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The Wenatchee daily world. [volume] (Wenatchee, Wash.) 1905-1971, June 26, 1908, Image 1

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For State Land Commissioner I. A* Navarre* He's Honest and Efficient
THE
BEST
ADV.
MEDIUM
VOL. 11/ NO. 307.
Clean Your Capets Without
Taking Them Up
BY ELECTRICITY with op Duntley Vacuum Cleaaer. Call at our
office and see demonstration. Cleans without dust.
Wenatchee Electric Co.
ESTABLISHED
1892
CAPITAL
$100,000
Columbia Valley Bank
Wenatchee,
MOW IS THE TIME TO
have that screen door made. * Call on
Geo. E. McCann
for quick and satisfactory Columbia st.; next door to laundry.
THE WENATCHEE WOODWORKING PLANT.
ESTES VALLEY ORCHARDS
Now jbn the Market
$150 to $350 Per Acre
\ /
IF. ESTES, Owner
Cashmere,
CANADIAN PACIFIC
f MI! LANDS
j Famous Bow River Valley
SOUTHERN' ALBERTA
irrigated Alfalfa, Timothy and Sugar Beet Lahds; Xon-Irrigated
Wheat Lands producing up to anc} over
\ 50 BUSHELS PER ACRE.
First Special Excursion leaves Spokane June 26.
For Special Reduced Round Trip Rates, write us immediately.
Land sold on loirg time with 6 per cent interest.
G. A- YANCEY & CO.
GENERAL AGENTS.
618 Riverside Avenue Spokane, Wash.
Creating a Reserve
is not difficult once you start to save
money systematically. But if you
ever erp&!t*T&>4t(s independent finan
cially through yohr own efforts you
must MAKE A START. Money
saved and put away safely will pro
tect you from misfortune and pre
pare you to take advantage of op
portunities that will surely come to
you.
Insures Your Future
Choose the right place to put your
capital. We pay 4 per cent interest
on savings accounts, payable semi
annually, and issue Certificates of De
posit for six or twelve months draw
ing 4 per cent interest.
Washington
THE WENATCHEE DAILY WORLD, WENATCHEE, WASHINGTO N, FRIDAY, JUNE 26, 1908.
CAN WE REGULATE 1
HOLIES
BRYAN SAYS NOT—PUBLIC MUST
EITHER OWN* THEM OR DE
STROY THEM.
"Those who advocate government!
control of trusts go half-way to so-|
cialism," said Mr. Bryan, "for they;
are granting the socialistic conten- i
tion that there is an economic advan- j
tage in monopoly. They not only de
clare against competition as a regu
lating force; they eliminate all ques
tions but two:
"First: Whether the benefits of
monopoly shall be enjoyed by all the
people or only by a few; and they
will hardly contend in the open for
the few. (So that we come to the
Second: Whethere the state canj
secure to the people, by regulation!
the benefits of monopoly. And if mo- j
nopoly is good and it can't be regu-l
lated, then public ownership is in-1
evitable.
"And I believe that regulation of |
monopolies will be found impossible j
Their interests are so large, I their
power is so concentrated, their means
SO ample to corrupt and to force out
competition, that, the monopolists
will have constantly an advantage
ovr the people at large."
If regulation is impossible, what
then are we to do? Mr. Bryan said:
"First, we must strengthen the
!representative character of the gov
ernment by electing senators by di
rect vote of the people.
"Second, as to the railroads and j
other natural monopolies, we must
try faithfully and fairly to regulate,
i them till they have taught the peo
ple that they cannot he regulated. j
j "Third, as to the other, the artifi-'
rial monopolies, we must exterminate
them and return to the competitive
system, and the ways to exterminate j
these trusts are several." He gave
them.
<1) Enforce the criminal laws.
(2) Tariff reform. "I would put'
IOS the free list foreign-made articles
[In competition with domestic trustj
made articles."
(3) "But the most effective way is
a national license; not like the pres-;
(dears; his would embarrass legiti
mate and help illegitimate, corpora
tions. It. is possible to require a li
cense for corporations controlling,
say 25 per cent. This would leave
the small corporations untouched.
No" more than one in a thousand
would be required to take out a li
cense. But a licensed corporation
should act under federal supervision j
'ill it controls, say. r.o per cent of the]
product. Then forbid its further
erowth." — Everybody's.
Miss Pearl E. Jones, daughter of
D. W. Jones, is home from Seattle,
where she has been attending high
school.
Jak<> Moore Comes Home.
J. K. Moore, formerly a jeweler in
this city, but who left the. town
three years ago for a wild • goose
chase over the United Slates, is back
in town.
Jake's eyes have been bulging out
ever since he returned in looking
over the changes in town since his
iepartnre. He now says that he
wishes that he had stayed.
Washington
C. Will Schaffer. a former Wenat
chee boy, now state librarian at
Olympia. is in town this week.
Special meetings will be held at
the Salvation Army Hall, commenc
ing this evening and continued un-il
•further notice. The local force will
be assisted in the meetings by Mr.
Lee, who comes from Spokane and
Colfax, where he has been holding
very successful services. He is a
speaker of force and ability, having
held for years some of the choice
pulpit appointments in Oregon and
Washington. Services will begin at
8 p. Bfc All have been invited to
attend.
Mrs. Kit Lie Turner, daughter of
W. H. Scott, returned the other clay
to her home in Granite Falls aft■■}.• a
three weeks' visit in the valley. On
her return she was accompanied by
her brother, Chester Scott, who will
spend a couple of weeks on the
The Royal Highlanders danced
Wednesday night. A good crowd was
present and the regular good time
which has characterized the dances
by this organization was had. The
committee in charge were Miss Stella
Tyrrell and Messrs. C. H. Armstrong,
c E. Buttles and T. C. Godfrey.
""""br L. B. flJaricnester, dental office,
Columbia Building."*
cm sews
L. V. Wells and wife returned to
day from an extended trip through
the east. Part of the time they
spent in Baltimore where they at
tended the general conference of
the Methodist church.
The reception tendered to Mr. and
Mrs. G. C. Humphreys and to Mr.
j and Mrs. G. B. Palmquist at Sprague
j hall Wednesday night was a most
| enjoyable, affair. The reception was
j given by the Rebekah lodge in honor
jof those two newly married couples.
In the evening following the band
concert in the park the members of
the band marched to the hall and
furnished music for the occasion.
P. Davis, of the Lamb-Davis Lum
ber company, of Leavenworth, is re
ported to be in a critical state of
health. He returned to Leaven
worth yesterday from Seattle where
he had been for sometime. A spe
cial car brought niin across the
mountains.
H. F. Hubbard of Entiat is in town
today.
1111 ill
IS KILLED
NEGRO MEETS DEATH UNDER
WHEELS OF GREAT NORTH
ERN* PASSENGER
An unknown man -was killed in
Wenatchee last night by being run
over by the Great Northern Passen
ger train westbound. His body is
now at the undertaking parlors of
E. F. Sprague awaiting interment.
No one saw the accident, but the
rrrn;:Tis of the wounded man were
heard as soon as the train had
passed. R. H. Xowlan. who saw the
man after the accident gives the fol
lowing account.
"The man had evidently tried to
catch the rods under the train as It
moved out of town. In the dark
he had most probably thought the
train had started west when it had
in reality started to back up to do
some switching."
The groans of the man could he
heard from the express pfflee when
the accident occurred clear up to
town. On eroinc to his side it was
found that one leg had been severed
from his body and that he was in
jured in the head.
Dr. Cnlp was called and adminis
tered to the man's needs, but he nev
er regained consciousness and died
at three o'clock.
ROOSEVELTIAN POLICY
WJIVT THE PRESIDENT OW A
CRE-Vr CORPORATION SAYS
OF IT.
Prorio , itdy-, pfter panics, heads of
great ce-i potations have ignore:! Ihe
lu.blh-'s natuial interest in fuMre
possibilities and have refused infor
mation. Xot so today. Judge E. if.
Gary, th 71 president of the T'ni'ed
States Steel corporation, has recent
ly shown admirable frankness on the
questions of the business outlook
and the relations of his company to
the so-called new dispensation or
Rooseveltia policy. Judge Gary
saH:
"I am an optimist; forced to be
one by the conditions of the country
as I see them. We have been travel
ing in the clouds of uncertainty and
distrust. Sometimes it has been dif
ficult to distinguish the way; but
soon the clouds will beg-n to disap
pear and are shall see that we are on
the mountaintop 'of (o-i'mrtunity.
This country produces from fhe
srround annually not less than ten bil
lion dollars in value, and a larse
portion of this consists of necessities
which the of this conn try and
n'ther cc ■need and will pay
frr. -whi lo - "ortion of our ex-1
penditures for consist
or luxuries. A little economy for the
n°\t twelve will result in the
retention in his country of the pro
ceeds of the balance of trade, and
we shall bare ample funds for our
business necessities. Tn spite of the
demagogue or the anarchist —and
one is about a s bad as the other —
this coun'rv is going to he success
ful and prn=-r>erous."
On the second point Judge Gary
said:
"Freque-itly remarks of a personal
character are made in jest which are
supposed to be made In earnest. I
do not deal in personalities. I do
rot believe, in vituperation nor In
fulsome praise. There are questions
under consideration at this time of
the greatest importance. They re
late to the effect of the utterances i
and action of the President upon
business conditions. I do not hesl- j
tate to state in public that the policy
of the present administration, crlti-j
cised by some and praised by others,
has had a great personal influence j
upon your president (Judge Gary
himself) who occupies a position of
responsibility. The declarations of
the president have increased the feel
ing of responsibility of many of us
toward our competitors, our custo
j mers, our employes, and the. public
generally. In my opinion business is
done on a better basis and on a high
er plane because of the conduct and
example of the President; and it is
due to him that an acknowledgment
of this fact be made by those who
,are affected." —Appleton's Magazine.
Will Ship Cherries to Paris.
D. W. Jones has received an order
for cherries, to be shipped to Paris.
Attracted by the excellence of the
fruit in the valley a traveler has left
the order with Mr. Jones to be filled,
and regardless of the cost of the
fruit will be sent to the capital of
France. A number of boxes of the'
fruit is now on display in the win
dow of "The Palmetto." Mr. Jones
came here recently from Seattle and
is already a great booster for the
valley.
M.-P, SPACE
SELECTED
SECRETARY OF THE COMMER
CIAL CLUB RETURNS FROM SE
ATTLE WHERE HE SELECTED
PLACE FOR LOCAL EXHIBIT.
; D. N. Gellatly, secretary of the
I Wenatchee Commercial club, return
ed this morning from Seattle where
Ihe went for the purpose of making
; arrangements in regard to the We
! natchee exhibit which will be made
at the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific exhibi
tion.
; The space selected will cover the
same floor room as the exhibit from
j Walla Walla and Yakima. The space
I will be 15 feet deep by 40 feet long.
! Mr. Gellatly states that the worK
on the grounds for the big exposi
tion is progressing rapidly, and that
hundreds of men are kept busy.
I
No Chance to Sign.
"Henry Mcßride will sign a rea
sonable local option law," remarks
the Bellingham Reveille. The chances
are very great that he will not be
placed in a position where he will
have occasion to sign a local option
or any other law. —Granite Falls
Post.
THE BIG GNS
IS HERE
CROWDS FILL THE STREETS OF
WENATCHEE TO SEE THE ELE
PHANTS.—TRAIN DELAYED.
The elephant is here.
With him is the camel, the drome
dary, the lion, the tiger, the tinsel
clothed men.
And to receive Wenatchee's first
big show, when the train pulled in,
was the übiquitous small boy.
Upon the news of the arrival of
the train the town was fairly agog
with excitement to see the big show,
with all of the spectacular glory that
goes wish it.
"By Gum!" said the grizzled vet
eran who saw Barnum's circus fifty
years ago, "it is jest the same as it
wuz then —only it's better."
The train got in a little after one
O'clock. Hardly had the train ar
rived before a crowd assembled to
watch the big tents go up.
The show arrived too late to giv.t
the parade. The day, unfortunately,
has been very dusty, and grea
clouds of it swept down Fifth street
where the unloading is being done
Notwithstanding the dust, hundred;
of people spent hours this afternoor
at the tracks to see the unloading.
The big show will be pulled off
tonight.
Horse .Scared to Death.
Frank Haynes. of Coulee City, lost
a valuable horse last Monday in a
peculiar manner. He was tied to a
hitching post in front of the hotel
when Mr. Yancey and Mr. Kummer
came by in an automobile on their
way to Spokane. They stopped and
one of them entered the hotel. The
sight of the auto seemed to frighten
the horse and Frank stepped to his
head to pacify him. The horse
seemed to tremble with fear, and at
once sank down, dying Instantly,
supposedly from fright.—Waterville
Press.
Every pall of %>ure white lard
'guaranteed; €«.•••
READ
THB
WANT
ADS.
5c PER COPT,
MORE RAILROAD
NEWS
WATERVILLE EMPIRE SAYS A
DEAL IS OX CONCERNING MOS
ES COULEE BRANCH.
The Rir, Bend Empire of Water*
vi'.le says:
Major A. M. Anderson, right-oN
way agent for the Great Northern
J railway, has been in Watervllle and
I the surrounding country for the past
ten days engaged in buying right of
j way for the Washington & Great
; Northern railway along their line of
survey up Moses Coulee and north
east from Douglas through the big
wheat country.
Practically all the right of way
j from fifteen miles northeast of Wa
! terville to the Great Northern at
i Columbia Siding has been purchased
]or contracted for and as a general
rule the farmers through whose land
the line runs are willing to take a
' reasonable price for their land, yet
i there are always those who, when
i there is no chance for a xailroad. are
j willing to give several acres for a
I right of way, but when the railroad
i wants to boy they want two or three
! times what the land is worth.
| However, Mr. Anderson believes
he will experience very little trou
i ble in securing a right of way all
j all along the. route at a reasonable
I figure, and of course where he is un
! able to do so the same will be settled
in court.
i While the buying of the righ' of
! way does not necessarily mean that
the road will be built at once, yet we
are informed by Mr. Anderson that it
is the intention to begin the work of
grading in a few weeks, or just 38
; soon as the necessary tools can be
got on the ground, and the road
completed at an early date as possi
ble. This cannojt he accomplished
this year, but It is believed that tho
| read will be ready to move next
' year's crop.
j The chief constructing engineer
spent several days inspecting the
; route, last week and will return
rgain shortly to further inspect md
oversee the work.
Since the arrival of thi se gentle
men in the country everybody has
been talking railroad and there has
heen various reports as to where the
line Would run. It has been intimat
ed by some that Waterville would be
off the map, the road not running
nearer than from four to ten miles.
Bat, personally, we are not alarmed
about this, believing that when the
road builds Waterville will be con
certed with if.
There has been some difficulty be
i tween the Washing'on & Great
[Northern and the Northern & South
ern ompany, both of whom have a
I survey throueh the coulee, but. we
understand that this has been ad
' justed to the satisfaction of both.
PUN FOR
ALASKA TRIP
WINNFRS IN WORLD'S CONTEST
MET LAST NIGHT.—START IN
JULY.—R. p. WEBB WILL BE
CHAPERONE.
At the parlors of Chewawa Hotel
last night the winners of the Alas
ika trips given by the World met to
; gether for the first time. Plans
| were made in reference to the trip
[which will be made in July,
j Those present at the. meeting
•were Miss Maud Pruett of Chelan,
Miss Ruby Webb and Miss Faun
Wells of Wenatchee. the winners In
the recent contest; R. P. Webb, who
will chaperone. the party to Alaska,
I Mrs. R. J. Rockey, who managed the
! contest; O. A. Hoag, who conducted
j Miss Pruett's campaign at Chelan,
i and Rufus Woods, editor of the
: World.
Miss Pruett will leave tonight for
Seattle, where she will spend some
time prior to leaving for Alaska.
The party will meet at the Butler
Hotel on the evening of July 11, and
from there will hoard the steamer of
j the Alaska Steamship company,
j which will carry them to the frigid
| fields of the north.
A flagpole has been erected on
the northeast corner of the Colum
bia Valley bank. It Is a steel one,
and baa a large ball on top. This is
the first one to be erected in Wenat
chee and will attract attention when
the national emblem is unfurled
from it.
To latroAese m/ work, f will do
free for the* fitst three
ladles calling
Block, onNSat ri %i!mklDmW*zT.
s MT%&&fYSE D. WOOD,

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