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The Wenatchee daily world. [volume] (Wenatchee, Wash.) 1905-1971, March 12, 1909, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86072041/1909-03-12/ed-1/seq-1/

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FIELD IS
NORTH
' CENTRAL
WASH
INGTON.
VOL. IV. NO. 207.
U MONEY IS
ALMOST RAISED
COMMITTEE HAS $5,700 OF THE
$7,000 RAISED FOR PROPOSED
COMMERCIAL CLUB BUILDING
—LOT DEAL PENDING.
Messrs. Wiester, Webber and Hair
ing, the committee in charge of rais
ing the funds for the new Commer
cial club building, are meeting with
very good success. Pledges to the
amount of $5,700 have been made
and it is assured that by Monday
night, at the time of the regujar
monthly meeting, that the full am
oua*\will be subscribed.
The matter of the purchase of tt/e
Gilchrist corner for the club site is
still pending. It is thought that
something definite will be done to
day. A purchaser for the Mission
street lots belonging to the club has
been found and it is thought that
the option on the Gilchrist property
can be taken up soon.
COAL MINERS
IN CONVENTION
(By Associated Press.)
Philadelphia, March 12.—The sub
committee of anthracite mine work
ers and operators will hold another
meeting this afternoon to endeavor
to reach an agreement to go into ef
fect at the expiration of the prfesent
working agreements. The flat re
fuel of the operators to make any
oflticessions greatly depressed the
representatives of the miners, who
.today make answer to the oper
ators to offer to renew the present
agreement. A convention of the an
thracite miners may be called or
the international executive board may
be asked to decide upon the policy
to be pursued.
The anthracite miners have reject
ed the proposition of the operators
to renew the present agreement for
three years.
It looks as if one side or the other
would have to recede from its posi
tion or there will be a suspension of
work on April 1. The operators to
day had nothing to say regarding the
situation. It is known, however, that
they do not intend to change their
attitude.
II LOOKS II
SPEAKER CANNON
(By Associated Press.)
Washington. March 12. —President
Taft had a conference today with
Speaker Cannon and Senators Burton
and Nelson and former Representa
tive Watson. Cannon would not talk
far publication.
*X"We have got them licked. This
1s a statement of fact and not pre
diction." said Watson, having refer
ence* to the position of the "regulars"
In the house in their skirmish with
the -"insurgents."
BIG TAX COLLECTIONS
County Treasurer Battles reports
the largest collection of taxes yes
terday of any day in the history of
the county. The Great Northern sent
in a check amounting to $71,600 and
that together with amounts from
other sources makes a grand total of
about $90,000. Additional help has
to be employed these days and the
office force is working to the full
limit of its capacity.
Washington Weather.
» (By Associated Press.)
Fair tonight, except showers in the
wt-st portion; south to east winds.
A VERY GOOD
an check
GREAT NORTHERN IS PROMPT
WITH PAYMENT OP TAXES
AND TREASURER BATTLES RE
CEIVED CHECK FOR $71,610.71.
The largest check ever received in
this county for taxes, and possibly
for any other purposes, was that re
ceived this morning by County Treas
urer Battles as payment by the Great
Northern for the 1908 realty taxes.
This is for 343.075 feet of main
track in this county and .for 89,847
vfeet of side track. This is on the
basis of $7.3682 per foot for the
main line, and the side track at
$1.4716 per foot.
The personal taxes, amounting to
some $5,200 was paid some time ago,
and the railroad company is now
right on the books.
The taxes are now coming in very
rapidly and the treasurer and his
deputies are working every night
and Sundays in order to keep the
records up to date.
FORCE MAYOR
TO RESIGN
Los Angeles, March 12.—The city
council met today and accepted the
resignation of Mayor A. C. Harper,
whose official and private life was
threatened with investigation unless
the resignation was forthcoming. The
action on the selection of a successor
was postponed to next Monday in or
der that advice may be had on the
question of whether an appointment
should be made to hold office until
March 26, the date of the recall elec
tion, at which a successor to Harper
would be elected, or to January 1,
the end of the present term.
REPORTS SMALL
POX EPIDEMIC
Spokane, March 12. —"An epi
demic of smallpox is sweeping over
the south half of Colville Indian res
ervation," states J. B. Valentine,
who just returned from the Upper
Columbia. "Dr. B. H. Latham, the
government physician ,at Nespelem,
Wash., has issued an order forbid
ding the ferryman to carry Indians
off the reservation or take white men
over the river to that region. Ad
vices state that the epidemic is se
vere and is sweeping over the res
ervation like wildfire."
METEOR IN CALIFORNIA
Sacramento. March 12.—A very
\ brilliant meteor fell north of this
city at 8:24 this morning. A meteor
I was also seen at Redding at 8:11
o'clock this morning, it being pre
sumed that the two were originally
pieces of the same body.
Redding, Cal.. March 12.—A mete
or of remarkable brilliancy was seen
in the northern sky at 8:11 this
morning. Despite the sunshine the
remarkable brilliancy and flash of
the strange light across the morning
sky was awe inspiring.
Chicago, March 12.—The wheat
prices were forced up about one cent
at the opening of the market today
on a rush to buy, following the sharp
advance at Liverpool, where the mar
ket was bullishly affected by Argen
tine statistics. May opened $1.15 7-8
to $1.16 1-8; July, $1.03 7-S to
$1.04 1-4.
THE WENATCHEE DAILY WORLD, WENATCHEE, WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 1909.
(By Associated Press.)
(By Associated Press.)
(By Associated Press.)
Wheat Market Up Again.
(By Associated Press.)
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MRS. JAMES SCHOOLCRAFT SHERMAN.
Mrs. Sherman, wife of the vice president elect, has occupied a conspicuous
place in Washington society for several years. She is a pecacaai friend of
Mrs. Koosevelt and Mrs. Taft and belongs to the inner circle at the White
House. She is an excellent entertainer, sharing her genial husband's persona/
popularity. Their Washington home will be the scene of many important
social events during the present season.
NEW ENGLANOERS
ME IN SPOKANE
INVITATIONS WILL BE ISSUED TO
(MM) RESIDENTS OF CENTRAL
WASHINGTON — A NUMBER
WILL GO FROM WENATCHEE.
Patriots' Day will be observed by
the New England club of Spokane
with an appropriate program at a
dinner in Masonic temple the evening
of April 19, when it is expected 600
former residents of Massachusetts,
Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont,
Connecticut and Rhode Island will be
in attendance. Invitations will be
sent to New Englanders at Wenat
chee. This was decided at the an
nual meeting in the assembly rooms
of the Spokane Chamber of Com
rmerce, when these officers were el
ected for 1909-10.
President, Frederick E. Goodall,
New Hampshire, president Spokane
Chamber of Commerce; vice presi
dent, Aubrey Lee White. Maine, vice
president Spokane & Inland Empire
Electric Railway system; secretary
treasurer. William D. Finley, Rhode
Island, Sunday editor the Spokesman-
Review; assistant, F. P. Tibbetts.
Massachusetts; honorary vice presi
dents, A. W. Doland, New Hamp
shire; George A. Martin, Maine; Dr.
John O'Shea. Massachusetts; M. A.
Wiley. Vermont; W. D. Finley,
Rhode Island; D. H. Whitehouse,
Connecticut; executive committee,
P. J. Webb, Massachusetts; J. B.
Rogers, Vermont; C. H. Merriam,
Maine; membership committee, E. R.
Crane, Maine; Finley H. Mason, New
Hampshire; H. C. Whitehouse, Mass
achusetts.
The club will keep "open house"
in Spokane during the Alaska-Yukon-
Pacific exposition at Seattle, from
June to October, when it is expected
to entertain a large number of prom
inent New Englanders on the way to
or returning from the fair, and dele
gates at the 17th session of the Na
tional Irrigation Congress, here Aug
ust 9 to 14. The club will also as
sist the Chamber of Commerce in
entertaining the Continentals of Wor
cester and the Board of Trade Glee
club of that city during their stay
of three days in Spokane next sum
mer.
"SfllS
ALL RECORDS ARE BROKEN BY
LEGISLATURE AT OLYMPIA BY
THE VAST EXPENDITURES
AUTHORIZED.
V—
Olympia, March 12. —Late yester
day afternoon the house passed the
general appropriation bill, known as
senate bill No. 386, appropriating
money for state institutions and de
partments. Only a few changes were
made in it as it came from the sen
ate, one being to provide a salary
for the woman deputy commissioner
of labor authorized by the Campbell
bill and to increase a few other
minor salaries. The total increases
in the house amount to $7,335, and
bring the total budget to $5,961,635,
as compared with $4,661,000 carried
by the corresponding bill of two
years ago.
The most notable work of the ses
sion included the passage of a "lib
eral" local option bill, an act sub
mitting the equal suffrage amend
ment to the vote of the people;
adoption of a complete criminal code
and abolishing of racetrack gambl
ing.
It exceeded all previous sessions in
amount of money appropriated, pro
vision being made for the expendi
ture of approximately $10,000,000.
Part of this total will, however, be
made up by the disposal of land re
sources and the issuance of state
bonds.
That he would use the ax liberally
on appropriations in order to keep
them within the estimated revenue
of the state was the statement made
this morning by Governor Hay, who
is determined to use his veto power
against any raid on the state treas
ury.
Arctic Owl Shot on John Day.
There is on exhibition in a window
of a store in Condon, Ore., an Arctic
owl, pure white, and very rare in
this part of the country. This own
was shot on the lakes beyond the
John Day river by Mark Portwood.
of Condon, who has had it mounted
and placed in a case, surrounded by
native bark and boughs. The owl is
full grown and is a very fine speci
men.
HAY WON FIGHT
FOR INVESTIGATION
COMMITTEES APPOINTED BY
HOUSE AND SENATE TO LOOK
INTO AFFAIRS OF INSURANCE
COMMISSIONER SCHIVELY.
(By Associated Press.)
Olympia, March 12. —The unflinch
ing courage, the bulldog tenacity and
the irresistable determination of Act
ing Governor Hay and his supporters
won out over the underground poli
tical organization and tactics of In
surance Commissioner Schively, Sec
retary of State Nichols and Land
Commissioner Ross, and their un
holy alliance with the "booze" com
bine in the legislature when the two
houses at midnight last night joined
in the adoption of a resolution au
thorized and empowered to investi
gate the conduct of all state officers.
This committee was appointed, un
der the terms of the resolution, by
the presiding officers of the respect
ive houses, each house confirming by
unanimous vote its appointees. The
committee consists of Senators Allen
of King and Fishback of Lewis, and
Representatives Taylor of King, Mc-
Master of King and Hubbell of Kitti
tas. This committee is given power
to hold sessions and summon wit
nesses and is instructed to make its
report to Governor Hay not later
than July 12, 1909.
Governor Hay is not entirely satis
fled with the personnel of the com
mittee, since the appointment of two
defenders of the accused officials on
a committee of five offer too much
opportunity for a whitewash.
RELATION OF
ROBERT 11
Miss Elizabeth F. Jarron, a grand
niece of Robert Fulton, inventor of
the first steamboat and a relative of
the late President Arthur, became
the bride of Edward D. Utter, at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Winans,
422 V 2 Sherman street, at 7 o'clock
last evening, says the Spokane Press.
The Rev. W. E. Armfield, an old-time
friend of the groom and pastor of
Grace Methodist church, officiated.
The bride is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. J. G. Jarron, 1017 Hyland
avenue, and the groom is a promi
nent member of the canton and a
well-known building contractor. The
bride was dressed in a beautiful
gown of white silk and wore her
mother's wedding regalia of years ago
Only a few of the intimate friends
and relatives df the contracting par
ties were in attendance and an infor
mal reception was given immediately
after tbe wedding.
Mr. and Mrs. Utter will leave in
a short time for Wenatchee, where
they will make their home. Mr. Ut
ter will likely take up fruit raising
with his brother. Rev. F. D. Utter,
the horticulturist.
DEPUTY SHERIFF
AFTER RYAN
Chas. Kenyon, deputy sheriff, went
to Spokane last night to bring back
with him Frank Ryan, the embez
zling C. & O. night watchman. Re
garding his capture, the Spokane
Press says:
"Frank Ryan's eagerness to escape
the police here yesterday afternoon
almost necessitated a gun play by
Officer Daniels to induce him to stop.
Ryan has been hunted by the Wenat
chee police for a considerable time,
and the officers were astonished when
he gave himself up.
He evidently regretted this for he
made a dash for the back door, and
only Daniels' threatened to shoot he
would have been off."
5c PER COPY.
A NICARAGUAN
SALVADORE WAR
MEXICAN PAPER ADVOCATES AN
NEXATION BY MEXICO OF FIVE
CENTRAL AMERICAN STATES
EXPECTS l\ S. INTERVENTION.
(By Associated Press.)
Mexico City. March 12.—There Is
a persistent rumor that war has bro
ken out between Nicaragua and Sal
vador and that there has been an
engagement between the Salvadorean
gunboat Presidente and the Nicara
guan gunboat Momotombo. The re
sult is unknown.
The Mexican government is with
out official advices regarding the
truth of the rumors. The Herald to
day advocates the annexation of the
five Central American states by Mex
ico. The general opinion here is that
intervention is inevitable and Mexico
looks to the United States to make
the initial move.
Washington, March 12.—Action
amounting practically to breaking off
of the diplomatic relations with Nica
ragua was taken by the state depart
ment this afternoon, when it ordered
Secretary of Legation Gregory, who
is in charge of affairs at Managua,
to return home, leaving the legation
in charge of the consul who will have
no diplomatic capacity.
HOUSE INDORSES
HAY'S VETO
REFVSESS TO OVERRIDE ACTION
ON THE PRESBY JUDICIARY
BILL CREATING TWO MORE
DISTRICTS.
(By Associated Press.)
Olympia, March 12. —The house,
by a vote of 39 to 40, last evening
refused to override the veto of Gov
ernor Hay of senate bill No. 177 by
Presby, providing for the appoint
ment of two additional superior
judges for southern Washington
counties. The veto message had been
overridden in the senate, 27 to 7.
one for the many elements in a grand
free-for-all trading and delivery com
bination perfected and conducted in
that body for several days past by
the saloon combine.
Senator Davis first voted no, but
when he saw that without his vote
the resolution would not have a ma
jority of all members he changed to
aye. His announcement was greeted
with a burst of applause from the
supporters of the resolution.
CLUB BUILDING
FOR MALAGA
Charles B. Reed, Malaga's invinc
ible boomer, suggests the idea of a
commercial club building for Malaga.
A commercial club is to be organized
by the residents of that section of
the valley within the next few days.
Nothing would be better than the
erection of a building to be used as
a lodge room, town hall and commer
cial club headquarters. I. M. Deri
field, owner of the Malaga townsite,
has already signified his willingness
to donate a lot for this purpose.
SIX YEARS EACH.
Charles Liskey, Alfred Wallis and
Walter Welch have been sentenced
at Klamath Falls, Ore., to six years
each in the penitentiary for horse
stealing. Welch was paroled on ac
count of turning state's evidence, on
account of the condition of his health
and in consideration of his future
good behavior.
TOT
PRIM
I
APPL*
DISTRICT
OF TOT

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