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The Wenatchee daily world. [volume] (Wenatchee, Wash.) 1905-1971, November 29, 1909, Image 1

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tehee's Big Red Apple Daily Member of the Associated Press Wenatchee's Big Red Apple
Wenatchee's Big Red Apple Daily
VOL. V. NO. 116.
WHO'SWHOAMONG
REPUBLICANS
FIRST QUESTION TO BE SETTLED
NEXT MONDAY WHEN CON
GRESS MEETS — REACTION
ARIES VS. PROGRESSIVES.
Washington. Nov. 29. —The thrill
ing drama of "Who's Who in the Re
publican Party?" is slated for the
boards next Monday when congress
assembles. The challenge has been
issued by the insurgents and has
been accepted by Speaker Cannon.
Uncle Joe's speech last night in Kan
sas City clearly indicated a rule or
ruin policy on the part of the house
organization. Just what effect the
forthcoming struggle will have on the
legislative program this winter is
problematical.
Senator Cummins, one of the fore
most insurgents, is inclined to the
belief that a number of the measures
desired by President Taft will go
through—but only because the regu
lars believe that they see a chance
in this way to interpose the presi
dent between them and their con
stituents. There are other insur
gents who hold to the view that the
scrap means the end of all hope of
constructive legislation this session
Both sides would like to know pre
cisely the attitude of President Taft.
Endorsement by him of either of the
belligerents might turn the tide. But
the president is non-communicative.
Just at present he does not intend to
be drawn into what probably will de
velop into a party conflict of great
magnitude. He will likely wait until
the actual warfare begins and oppor
tunity is given to size up the situa
tion.
The speaker's Kansas City speech,
in the opinion of those here who
ought to know, is admittedly an ex
position of the platform upon which
the regulars will stand. But what
gives the insurgents most hope is
that there are very few republicans
—except those irrevocably committed
to "the machine"—who appear to
possess the courage to subscribe en
tirely to that policy. Speaker Can
non's denunciation was so severe and
sensational, they declare that it may
react and result in crystalizing into
a demand for the speaker's decapita
tion and the overthrow of the "ma
chine" on the ground that he and
his program constitute a menace
which may defeat the party in the
elections next November.
In other words, the insurgents are
praying that Cannon has overstepped
the mark.
The insurgents' fight is for a new
majority of the majority. The regu
lars are arrayed against what they
term an attempt of the minority of
the majority to rule.
New York. Nov. 29.—What is gen
erally believed will be one of the
most exciting sessions of congress
held in many years will hold its first
meeting just a week from Monday.
It is expected that there will be
trouble from the dropping of the hat.
or. to be exact, from the first call
of the speaker's gavel. The insur
gent republicans have their war paint
on and recent speeches leaves- no
doubt that Speaker Cannon has made
strong war medicine.
Ghost dancing on the part of the
insurrectors has been in progress for
weeks, led by three big braves of the
senate. La Follette, Cummins and
Bristow. The first break from the
house reservation will come in the
shape of a motion to amend the
rules curtailing the power of the
speaker and this, it is expected, will
oome as soon as tho president's mes
sage is read.
Every important committee of the
house has a calendar full of bills,
introduced in the extra session, and
a flood of new measures, cooked up
by ambitious members during the
recess, is expected at the outset.
Here are some of the things con
gress will find ready on hand to work
on:
Granting increased powers to the
interstate commerce commission,
with authority to regulate the issue
of railroad securities; to initiate com
plaints of discrimination in rates; to
compel connecting carriers to form
through routes and apportion rates
among carriers; to determine the
proper classification of freight.
An amendment to the Sherman
anti-trust act exempting labor unions
from penalties for combination.
Authorization to railroads to pool
under strict supervision of the inter
state commerce commission.
Continued on Page 4.
CARLOADS OF COAL
WHITEWASHED
GREAT NORTHERN ADOPTS UN
IQUE METHOD OF PROTECTING
FREIGHT FROM DEPREDA
TIONS EN ROUTE.
Carloads of whitewashed coal are
quite common these days on the
Great Northern railway. The white
washing is not done to improve the
appearance or to increase the burn
ing qualities. The treatment neither
improves nor harms the fuel.
It is a detective scheme on the
part of the railroads to locate and
to prevent the theft of the coal as
it is hauled from the mines to the
consumer. j
These depredations amount to
thousands of tons annually, and the
railroads are the sufferers, as it is
up to them to deliver as many tons
at their destination, often 1,000 miles
away, as were weighed in when the
car was turned over for transporta
tion. Two or three tons may be re
moved from a carload containing 40
tons without attracting attention to
its decreased quantity until the car
is again placed on the scales. To
locate the loss, limewater is sprayed
over a carload of coal. In a short
time the water has evaporated, leav
ing a load of white coal. Then re
moval of any coal leaves a big black
spot, which is quickly noted by in
spectors and station agents, and the
leak found and stopped.
WANT LABOR LEG
ISLATION
SAMUEL GOMPERB AND OTHER
LEADERS CALLED UPON PRES
IDENT TAFT TODAY TO I ROE
RE( OMM ENDATIONS.
Washington, Nov. 29.— Recom
mendations looking toward the im
piovement of the conditions of the
laboring men which it is desired that
the president should incorporate in
his annual message to congress were
urged upon the president by Gom
pers and other labor leaders today.
The foremost issue is concerning the
issuance of injunctions by federal
judges particularly as they apply to
personal liberty and their use in set
tlement of disputes between employ
ers and employes. The exemption of
labor organizations from certain pro
visions of the Sherman anti-trust act
was also discussed.
The president has practically de
cided that his message to congress
will make no detailed recommenda
tions regarding the Sherman act.
Death of Infant.
George Samuel Holcomb. the lit
tle son of Mr. and Mrs. S. R. Hol
comb, died at their home on North
E street at 12:45 this afternoon, of
pneumonia. He was seven months
and two days old. The funeral ser
vice will be at the home at 1:30 to
morrow. Rev. Utter will conduct the
funeral service. Sprague & Ruppe
have charge of the body.
Stag Social Tonight.
The K. of P. lodge members have
made extensive arrangements for the
stag social which is- to be given to
night in the lodge room. A cordial
invitation is extended to all mem
bers, whether they affiliate with the
local lodge or any other lodge. The
program commences at 8 o'clock.
Sussex a Consulting Engineer.
J. W. Sussex, of this city, has been
made local consulting engineer for
the Fairbanks. Morse & Co.. of Se
attle.
Bryan to Tour Latin America.
El Paso, Texas, Nov. 29.—Bryan
is preparing to tour South and Cen
tral America and will visit the Pana
ma canal.
Still It Rains.
Washington—Rain tonight and
Tuesday, with high winds on the
coast.
Out After Ducks.
A. H. Witte, W. S. Becker, John
Ham and Herman Ham will leave to
night for a few days' duck hnnt at
Moses lake.
THE WENATCHEE DAILY WORLD, WENATCHEE, WASHINGTON, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1909.
PRISON FOR HIGH
OFFICIALS
PRESIDENT TAFT EXPRESSES
OPINION THAT SUGAR TRUST
OFFICIALS WILL BE CON
VICTED.
Washington, Nov. 29.
Taft told Representative Weeks of
Massachusetts today that he firmly
believed that some of the high of
ficials in the sugar trust would event
ually be landed in the penitentiary
because of the frauds which have
been unearthed at the New York cus
toms house.
He declared that Attorney General
Wickersham was determined to press
his investigations. The president fur
ther said that the attorney general
was convinced that he was on the
right track and that before very long
he would be able to bring the men
"higher up" to book.
In the course of his conversation
with Mr. Taft. Representative Weeks,
who is himself a member of a large
firm of bankers and brokers, brought
up the subject of the frauds commit
ted by the sugar trust which have
been exposed by Collector Loeb of
New York.
"If this thing had not been prov
ed," said Weeks to the president. "I
would have never believed that big
business concerns in this country
would have attempted to commit
such petty crimes. The petty meth
ods of false weighing and bribery
' ought to be probed to the very bot
[ torn. I hope the government will
i not rest until it has instituted crim
-1 inal prosecution against some of the
high officials who are really respon*
; sible. instead of being satisfied with
■ landing merely the small fry."
It was at this point that Mr. Taft
assured the congressman that the at
torney general was convinced that
he would be able, from the evidence
he has in hand and to which addi
tions are being made daily, to indict
some of the big men of the trust.
Representative Weeks is convinced
that there will be a congressional in
vestigation of the whole subject this
winter. He said:
"Some one is sure to introduce
such a resolution and there is no one
who would dare vote against it."
"RELIGIOUS ELE
MENT IN MAN"
REV. W. A. WATERMAN, NEW
CONGREGATIONAL MINISTER,
GAVE INTERESTING SERMON
AT ELK'S HALL.
At Elks Hall yesterday afternoon
the Congregationalists held a very
impressive service. Their minister,
the Rev. W. A. Waterman, recently
from Chicago, gave the address upon
"The Religious Element in Man." He I
called attention to the triune nature
Of man. Asserting that the physical, j
mental and spiritual parts each had'
its own peculiar construction, laws
and destiny. The observance and
culture of each of these distinct parts j
by the keeping of the laws thereof
brings man to his highest possible es
tate for this and future life. This is;
the comprehensive status of religion.
Religion then is the normal condition
of man. No religion is an abnormal
condition. The development and cul
ture of the spiritual parts are as es- j
sential to the perfect and complete j
man as are the development and cul-i
ture of the physical and mental. The!
Bible is the hand book of the Creator.
God, to aid man in this development.
The destruction of the Bible, creeds
and church would not affect man's ob
ligation to a religious life. To love,
deal justly and serve God and hu
manity would remain as now and
ever have been if these were de
stroyed. Should every law book in
Washington be burned, it would still
be wrong to lie, steal and murder.
The Bible, creed and church are di
vinely given to aid man in loving the
true and beautiful, dealing justly,
and serving his Creator and fellows.
The obligations of laws of being when
observed constitute the religious life
and normal state of human being and
character.
H. L • Packard returned Saturday
from Ephrata, where he has visited a
few days.
Member of the Associated Press
BUTTLES BOUGHT
PALMETTO
FORMER COUNTY TREASURER
HAS SUCCEEDED B. T. DUNCAN
AS OW NER OF CONFECTIONERY
STORF—MOVE TO BANK BLDG.
C. E. Buttles, former county treas
urer, this morning succeeded B. T.
Duncan as owner of the Palmetto con
fectionery store. The new owner took
possession today. Mr. Buttles has
secured a lease of one of the new
store rooms in the First National
Bank building and this will be ready
for occupancy in about ten days. His
lease is for the room the second from
the alley, which was formerly occu
pied by Mr. Duncan. The new owner
is an old time resident of this valley
and for four years served as county
treasurer. Last summer he and his
wife left for the Sound, thinking to
make a home there, but they have re
turned to Wenatchee, believing that
there is no place on the coast equal
to this city.
EAST BOUND PAS
SENGERS LATE
SLIDE WEST OF TUNNEL HELD
I P XOS. 2, 26. 44 AXD FAST
MAIL — ALL ARRIVED THIS
AFTERNOON.
Xos. 2, 26. 44 and the fast mail j
all arrived in a bunch shortly after j
! noon today. High water around ,
'Everett and Snohomish fend a slide j
! just west of the tunnel last night j
' caused the delay. The k continued
' rain on the Sound is causing unusu
| ally high water for this time of the
year and all roads are having a great
deal of difficulty in getting through.
The soft weather has also induced
slides in the mountains and extra
crews are maintained on the Cascades
to keep the road free.
Won the $8 Prize.
Miss Maude Willis was the sue-
I
cessful winner of the $5 prize at the
' Schade & Parshall company's store
> Saturday in the guessing clock con
j'test. The clock stopped at 9 o'clock
|58 seconds. Mrs. Willis' guess was
'9:20 and 4 seconds. She received a
$5 prize as the closest contestant.
Kenney-Garrett.
Miss Edith Lorena Kenney and Mr.
Herbert L. Garrett, of the Stemilt
valley, were quietly married yester
day noon at the Methodist parsonage.
Rev. H. L. Beightol officiating. Mr.
and Mrs. Garrett will make their fu
ture home in the Stemilt valley.
OR. MATTHEWS
TONIGHT
All who have lived in the west for
the past ten years have come to re
cognize in the Rev. Dr. Matthews of
Seattle a leader in all that makes for
the best things in civic improvement
—higher morality and good govern
ment. The messages that he gives
from time to time on his lecturing
tours are such as to be of a decided
benefit to the community in which
they are delivered. But if the doctor
is anything he is interesting. His
new and. as some consider them, sen
sational methods of presentation of
thought are striking and fascinating
—those who have heard him go again
and again. It is no unfrequent thing
for two to five thousand people to
be turned away from his church in
Seattle. Nor is his fame on the wane.
He never had greater crowds and
more rapt attention than he is hav
ing this winter.
The people of Wenatchee are very
fortunate in having the opportunity
to hear him tonight at the Presby
terian church, at 8:15. Doors will
be opened at 7:30. Admission will
be 75 cents for a single admission.
The tickets for the whole course are
$2 each, and may be had at the Red
Cross and Wenatchee Drug Store, at
Howard Thomas' jewelry store and
the Armstrong book store.
W. P. Dorn, of Cashmere, was in
town Saturday.
THOUGHT TO HAVE
SUICIDED
O. M. BUTLER, FORMER RESI
DENT OF WENATCHEE, IS
THOUGHT TO HAVE JUMPED
INTO RIVER.
News was received in this city this
morning that O. M. Butler, formerly
in the clothing business in this city,
was thought to have suicided. But
ler had been in Seattle for the past
two weeks consulting specialists re
j garding an affection of the heart. He
was told that the doctors could do
i nothing for him and it was only a
question of a short time when his
death would come. The news is
thought to have deranged his mind.
He was accompanied home from Se
attle this morning by a cousin of his
j wife. The man left Butler unguard
ed for a few minutes and he disap
i peared. He was tracked to the river
and fears are entertained that he
jumped into the Wenatchee river,
which at the present time is quite
a torrent. The alarm was given of
| the man's disappearance and large
crowds from Cashmere are scouring
I the country in search of the man.
! The local officers were notified this
j morning to watch the river for the
t body.
O. M. Butler was well known in
this city. He was formerly engaged
in the clothing and shoe business in
the building now occupied by Mil's
Bros. After selling out to the Mills
Bros, he went to Cashmere and pur
chased land. He is said to be pos
sessed of considerable wealth and was
well liked here. He is a large,
healthy looking man and it was not
generally known here that he was
subject to heart trouble. Butler was
married and has a wife and two chil
dren.
Chief of Police Inscho was request
ed this forenoon to assist in the
search for Mr. Butler, and with a
number of volunteers left about noon
to follow up the Wenatchee river in
the hopes of recovering the body. It
was generally conceded by friends of
the man at noon today that he was
a suicide and while demented had
taken his life.
CONVICTED I.W.W.
LEADER
Spokane. Nov. 29. —John Pancner,
one of the leaders of the I. W. W.'s.
was convicted of conspiracy and sen
tenced today to six months in jail at
hard labor. Evidence was introduced
that in fighting the Spokane ordi
nance prohibiting street speaking, he
had sent out telegrams calling for
men to fill the jails in Spokane.
Pancner has appealed.
Demonstrating Machine Arrived.
The Thornhill-Monney company
was in receipt yesterday of a new
auto which will be used for demon
strating purposes. This company
represents the Overland machine and
the new machine is of the Overland
make. Auto enthusiasts of this val
ley predict that the coming season
will see more new machines purchas
ed than are already numbered in the
valley. There are several Overland
machines already here and during the
past season it has been demonstrated
that these made an enviable record
and this company already has inquir
ies from a number of people who are
considering the purchase of one of
this makes.
BOLD BANK AT MANSFIELD
Contractors Begin Work on Structure
at New Town.
Mansfield. Nov. 29. —Mr. Sheridan
of Spokane, with the contract for the
brick work, and Mr. Sullivan of Rear
dan, for the carpenter work, arrived
in Mansfield to begin work on the
Mansfield State Bank building. Mr.
Tucker of Coulee City is president
and A. Kirkpatrick, formerly with
the Spokane & Eastern Trust com
pany, cashier. Mansfield will handle
1.000,000 bushels of grain next year.
Lota of Booze at Home, says the Echo
Every time an intoxicated man is
arrested in Wenatchee it is laid to
Leavenworth booze, which is no
doubt the case sometimes, but not al
ways. If the police of that virtuous
little city would make a thorough
search they would probably find
planty of booze at home, without com
ing to Leavenworth.
Wenatchee's Big Red Apple Daily
DOUGLAS STREET
ASSESSMENT
THE ASSESSMENT ROLL IS NOW
IN THE HANDS OF THE CITY
TREASURER FOR DOUGLAS
STREET IMPROVEMENT.
The assessment roll for the im
provement of Douglas street is now
with the city treasurer and the im
provement charges must be paid
prior to December 26 or a penalty
will attach. Between Third and
Fourth street, where cement side
walks have been laid, the charge is
$51.13 for each 25 foot lot. The
assessment between Third and Che
lan avenue for each 25 feet is $34.40.
This assessment is payable at the
city treasurer's office and if not paid
before December 26 a penalty of 10
per cent will attach, and 15 per cent
interest will be charged. This is the
first improvement district assessment
roll in Wenatchee to be approved.
Partner of Shopper Arrested.
M. E. Curts, who is associated with
Miss Needles, was arrested yesterday
in Wenatchee on the same charge as
that made against the woman with
the swell hat. Cifrts is now in the
county jail and the sheriff from one
of the counties on the coast will be
here tomorrow to take him back.
Miss Needles was taken out on the
westbound train last night by a dep
uty sheriff from Aberdeen.
STOPS G. N. WATER
SUPPLY
RAILWAY FAILS TO SECURE
RIGHT AND EPHRATA FARM
ERS STEAL MARCH ON ROAD
AND ENCORES GO DRY.
Ephrata. Wash.. Nov. 29.—Be
cause of failure of the Great North
ern to secure a water right on the
spring near Ephrata. where they
have been getting water for 16 years,
K. A. Tolliver and son, of Taylors
ville, TIL. beat them to it, shut off
the water pending the settlement of
a suit and a half dozen big mogul
engines have gone dry on the main
line of the Great Northern as a re
sult, two trains being laid up here
for lack of water. Ephrata is the
only station between Wilson Creek
and Trinidad where the engines can
secure water.
In the foothills west of town is a
bubbling spring that, years ago. was
piped to the Great Northern tracks
for water for engines. Only a lease
on the pipe line running 80 rods from
the spring to the track was secured
to clinch the right. Jesse Cyrus, on
whose farm the spring is located, re
cently sold the property to Illinois
men. They immediately found they
could use the water to greater ad
vantage for irrigation and city use
and began suit.
Dilatory tactics on the part of rail
way attorneys delayed the proceed
ings, so with a lawyer Mr. Tolliver
went to the spring, shut off the wa
ter and advised company officers to
settle the suit at their convenience.
Besides the cars stalled here, sev
eral other trains have been left near
Quincy.
FURMAN-SPENCER
Mr. Martin P. Spencer and Miss
Grace T. Furman were married
Thursday. November 25. at La
Grande, Oregon. The wedding was
at the home of Rev. and Mrs. F. M.
Canfield. uncle and aunt of the bride.
The wedding announcement, which
reached the Daily World office this
morning, states that they will be at
home at Wenatchee in 1910. The
news of the wedding will be quite a
surprise to the friends of Martin
Spencer of this city. He has always
been looked upon as a confirmed
bachelor. The bride is not known
in this city but she is said to be a
childhood friend of Mr. Spencer. The
good wishes of the host of friends
will go with Mr. and Mrs. Spencer
in their matrimonial venture.
Arrested One Drunk.
Officer Nelson today noon took into
custody one drunk. The man arrived
here on one of the delayed trains
from Leavenworth and he secured his
booze at that place.
run PLANT A
sura
SYSTEM ON PLACE OF CAPT. V.
PERC V SMITH AT EAST WENAT
CHEE IRRIGATES 30 ACRES OF
LAM) AT A COST OF *o AN ACRE
During the past season Capt. V.
Percy Smith, residing at East Weiat
chee, installed a pumping plant which
furnishes water from the Columbia
river to his 30-acre tract on the
Douglas county side.
The plant seemed to be such a suc
cess that at the request of the Daily
World, the owner has furnished the
following description of the plant:
The pumping outfit consists of a
Byron-Jackson two-stage centrifugal
pump set in concrete bases 10 feet
above low water. The advantage of
this pump is that it is submersible,
consequently has not to be moved up
or down the bank to conform to the
rise and fall of the river, as is the
case with cylindrical pumps. This
pump is guaranteed by the makers to
give 300 gallons per minute to a hun
dred-foot lift. In the present case the
lift is 45 feet at high water and 75
feet at low water and the flow has
been from 550 to 400 gallons per min
ute, according to the height of water
in the river. The shaft of the pump
is operated by a 15-h. p. gasoline
engine. The engine shaft gives 200
revolutions per minute and by means
of belts and a countershaft the shaft
of the pump is revolved at 850 revolu
tions per minute, which gives the
above volume. The engine burns a
110-gallon drum of distillate in 2 0
hours and during this time it has de
livered 450,000 gallons of water onto
the ground. It has been proved on
this ranch that this amount of water
during two days will cover 30 acres of
trees to such an extent that for six
weeks afterward the furrows will ap
pear as black stripes six feet wide.
On the basis of four such irriga
tions being sufficient for a season,
it will be seen that four drums of
distillate will do the business and
the cost of these drums are $58, or
less than $2 per acre.
The irrigation of the tract was
placed in the hands of the pumping
firm and this outfit has proved an
entire success. A novel form of
contract was drawn up with this firm.
With the exception of $100 put up as
a guarantee of good faith, not an
other cent was paid until the entire
outfit was installed and had pumped
the water for ten days. Installing
a pumping outfit is a risky opera
tion, but when one can obtain such
terms as these all element of risk
and loss of money is eliminated. It
is the only sure proof of reliability.
The initial cost amounted to about
$65 per acre. My assistance and ex
perience is always at the disposal of
anyone contemplating the installation
of a similar outfit.
Captain Smith, previous to com
ing to Wenatchee. was captain in
the regular army of England and
served in India. Burmah, Africa and
many other places all over the globe.
After Twelve years of army life he
grew tired of this kind of life and at
the suggestion of a New York apple
man he came west. The second day
after purchasing property in Wenat
chee he was offered an advance of
$5000 for his property, but refused.
He is the son of Sidney Smith, the
noted English prelate.
New lumping Plant at Orondo.
Plans are on foot for the installa
tion of a pumping plant to be located
on the Orondo flat at the Entiat rap
ids. This pump will be used to irri
gate lands owned by H. N. Swart
wood. J. B. Smith, S. A. Perkins.
William Johns, D. C. Towne, L. C.
Ross. Rufus Woods and various oth
ers. It is expected that the plant
will be ready for operation by May
1, 1910.
Feared Furtlier Prosecution.
Thelma Stanley, the Columbia ave
nue lodging house keeper, who was
convicted last week of three charges
of reMwg liquor without a hcenre.
has apparently jumped the town. She
was mifted immediately after paying
her fine and it is thought that she
feared both government and stare
prosecution for bootlegging.
i*reparing Message.
Washington, Nov. 29.—Taft has
begun the dictating of his annual
message to congress. He expects to
complete the work and have it in th*
hands of the public printer by the
middle of the week.
5e PER COPY

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