OCR Interpretation


The Wenatchee daily world. [volume] (Wenatchee, Wash.) 1905-1971, October 06, 1909, Image 1

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86072041/1909-10-06/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Wenatchee's Big Red Apple Daily
VOL. V NO. 70.
TWEHTY-THREE
BODIES RE
COVERED
ALL NIGHT LONG RESCUERS RE
MAINED AT WORK SEEKING
BODIES OF THE IMPRISONED
COAL MINERS.
Ladysmlth. B. C Oct. 6. —Twenty-
three bodies have been recovered
from the Extension mine, where the
explosion took place yesterday. Nine
others are still in the pit. It is ex
pected all will be brought out today.
Since long before dawn a crowd
of women with tense drawn faces,
many holding children by the hands,
have been awaiting the mine train
from the Extension, 12 miles away,
and when the train which carried a
hundred miners from their Ladysmlth
homes daily arrived, it brought 16
limp bodies on stretchers, covered
with sheets. A pitiful scene followed.
The other bodies will be brought
herfe as rapidly as they possibly can
be prepared for removal from the
scene of the disaster. All night long
rescuers kept at work seeking still
imprisoned bodies. There are many
caves where the coal has fallen in
the crosscuts and the work of res
cue is greatly hampered.
Clarence White, who body was
among the five recovered this morn
ing from No. 4 west level, gave his
life for a friend. The body was
found with his arm around J. Isma-s
ter, whom he had refused to leave.
White had wavered whether he would
follow Colter. Gilson, Radford and
others who were rescued, but finally
determined to remain with Ismaster,
and died with him, his arm about Is
master's body.
Purchased Interest in Bearimr Or
chard.
J. E. Scott. of Detroit. Mich., an
uncle of W. F. Lang of this city, has
a half interest in the Har
old-Gfpfcn fruit ranch, four miles
south of the city. The purchase in
cluded a half interest owned by Mr.
Harold. Colonel Joe Green still re
tains his Interest. The place consists
of about 190 acres of land. 75 acres
of which is just coming into bearing.
The price paid for the Harold Inter
est bjT'Mr. Scott was $15,000. The
sale was made by Smart Bros, of
Malaga.
> Death of Leßoy Pearl.
Leßoy Pearl, aged 12 yearß and 6
months, died yesterday at the Emer
gency hospital at 3:30. He was
moved to the hospital last Saturday
from his home on Columbia street,
where he and his sister have been
living with their uncle, David J. Dyer.
He was the son of Flora B. Pearl,
who died two weeks ago. The fu
neral services will be held tomorrow
afternoon at 2 o'clock, from the
Sprague & Ruppe undertaking par
lors. Interment will be in the family
lot in the Sunnyslope cemetery.
t
FOR BETTER NAVAL
. PROTECTION
San Francisco, Oct. 6.—President
Taft departed early today for a few
days of real rest at Yosemlte valley.
In spite of his great strength the
president was a weary man after 18
hours of almost constant entertain
ment, and retired for a few hours'
sleep at 2 o'clock this morning. It
had been a day and night of hurri
cane order into which he had crowded
three public speeches, a rapid trip
through three cities, laying a corner
stone, three receptions and a five
hour banquet. One of the features
of the banquet was the appeal of
Governor Gillett for a greater navy
and for maintenance on the Pacific
coast of a fleet of at least 16 battle
ships.
Traded Okanogan Ranch.
Ray L. Roderick has traded his
Okanogan ranch to Dwight Roys for
two lots on South Mission street in
this city.
Backward Social.
The Christian Endeavorers of the
Christian church will give a Back
ward social at the home of Miss
Nellie Buttles Thursday evening. AH
who wish to attend are requested to
meet at the church at S o'clock sharp.
Sold Half Interest in His Holdings.
C. E. Smith this week sold a half
crest in his 30-acre orchard tract
in East Wenatchee to C. W. Pugsley
for $6,500. The sale was made by
C. W. Halbert.
CHRISTIAN PASTOR
HAS RESIGNED
REV. A. J. ADAMS WILL GO TO
HOOD RIVER TO ACCEPT PAS
TORATE — HAS BEEN IN WE
NATCHKE THREE YEARS.
Rev. A. J. Adams, pastor of the
First Christian church of this c'ty,
has resigned and will go from here
to Hood River, Ore., to assume charge
of the church at that place. His
work in Hood River will begin on
November 1.
Rev. Adams has been in Wenatchee
for three years. At that time the
church had 65 members, and since
that time there have been 250 addi
tions. The Sunday school has in
creased from 4 Oto 165 members. An
extension indebtedness to the amount
of $500 has been paid off and plans
are now being made for the erection
of a new building to cost $5,500. So
one has been called to fill Mr. Adams'
place but it is expected that arrange
ments will be made for his successor
within a short time.
More Showers Due.
Washington—Probably fair in the
west portion; showers in the east
portion and cooler tonight. Thurs
day fair.
520,000 FOR THREE
ACRES
LOWEST PRICT? EUGENE PAGE
WILL SET ON HIS PLACF—
YOUNG TREES NET $2,000
EACH YEAR.
Of all the orchards in the Wenat
chee valley producing heavy crops
each year there are few that are
valued as highly by their owners as
that owned by Eugene Page, on We
natchee avenue. This place was pur
chased in 1902 from L. V. Wells by
Fred Obernolte for $3,800. This was
considered a high price. Fred Ober
nolte sold the place four years ago
to Eugene Page for $5,000.
Some of the trees are quite young
and a large percentaage of them were
not in bearing, but notwithstanding
that fact Mr. Page has taken enough
in the past four years from his or
chard to pay for It, This figure is
net and does not include the money
paid out for picking, packing and
marketing. Last year the three acres
netted $2,100. This year, which is
a poor one. the place will net $2,000
above expenses. He has 100 Black
Twigs 7 years old which this year
wil] produce $2,000 worth of fruit.
Four Arkansas Blacks from wh'ch he
has already averaged $42 each and
he has sold the fruit from 20 trees
of Winesaps that are only five years
"id for $300. These Winesaps will
be shipped to Australia. Mr. Pag-*
refused $15,000 for this place a year
ago. He says it is probably worth
$17,000 but that he Is holding it for
$20,000 and would not take any !-?ss.
5,000 Boxes from 12 Acres.
Hardman Bros., who have charge
of the Z. A. Lanham orchard this
year, expect to pick 5,000 boxes of
apples from the 12 acres, 500 of the
trees will average 15 boxes per tree.
The apples are of the Ben Davis Va
riety, for which they will receive
51.35 per box. Last year they picked
10,000 boxes for which they received
60 cents. Two years ago they picked
5,600. which they sold at $1.15 per
box.
Cig Case to Superior Court.
An information was filed direct In
superior court yesterday by Prose
cuting Attorney Kemp against R. H.
Bethel, one of the cement contract
ors on Wenatchee.avenue. Mr. Bethel
was arrested Monday night by Chief
Inscho for smoking "coffin nails,"
and he hag employed Ira Thomas to
defend him in this action and the
constitutionality of the law is to be
tested.
Irrigation Ditch at Trinidad.
Trinidad, Wash., Oct. 6.—Men in
the employ of F. M. Rothrock Land
& Live Stocy company are building an
independent irrigating ditch in the
hills west of the Columbia river. Two
ditches are being constructed to con
vey the water from Tkyson creek to
where it can be used to water 40
acres to be seeded to alfalfa.
City Ambulance Killed Stranger.
Vancouver, Oct. 6.—While out for
a trial spin today Vancouver's new
city police ambulance ran over and
almost instantly killed C. F. Keiss, a
wealthy citizen of Austin, Texas. The
automobile had not been accepted by
the city.
Jack Carter, of Bridgeport, is
spending today in the city.
THE WENATCHEE DAILY WORLD, WENATCHEE, WASHINGTON. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6,1909.
NEW JUDGES EOR
APPLE SHOW
JUDGE VAN DEM AN WILL BE AS
SISTED BY TWO EASTERN AP
PLE EXPERTS—ONE MAN SE
LECTED FROM OREGON.
George J. Kellogg, of Lake Mills.
Wis.; H. M. Dunlap, of Savoy. 111.,
and A. P. Bateham, of Mosier, Ore.,
have been secured as associate judges
of the National Apple Show, to serve
with Chief Judge H. E. Van Deman.
Judge Van Deman is recognized as
the foremost expert on fruit in the
world, and in selecting his associates
he has taken care to secure men who
are thoroughly conversant with the
merits of both eastern and western
apples, and who also recognize the
changing conditions in the northwest
which have given perfection to many
varieties not formerly understood. All
the judges are aware of the value of
pack, which is one of the strongest
features of western fruit.
Mr. Kellogg is 83 years old and
has been an exhibitor of fruit since
1854. He-is the senior member of
the firm of George J. Kellogg & Sons,
proprietors of the Bell Cottage nur
series at Janesville, Wis. He was
one of the judges at the Chicago
World's fair, at the Pan-American
exposition, at the St. Louis fair and
for many years has been the head
judge at the Wisconsin state fairs,
also at a number of county and dis
trict fairs.
Dunlap Well Known.
Mr. Dunlap will be remembered
and welcomed as one of the judges
at the first National Apple Show, and
Is so well known to all exhibitors
that no introduction will be neces
sary. He is a grower, packer, and
shipper of apples, and Is proprietor
of the Rural Home Fruit farm and
president of the Illinois Orchard com
pany. He will be accompanied to
Spokane by his wife.
Mr. Bateham is the only judge se
lected who resides west of the Mis
sissippi. He is one of the most prom-,
inpnt frnff experts in the northwest
and has officiated at many exposi
tions aid fruit shows. He is a Ftrong
advocate of the commercial points in
apple cultpre and the fact of bis se
lection as judge has been received
with much commendation.
ROAD BUILT
MASSED
CARS TO RUN ON THE DOUGLAS
COUNTY BRANCH OF G. N.
NEXT WEEK—NEW TOWN HAS
FINE PROSPECTS.
j Mansfield, Wash.. Oct. 6.— The
i track layers on the Douglas county
' branch of the Great Northern road
j have completed all their work to this
j place, with the exception of the V
and switch yards. They will be all
j through in a few days and then move
!to Okanogan county to work on the
Brewster-Orovllle extension of Jim
j Hill's line up the Columbia. This
branch line is 62 miles long and in-
I tersects the main line at Columbia
I Siding, east of Wenatchee. A large
force of men and teams has been at
work several months under direction
of Porter Bros. & Welch. A round
house will be built at this point as
well as two miles of side track. Regu
lar train service will commence Octo
ber 10.
The farmers' union warehouse
platform has been completed and sev
eral cars of wheat already adorn the
site awaiting cars for shipment to
Sound markets.
Build New Warehouses.
The Seattle Grain company will
start work on its warehouse here
! next and four other grain buy-
I ing will put up houses here as
| soon as the train service brings in
j the necessary lumber and building
material. As the terminus of the
I new road Mansfield promises to be a
j live, progressive town, with good
openings for various lines of busi
ness.
Already two banks have been es
tablished here, a newspaper will be
Installed in a short while, and so far
there are two restaurants, one hotel,
one pool room and lodging house, one
blacksmith shop, two general mer
chandise stores, one harness shop,
two real estate offices, one doctor,
and other lines.
The suit of A. H. Smith vs. the
Olympia Brewing Co. and J. H. Mil
ler was concluded last night, after
being on trial four days. Judge Grim
shaw has taken the matter under ad
visement and will probably render a
decision within the coming few days.
Miss Stella Taylor left for the fair
today on No. 1.
Member of the Associated Press
Smith Trial Concluded.
10 REVISE APPLE
RATING CARO
PLAN INAUGURATED BY MAN
AGEMENT OF NATIONAL AP
PLE SHOW FOR GATHERING OF
APPLE GROWERS IN SPOKANE
Plans are being made for a meet
ing of representatives from fruit
growing districts in the United States
and Canada during the second Na
tional Apple show in Spokane, No
vember 15 to 20, to arrange a score
card which will include all the stand
ard varieties of commercial winter
apples ,and give them their proper
rating.
Regarding this convention the Ap
ple Show Bulletin will say in its
forthcoming issue that it is conceded
on all sides that no score card has
yet heen published which is fair at
the present time, for the reason that
during the last few years several va
rities of apples have been brought to
a state of perfection which entitled
them to a new rating. Continuing it
cays:
"Scoring values were suggested
last year which gave each variety a
full rating on quality. This plan,
while commended by many exhibit
ors was criticized by others, who in
sisted that proper recognition was
not given to some high grade com
mercial apples. This year the trus
tees of the National Apple Show in
vited all exhibitors to give their
views upon improvements for the
second show, and a majority of the
exhibitors requested that the rules
and scoring card of the American
Pomologies] society be adopted.
"This was done, but it is now ap
parent that the quality ratings are
not fair to several varieties, prin
cipally because such apples as the
Winesap. Jonathan. Rome Beauty
and others which are groVn exten
sively in the northwest areVtill un
der the ratings announced 12 years
ago bj the American Pomological
society, when these varieties were
not brought to the present state of
perfection.
"There is no question but what
the American Pomological society
should make a complete revision of
its score card, but unfortunately
that organization will not meet
again until 1911. In the meantime
the National Apple Show finds it a
most difficult problem to use a score
card which will be fair to all dis
tricts.
"It Is conceded that the rules of
the American Pomological society
are uniformly fair, but the quality
ratings are not just. The rules
specify that in making awards the
judges shall first consider the value
of the varieties for the purpose for
which they may be adapted: second,
color, size and uniformity of fruit;
third, freedom from insects and
other blemishes; fourth, pack.
"These rules meet universal ap
proval, and it is regretted that a
score card has never been announced
which would be fair to all apples and
yet conform to the foregoing rules."
OPEN BOX BALE
ALLEY
LEVASSEUR, GALLAGHER A
STEWART WILL OPEN FOR
BUSINESS POPULAR AMUSE
MENT IN CRASS BUILDING.
Messrs. Levasseur, Gallagher &
Stewart, western representatives of
the American Box Ball company, will
open a place of amusement in this
city tomorrow night. These men are
conducting box ball alleys in a large
number of places on the coast and
it has proven a very popular amuse
ment. The old Tumwater building
has been tastily remodeled and the
alleys have been installed and will be
in readiness for the opening tomor
row. These men promise courteous
treatment and every effort will be
made to make box ball as popular
in this city as it has proven in other
cities.
Wenatchee Men at Hunters.
Hunters, Wash., Oct. 6. —Herbert
Davis on Saturday sold 57 acres of
river front, of which 10 acres is in
orchard, to Ben Sykes of Spokane,
for $3,500.
This tract, with the property owned
by J. J. Browne of Spokane consist
ing of about 200 acres, will be set to
orchard and later platted Into a town
site.
Guy Browne, son of J. J. Browne
of Spokane, was in Hunters last week
with a surveyor running water levels
and making estimates of the cost of
getting water upon the J. J. Browne
and the Ben Sykes properties.
Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Howard, of Chi
cago, are here visiting friends.
Wenatchee's Big Red Apple Daily
MUCH MONEY FOR
IMPROVEMENTS
STREET AND SEWER CONTRACT
ORS ESTIMATE FOR WORK
DONE IN SEPTEMBER AGGRE
GATES VERT LARGE SUM.
That the city of Wenatchee is do
ing a great deal of municipal work is
evidenced from the estimates of the
contractors for work done during
September as submitted last night to
the city council. The city withholds
10 per cent of the estimate and the
following are the amounts due:
Sewer $ 712,80
Okanogan avenue 144.00
Palouse street 966.73
Kittitas and Third excava
tion 1.084.05
Kittitas and Third, con
crete i 572.17
Wenatchee aye., norm end 5,981.12
Wenatchee aye., south end 4.297.30
Wenatchee aye.. concrete. 10,077.99
Of the Wenatchee avenue estimate
10 per cent, or $2,035.64 is withheld
and $5,197.20 was paid on a previous
estimate, leaving $13,123.58 to be
paid today.
Wenatchee water works. $3,953.39.
SHOULD EXHIBIT
TEN CARS
MIKE HORAN STATES THERE
WILL BE NO DIFFICULTY IN
SECURING APPLES FOR THE
NATIONAL APPLE SHOW.
The people of this valley are just
beginning to wake up to the neces
sity of making an exhibit at the Na
tional Apple Show and this morning
the Daily World heard expressions
from dozens of business men and
fruit growers who expressed them
selves that the valley would make a
great mistake if Wenatchee was not
represented at the Spokane show.
There was a great deal of indig
nation expressed here at the report
published in the Spokesman-Review
yesterday under a Yakima date line
that Wenatchee buyers were in Par
ker Bottom after apples with which
to exhibit at Spokane. The report is
to ridiculous to deny and shows to
what extremes Yakima is carrying her
jealousy of this valley.
Mike Horan. who exhibited so suc
cessfully last year is one of the most
insistent boosters for the show this
year. He is urging a district exhibit
and says that he has no doubt what
ever that fully 10 carloads can be
taken to the show this year and he
believes that notwithstanding the un
fair rules adopted that Wenatchee
can carry off the first prizes. He is
going to exhibit personally if a dis
trict organization is not effected and
will take fully a carload or apples to
the fair. Mr. Horan's idea is to form
a district organization including the
Wenatchee valley. Monitor, Cash
mere. Peshaßtin, Leavenworth. Enti
at, Chelan and Malaga, and he says
that there will be no difficulty at all
in securing fully 10 carloads of ex
hlbitable apples. His plan is to form
an organization at the Commercial
club meeting Monday night, appoint
committees to have this matter in
charge and then canvass the valley
for apples, such to be passed on by
a competent committee 1n order to
secure only the best of apples and
varieties. Mr. Horan states that Mr.
France will take a carload of Arkan
sas Black to Spokane, providing he is
given assistance to the value of $200.
Already there have been voluntary
cash pledges to assist the growers in
making the exhibit. Among those
who have promised to assist are W.
T. Clark, $300: H. J. Shinn, $50; M.
Horan, $25; Alex Murray. $10; We
natchee Department store, $25. and
Mr. Horan states that he has no hesi
tancy in saying that every business
man in the city would give to this
fund when solicited.
The prospects are that there will
be a very enthusiastic meeting at the
Commercial club Monday night, when
formal action will be taken on this
matter of exhibiting. The residents
of the valley appreciate the benefi
cial results of the National Apple
Show of last year and are willing to
strain a point in order to make the
exhibit this year.
Moving Fire Station.
The city fire station building i 6 be
ing moved south from its present
location in order to allow of the erec
tion of the Commrecial club building
on the lot adjoining. The building
Is being moved but a few feet.
Marriage Licenses.
Marriage licenses were issued yes
terday to W. 0. E. Kafka and Miss
Dorothy Case, both of Entiat, and
Nelson Forsythe and Miss Lillian Mc-
Evoy, both of Merritt, Wash. »
5c PER COPY.
PUMP IS WORKING
FINE
ENGINEER SAYS NEW CHIT WA
TER SYSTEM IS IX FINE SHAPE
—HOTH PUMP AND RESERVOIR
ARE SATISFACTORY.
City Consulting Engineer Hanford,
of Seattle, was present at the meet
ing of the city council last night and
reported on the city pump and also
on the city reservoir. Mr. Hanford
spent all day yesterday at the pump
house and at the reservoir and care
fully noted the details of these new
improvements. Mr. Hanford stated
to the council that the pump was in
good running order but recommended
that a good mechanic be secured in
one of the city shops in Seattle to
report on the alignment of the pump.
Mr. Hanford, on behalf of the city,
protested against the acceptance of
the pump-house itself from the con
tractors, stating that some of the
work was defective and was not what
the city paid for.
The ordinances providing for a
sewer in block 13, for the use of
signs, awnings and banners and for
the repair of sidewalks was given a
second reading.
W. H. Lavassioner applied for a
license to conduct a box ball alley
in the building formerly occupied by
•he Turn water saloon. There was
some little misunderstanding by the
council as to the interpretation of
the new ordinance providing for li
censing bowling alleys. The strict
reading of the ordinance imposes a
license of $50 per annum for each
alley but the council last night voted
to interpret the ordinance as mean
ing that each bowling alley business
should pay a tax of $50. The peti
tion of Mr. Lavassioner was referred
to the license committee.
The license committee also asked
further time to investigate the appli
cation of J. M. Duffy for a pool room
in the Olympia building.
The water committee reported on
the petition of F. F. Keller for re
bate on his water charge for the
months of July and August. The
committee recommended that no re
bate be given.
There was considerable discussion
among the member of the council-as
to the disposition of the refuse of the
city. It was suggested that the com
mittee be instructed to look up the
matter of the cost of a crematory and
also look up a. site for a dumping
ground for refuse.
The city scavenger's troubles were
aired at the meeting last night. He
has been burying the cattle and
horses which had died in the city on
the flat south of town. The owners
of the property have stopped him
from that and now he has to haul
the dead into Canyon No. 2, west of
the city. This is a long haul and he
asks that the council back him up
in his claim for $7 for each funeral.
The old charge has been but $5
where he has had to go only a short
distance south of the city, but he
thinks with the long haul that be
should be paid the $7. The council
concurred.
Petitions are being circulated in
the district of which Washington ave
nue. B. C. D and E streets are a part
for the Improvement of that section
of the city. This includes not only
the north and south streets but the
east and west cross streets as well.
The street committee will take up the
matter this week with the property
owners who are promoting this im
provement and it is likely that a peti
tion will be prepared to be submitted
at the coming council meeting to in
clude the improvement of all this dis
trict. The plan is for bonding the
district, the bonds to run a period
of five years. The street committee
was also instructed to hurry up the
plans for the sewer district, which is
to cover this section of the town, and
it Is the idea to have the sewer work
done before a start is made on the
street improvements.
WRECK ON COLUM
BIA RIVER
Vancouver, Wash., Oct. 6.—The
eastbound passenger train No. 4. of
the Spokane, Portland & Seattle rail
way, which left this city shortly after
6 last night, was wrecked by a land
slide at 11 o'clock, between Fountain
and Sandal, 125 miles east. Engineer
C. A. Bigsby was killed. Fireman B.
F. Bear was seriously injured; Ex
press Messenger A. Kopler. severe
scalp wounds, and Mail Clerk H. C.
Pettitt severely bruised about the
head. The engine, baggage car and
tourist car left the rails. The engine
was overturned. No passengers were
hurt. The road will be cleared this
afternoon.
Mrs. Will Little went to eLaven
worth today to visit her mother. Mrs.
O. S. Sampson.

xml | txt