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The Wenatchee daily world. [volume] (Wenatchee, Wash.) 1905-1971, March 11, 1909, Image 1

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86072041/1909-03-11/ed-1/seq-1/

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FIELD IS
NORTH
CENTRAL
WASH
INGTON.
VOL. IV. NO. 206.
AFFIRMED DECISION 11
LEADERS ■HII
District of Columbia Court of Appeals
Rules on the Case of the American
Federation of Labor—Holds Former
Decision Good—Gompers and Mit
chell to Serve Jail Sentence.
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, March 11—The court
of appeals in the District of Columbia
today modified and affirmed the opin
ion of Justice Gould of the supreme
court of the district, enjoining the
American Federation of Labor, Sam
uel Gompers and other defendants
from publishing on "We don't pat
COMMERCIAL CLUB
WAS ORGANIZED
C. B. REED PULLED OFF QUITE
A STUNT IN LITTLE TOWN
' SOUTH OF THE CITY ON MON
DAY EVENING.
Chas. B. Reed, one of the best
booVters of a valley noted for Its
boosters, is responsible for the or
ganization of a commercial club at
Malaga Monday evening. He hap
pened to drop into the store there,
and without any ceremony, said:
"Boys, let"s organize a commercial
club. I move that Mr. Hamilton be
made temporary president." The mo
tion was carried, everybody voting
but none knowing the definite object
of the meeting or the scheme in the
mind of Mr. Reed. Anyway the
club was organized, temporary offi
cers elected and a membership roll of
fourteen has been secured already.
A permanent organization will be
effected some time next week, and it
is expected that quite a delegation
from here will go down and help
get the new club started.
TAKE OFF MEXICAN
DUTY ON WHEAT
El Paso, Texas, March 11. —Mexico
will declare off all wheat duties by
April 1, in order to prevent a bread
famine, according to a customs of
ficial here. Wheat now costs $6.60
in money, per bushel, in
Mexico City when it is imported from
the United States and the home crop
is exhausted. Amreican wheat at the
border costs $1.28 per bushel, with
20 cents gold duty and freight rates
to Mexico. The price is exhorbitant.
i
Hi WRECKED
BY BANDITS
(By Associated Press.)
Monroe. La.. March 11.—As a re
sult of the work of train wreckers,
the south bound express on the Ar
-1
Kansas. Louisiana & Gulf railroad
-was derailed 20 miles north of the
city shortly before midnight last
nigh . The engineer was killed and
th« fireman seriously injured. No
passengers were among the injured.
ifetmJfftetf Hails Wotlh
ronize list" the name of the Buck
Stove & Range Co., of St. Louis. The
decree was modified to the extent
that there should be eliminated from
the decree the restriction of the la
bor organization and other defend
ants from "mentioning, writing or
referring to the business of the Buck
Stove & Range Co. or Its customers.
Otherwise the decree was affirmed.
FORM METHODIST
BROTHERHOOD
THIRTY-FIVE MEN TOOK INITI-
ATORY STEPS LAST NIGHT AT
METHODIST CHURCH—EXPECT
100 MEMBERS.
Last evening 35 men met in the
parlors of the Methodist church to
take preliminary steps in the forma
tion of a Methodist brotherhood In
connection with that denomination.
The meeting was called to order by
Fred Kemp, who acted as temporary
chairman and explained the purpose
and aims of an organization of this
character. He was delegated by
Bishop Hughes who presided over the
conference recently held here to per
form this duty. Before proceeding
to business a light luncheon was
served, which was prepared by the
men of the cnurch.
Following the remarks of the pre
siding officer, a temporary organiza
tion was formed, I. R. Brubaker be
ing elected secretary. On motion a
committee, consisting of Guilford
Marr, L. V. Wells and I. W. Reeves,
was appointed by the chair to formu
late plans for the organization and
to report to the next meeting the
names of a permanent set of officers.
The concensus of opinion of those
present was that an organization of
this character is needed in the
church, and brief addresses were
made by the pastor, Rev. H. L.
Beightol, and others.
Membership in the organization
will not be confined to members of
the church, but will include all men
of the congregation. It is thought
that the brotherhood will start out
with a membership of over 100 men.
The next meeting will convene on
the call of the pastor of the church.
This makes the second organiza
tion of this kind to be launched this
week, the men of the Presbyterian
church having taken preliminary
steps to the formation of one last
Monday evening.
Chicago, March 11. —Following
moderately firm opening, wheat turn
ed weak today, owing to free sales
by several of the leading commission
houses. May declined nearly one
cent from, the previous close. May
opened at $1.15 7-8 to $1.14%.
Early in the day May dropped to
$1.13%.
Washington — Fair tonight and
Friday, except possible showers along
the coast; easterly winds.
THE WENATCHEE DAILY WORLD, WENATCHEE, WASHINGTON, THURSDAY, MARCH 11, 1909.
Wheat Prices Dropped.
(By Associated Press.)
Clear Day Tomorrow.
(By Associated Press.)
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAUGHT MAN 10
ROBBED BOAT
FRANK RYAN WHO ROBBED
STEAMER OKANOGAN LAST
OCTOBER CAPTURED YESTER
DAY IN CITY OF SPOKANE.
Last fall Frank Ryan, who at that
# time was night watchman of the
steamer Okanogan, decamped with
$60 of the company's money. On the
night of October 15 he broke open
the money till on the boat and from
that day until yesterday the officers
have had no clue of the missing man.
Evidently he had been arrested at
Spokane on some charge and when
put in the sweating room he bad con
fessed to the robbery here. The lo
cal officers were communicated with
and Chief Inscho wired to hold the
man.
Ryan is but a young man. He
had been employed with the boat
company but a short time when he
decamped. It is expected that he
will be brought back here tonight
and will be charged with larceny.
Dl» MINERS
WAGE SCALE
(By Associated Press.)
Philadelphia. March 11. —Repre-
sentatives of the United Mine Work
ers of America and presidents of the
coal carrying roads met today in the
offices of President Baer of the Read
ing company, to consider negotiations
for a new agreement to go into effect
at the expiration of the present work
ing agreement March I. Good feel
ing prevails on both sides and pros
pects are bright for reaching an
agreemnt without resorting to radi
cal actions.
The conterence adjourned at noon,
after the miners submitted their de
mands and after the sub-committees
on each side were appointed to take
up negotiations. The sub-committees
met later in the day.
The Reading company had ar
ranged a luncheon for the mine
workers, who numbered about 35,
but most of them refused to accept
the hospitality and said. "I don't
want their grub, I can buy my own."
Ml CULL 01 &■
OF $11LFMIE
(By Associated Press.)
Olympia, March 11.—A new reso
lution charging malfeasance in office
of the insurance commissioner and
providing for a legislative investgat
ing committee was introduced in the
house today. Representative Scott, of
RAISE CONFEDER
ATE TORPEDO BOAT
(By Associated Press.)
New Orleans. March 11.—That ar
rangements have been completed to
raise the first torpedo boat of the
confederacy from the bottom of Lake
Pontchartrain was Announced at a
meeting of the confederate veterans
last night. The boat was lying near
a Spanish fort, where ft went down
years ago. It is proposed to place
the vessel on the lawn at the con
federate veteran soldiers' home in
New Orleans.
CLAIM INTEREST
RATES I HIGH
O. B. FULLER GIVES REASONS
WHY MORE HOUSES AND BUSI
NESS BLOCKS ARE NOT ERECT
ED IN THE CITY.
"I'll tell you why there are not
more houses and business blocks
erected in this city," said O. B. Ful
ler today. "In Seattle, Tacoma and
in fact most every place, the build
ings are put up mostly on credit.
Money for such work is furnished by
the capitalists and it is not on 8 to
10 per cent money either. The trou
ble with us fellows here who own
the lots is that money rates are too
high here. A man cannot build two
and three story buildings in this city
on high rates of interest and make
it a paying investment. I do not
know why t is, but it is possible
to sell our school and municipal
bonds for 4 to 5 per cent, yet when
we want to >orrow a little money on
which to t ect buildings that will
improve th<* city we have to pay S
to 10 per cent. Until we can get
the rates of interest down to a rea
sonable figure- there is no need of
thinking that we are going to have
any great amount of business blocks
built here. I think that this is a
good chance for missionary work by
the Commercial club. We need more
houses and more business buildings:.
We want to be put in touch with mci
who have 4, 5 and 6 per cent money
to loan."
Mr. Full* stated that his firm, the
Wenatchee Realty company, owns
feetfrentage on that portion
of Wenatchee avenue which it is pro
posed to pave and otherwise im
prove. This is about one-ninth of
the total frontage and will cost some
money but Mr. Fuller says that there
will be no kick from his firm on
legitimate street improvement, be
lieving that it is money well ex
pended. (
Convicted of Petty I>areeny.
D. P. Way was convicted in the
court of Judge Palmer yesterday on
the charge of petty larceny. Garney
Bowers was the complaining wit
ness. The trouble arose from the
purloining of two bales of wire from
the old John Dill place on the Co l
ockum. Way was found guilty and
was assessed $10 and costs.
Adams county, announced that the
resolution was drawn at the sugges
tion of Acting Governor Hay, and
unless it was adopted the governor
will call an extra session of the
legislature. The house took a nooa
recess with the resolution still under
consideration.
AFTER SLICK
MINING OPERATOR
(By Associated Press.)
Spokane. March 11.—ChicagJ
stockholders of the Amador Mmm?
company, in Montana, just across the»
iline from Wallace, claim D. E. Ma<-
kinnon has squandered in salaries
and fees about $300,000 obtained by
a 2-cent assessment of the company's
stocks levied last October. They have
brought suit and an injunction re
straining the sale of stock for unpaid
assessments.
Hi IUI SIGHED THE
BRIDGE DILIISMORNING
Despite Report That Chief Executive
Was Opposed to Measure It is a Law
---Commercial Club Was Presented
With Pen With the Bill Was
Signed—Reception to Holm.
The report was current on the
street yesterday that Governor Hay
had threatened to veto the Columbia
river bridge bill, yet the following
message was received this morning
from Arthur Gunn, at Olympia:
"Governor signed bridge bill this
morning. He presented the pen with
which it was signed to Commercial
club."
This dispels all doubts on the mat
ter as soon as the legal formalities
can be complied with the title will
pass to the state.
A great deal of anxiety was mani
fested here yesterday regarding the
probable action of Mr. Hay. It has
been common knowledge that Act
ing Governor Hay, Speaker Meigs
and President of the Senate Ruth
were opposed to the bridge bill. Mr.
Hay stated, however, that he would
not openly fight it and would sign the
bill if it passed. Word came yester
day that he had threatened to veto
It and Mr. Hay was not a very popu-
CHIMB
mi mm we
(By Associated Press.)
Portland, March 11. —The Evening
Telegram will say today that radical
changes in the management of the
Harriman lines will soon be an
nounced. It is known that Vice
President and General Manager
O'Brien of the Harriman system in
the northwest, with headquarters in
Portland, is now on his way to Los
Angeles to be present at a-confer
ence which will include Mr. Harri
man, Vice President and General
Manager E. E. Calvin, of the South
ern Pacific. President J. T. Haraban,
of the Illinois . Central, and Julius
Krutschnitt, vice president and di
rector of maintenance of operation
of the Harriman lines. The Evening
Telegram says that as a result of this
conference Mr. O'Brien will succeed
Mr. Calvin as general manager of
the Southern Pacific and that this
promotion will involve Mr. O'Brien's
transfer to San Francisco; that Mr.
Calvin will go to Chicago as general
manager of the Illinois Central, and
that in all probability President Har
ahan of the Illinois Central will g(%
to New York and assume an import
ant executive position with the New*
York Central, of which Harriman is
director.
Kaufman Has No Chance
(By Associated Press.)
New York, March 11. —James J.
Jeffries said today that Al. Kaufman,
who challenged him last night for
the heavyweight championship, has
no chance of getting a fight with
him, nor had "any other white man,"
and said: "If Johnson had been a
white man I would have remained
in retirement all my life."
Taft Not to Visit the Coast
(By Associated Press.)
Astoria, Ore.. March 11. —Presi-
dent Taft has written the Chamber
of Commerce that he is not certain
that he will visit the northwest this
year, as heretofore announced.
Tin
puna
APPLfI
DISTRICT
OF THB
5c PER COPY.
lar governor for a day anyway. It is
likely, now that he has signed the
bill and presented the pen to the
Commercial club, that he will be re
stored to the good graces of the
citizens of Wenatchee valley.
It is the intention to give Repre
sentative Holm a reception after his
return from Olympia. He wired yes
terday that he expects to arrive here
Sunday afternoon, and it is likely
that the. reception and banquet will
be given him at the Commercial club
rooms next Monday night. Mr. Holm
has not made a spectacular figure in
the legislature but has played the
game very satisfactorily, in that he
got the big things that he went after.
He did not bitterly engage in the
local option fight. He voted with
the "drys," but had friends in both
camps who voted with him on the
bridge bill.
The people of the valley will show
their appreciation of his work at the
reception next Monday.
SPRAGUE MAN
WAS BUNCOED
(By Associated Press.)
Los Angeles, March 11. —The po
lice arrested two men known as J. D.
Ward and Bud Clayborn, and will
charge them with working a fake
horse race on W. G. Mitchell, a cat
tle raiser of Sprague, Washington,
by which Mitchell is said to be out
of pocket $10,000. The alleged fake
took place yesterday on a vacant lot
between Arcadia and Monrovia, and
so cleverly was it worked that Mit
chell believed even after his money
was gone that he was a victim of
chance rather than a bunco game,
and he refused to give information
until after he himself was arrested
and sweated. The money was not
recovered but the police say they
have men who have it under surveil
lance.
BOUGHT PIKE ORCHARD
Wenatchee Realty Company Becomes
Owner of Nine-Acre Orchard
on Avenue.
The Wenatchee Realty company
this week purchased the nine-acre
bearing orchard tract of Oscar Pike,
'this is one of the fine orchards of
North Wenatchee avenue. It will be
subdivided and placed on the market
by the real estate company.
Mr. Pike still retains four acres
on the east side of the avenue.
Irish Songs Tonight.
An evening with Ireland and her
songs will be given tonight at the
Eagle hall. This is for the benefit
of the W. C. T. U. Reading Room.
Professor Browhell has charge of the
musical program and will be assist
ed by a four-piece orchestra.
Coast Wheat.
(By Associated Press.)
Tacoma, March 11.—Milling Blue
stem, $1.16; export Bluestem, $1.15;
Club, $1.05; Red, $1.01.

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