
I and of llrst-class quality. :; .
Trigg ?l Wilmer
CITIZENS' BANK BUILDING AND 7-11
NIVISION STREET.
BOTH PHONES.

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