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The Wenatchee daily world. [volume] (Wenatchee, Wash.) 1905-1971, December 17, 1909, Image 1

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Wenatchee's Big Red Apple Daily
VOL. V. NO. 132.
FOB FEDERAL
iHi II
WE
SENATOR JONES HAS INTRO
DCCED BILL PROVIDING FOR
STRUCTURES AT WENATCHEE,
WATERVILLE AND ELLENS
BURG.
V
Washington. D. C, Dec. 17. Sen
ator W. L. Jones'introduced bills to
day for public buildings at Wenat
chee, Waterville and Ellensburg.
Senator Piles introduced bills to
increase the limit cost of the public
building at Bellingham from $120,
--000 to $4 20,000 and at Everett from
$130,000 to $400,000.
Senator Piles introduced a bill for
a light and fog signal on Eliza island.
Bellingham bay; also bill for a
launch for the customs service at
Port Townsend, to cost $10,000.
It has been felt here for some
time that Wenatchee was in need of
better postoffice facilities and dur
ing the summer an effort was
made to secure the co-operation of
Senator Jones in the securing of an
appropriation for the erection of a
postoffice building in this city and
it was to this end that the bill was
introduced by Senator Jones.
Offh-ers of Building Association.
There was a meeting of the mem
bers of the Wenatchee branch of the
Pacific Building & Loan association
for the election of officers at the
county auditor's office Wednesday
evening, December 15. A. J. Linville
was elected president; F. W. Arnold,
vice president; J. Godfrey, secretary
and treasurer: Ira Thomas, attorney;
C. Becker and E. B. Norell. loan
agents.
There will be a charter turned over
to this branch. It will transact a
general building and loan business
in the city of Wenatchee.
This branch is building an 8-room
concrete block house at the present
time in Wenatchee Park addition. It
will also start building a business
block on the site where the Wenat
chee Steam Laundry stands. This
building will be started March 1.
There was a large attendance of
members Wednesday night and they
all took a lively interest in the elec
tion. The meeting was called to or
der by Special State Agent Charles
Phipps.
The Straw Market.
The people of the Big Bend have
begun to realize that the construc
tion of the new railroad has opened
to them a new market, viz.: a place
to sell their straw. Likewise the peo
ple of Wenatchee have begun to real
lee that the opening of this road may
cut down the expense of keeping
stock through the winter to a very
great degree. At the present time
hay is selling at $25 per ton. Straw
Is being laid down in Wenatchee for
$8 per ton. With plenty of straw
and just a little grain stock can be
kept in fairly good condition all win
ter. Wheat hay also will be another
commodity to be shipped in from the
Big Bend. During the past fall D.
C. Towne, of the Eagle Livery, had
many tons of hay baled near Doug
las, Wash., which is now being ship
ped into town.
Apples for Christmas Gifts.
Year after year Wenatchee valley
apples are proving the most fitting
Christmas gifts that could be made.
For the past week or ten days there
has been expressed out of the local
office on an average of between 50
to 60 boxes of apples per day. These
are being sent to all sections of the
United States. The local apple houses
are making a practice of fixing up
special Christmas boxes. These bring
fancy prices but are one of the most
practical gifts that could be made.
Furthermore the choice apples that
are sent out of here for this purpose
are of great advertising value and af
ter each Christmas the letters re
ceived are always in high praise of
the apples.
No Box Social.
The box social planned by the Ath
letic association of the Wenatchee
high school has been called off for
tonight. The reasons are many but
the members of the association say
that they expert to have it shortly
after the first of the year.
COLLIER'S IS WITH
INSURGENTS
POPULAR WEEKLY APPROVES
OF PROGRESSIVE REPUBLICAN
LEAGUE AND COMMENDS THE
MOVEMENT.
I'nder the heading of "We Should
Have These Everywhere.'' the current
issue of Collier's gives a boost to the
insurgent movement in congress and
says:
A Progressive Republican league
was organized at Spokane. Wash..
October 20. Its members consist of
the owners and editors of 30 daily
and weekly papers in the state of
Washington. The president is Rufus
Woods, of the Wenatchee (Wash.)
World. Doubtless Mr. Woods would
be glad to furnish information about
the league to others who may wish
to form similar organizations for the
promotion of insurgent principles."
HELPS OKANOGAN
PROJECT
INDIAN COMMISSIONER WILL AID
PLAN OF ADDING 2600 ACRES
TO OKANOGAN RECLAMATION
PROJECT.
Washington. Dec. 16--Senator
Jones today received assurances from
Indian Commissioner Valentine that
the Indian office would help along
as well as it could the plan of adding
2 600 acres of Colville Indian reser
vation land to the Okanogan recla
mation project. These lands lie across
the river from the main body of
lands included in the original pro
ject. Some of them are claimed by
Indians as allotments. What is de
sired is to have the Indians ex
change these for other lands or con
sent to take smaller claims under the
project, so that their holdings may
conform to the maximum acreage al
lowed when water is upt on the land.
Track Walker Badly Beaten by Thugs
John Richardson, a track walker
for the Great Northern at Scenic,
was brought to Everett yesterday un
conscious from injuries received in a
brutal attack by unknown robbers.
Richardson was slugged and robbed
by three men Tuesday night and
thrown over an embankment. He
was badly beaten about the head and
had not regained consciousness when
brought to Everett yesterday after
noon and taken to the hospital.
Railroad officials believe they have
a clue to the thugs and hope to ap
prehend them.
Horse Case Dismissed.
The case of Heath vs. Watts was
dismissed in the superior court yes
terday by Judge Grimshaw on the
motion of the plaintiff's attorney.
This was the case which was tried
before Judge Palmer, wherein Heath
sued Watts for $60, the deferred pay
ment on a horse. Watts set up a
claim that the horse was defective
and the jury in the lower court
brought a verdict of $1 and costs in
favor of Watts. The plaintiff appeal
ed the case but on yesterday asked
for a dismissal, which was granted.
YOUNG RECEIVED
COMPLIMENT
CONTRACTOR ON COMMERCIAL
CLUB AND WORLD BUILDINGS
RECEIVED PRAISE FOR WORK
DONE AT A.-V.-P.
C. S. Young, contractor on the
commercial club building and the
World building, is in receipt of a let
ter from the commissioner of build
ings of the A.-V.-P. which acknowl
edges the kind of work done on the
buildings and states that of all the
building put up on the grounds the
past season that that done by Mr.
Young has proven to be the most
satisfactory of any. Mr. Young had
the contract for a number of the
large buildings at the fair.
WENATCHEE. WASHINGTON, FRIDAY. DECEMBER 17. 1909.
DRUGGISTS TO TEST
VALIDITY
TAX (COMMISSIONER PARISH
POSTPONES ACTION UNTIL
COURTS DETERMINE QUESTION
OF PHARMACISTS.
Druggists will test the validity of
the state law which compels all
persons selling liquors to pay an an
nual tax of $25 to the state for the
privilege. With the understanding
that immediate action will be taken.
State Tax Commissioner T. A. Par
ish, who has been designated by the
tax commissioners to collect this
money, will defer radical proceedings
against pharmacists. It is believed
by the state tax commission that a
test case can be settled within thirty
days and as the druggists might be
right the state board will not be ar
bitrary.
Commissioner Parish has provided
officials of the Royal Arch with a list
of the saloon men who have ignored
the state tax and the saloon men's
organization will insist that all mem
bers pay up any delinquent taxes and
in the future remit their state tax
promptly.
It is believed by the state tax com
mission that the Royal Arch can com
pel payment of the liquor tax prompt
ly and save the state endless litiga
tion and much expense. Since the of
ficers of the organization have prom
ised to see that the saloon men are
not delinquent again an opportunity
will be given them to handle the
case.
Since the tax commission sent out
a peremptory notice that delinquent
licenses must be paid immediately, it
ib announced $25,000 has been re
ceived. This amount will be increas
ed by natural returns from the com
missioner's warning, but the outcome
of the negotiations with the drug
gists and the Royal Arch is expected
to yield far more revenue than the
commissioner's epistolary efforts.
Tn sending out notices to delin
quents the tax commission has run
into a number of peculiar complica
tions. Apparently letters were sent
out indiscriminately to those who pay
government licenses and some of
them were addressed to men engaged
in other lines of business who hap
pened to pay federal licenses for
handling other goods, under the pure
food act. A number of indignant re
plies have been received by the com
mission from men who do not handle
liquors in any manner and the com
mission has been obliged to explain
its position.
SPOKANE MEN IN
METHOW
FOUR MEN PURCHASED 546
ACRES FOR 40,000 — TRACT
WILL BE PLANTED TO FRUTT
IN SPRING.
Spokane. Dec. 17. —Four promi
nent Spokane men have acquired
more than 500 acres of rich land in
the Methow valley. F. E. Pope. C.
H. Weeks. E. C. Fleming and O. S.
Bowen are all well known in Spo
kane.
Through F. E. Pope these pros
pective fruit growers have just closed
a deal for 546 acres on the Methow
river, costing about $40,000. F. E.
Pope has secured the Tea Garden
ranch of 130 acres and the William
Van ranch of 168 acres; E. C. Flem
ing, agent for the Great Northern,
and O. S. Bowen, resident engineer
of the Great Northern, have pur
chased the Sullivan ranch of 95
acres; C. H. Weeks has bought the
Countryman ranch of 153 acres.
The ranches will be combined and
worked cooperatively. A ditch three
and a half miles in length, costing
$5,000, will be built to irrigate the
tract. The Tea Garden ranch is part
ly under water now, and is set out
with some trees. All of the ground
will be put in fruit this coming sea
son, and work on the ditch will be
started early in the spring.
The land Is on the line of the new
Great Northern survey, and may soon
be reached by a railroad. All of the
owners plan to live on the farms
during the summer. The tract ad
joins the forest reserve and there is
an abundance of game in the vicinity.
Member of the Associated Press
STRIKERS GET LAST
CALL
GREAT NORTHERN URGES FOR
MER EMPLOYES TO RETURN
TO WORK—MAY BE BLACK
LISTED.
Spokane, Dec. 17. Last calls to
return to work were issued to the
striking switchmen by the Great
Northern railway, the yardmaster at
Hillyard posting bulletins on the
doors of the shops and yard offices
yesterday. Failure to respond is be
| lieved by the strikers to mean that
| they will be "blacklisted."
• Humors of a conference and final
srttlenient were rife yesterday after
| noon. A meeting of the railroad
| managers' association and the strike
I leaders was scheduled to take place
in St. Paul yesterday or tomorrow.
!It is believed an agreement will be
effected with a compromise raise, the
railroads offering 3 cents the hour
more instead of 6 cents, as demand
ed. Desertion from the strikers'
ranks in northwest cities of B. of R.
T. and O. R. C men is believed to
have forced the strikers to accept the
; offer for a settlement.
Striking switchmen at the local
headquarters declare today that a
Mifficient fund has been accumulated
to prolong the strike for 30 days.
j When the strike fund is exhausted,
the financial aid which has been
promised by the A. F. of L. will serve
as another source of strength for the
strikers.
Local switchmen severely criticize
i the members of the B. of R. T. who
have gone back to work on the Great
Northern here. They say the report
! that the B. of R. T. men of Butte
; hare gone back to work today is
1 false, and they also deny that the B
of R. T. men of Duluth have return
ed to the yards.
"We have reports that the Christ
mas freight at the Twin Cities is com
pletely tied up as a result of the
] strike," said a member of the press
| committee of the local union today.
AEIER TEACHER'S
SCALP
PATEROS SCHOOL PATRONS
WOULD HAVE CERTIFICATE
REVOKED—HEARING REFORE
STATE SUPERINTENDENT.
A hearing is on this afternoon at
the court house in this city. State
Superintendent Dewey being the
jndge as to whether the certificate
of one J. W. Plessinger. a teacher of
Pateros, shall be revoked. Plessin
ger is charged with being a little too
familiar with some of the girls in
his school and in the hearing before
the school board some time ago It
was decided to request the revoca
tion of his certificate. The action
was sustained by the county superin
tendent and the affidavits are now in
the hands of the state superinten
dent awaiting his decision. It is
probable that the case will be set
tled this afternoon. C. T. Borg. of
Pateros, is here to represent the pa
trons of the school and Plessinger is
here in his own behalf.
HORTICULTURISTS
ME TOMORROW
ANNUAL MEETING TO RE HELD
AT CASHMERE FOR THE ELEC
TION OF OFFICERS AND TRANS
ACTION OF BUSINESS.
A large number of the local grow
ers are planning on attending the an
nual session of the Chelan County
Horticultural association which meets
at Cashmere tomorrow. This is the
date for the election of officers and
transaction of other business matters
pertinent to the fruit growing Indus
try. At this time there will be a gen
eral discussion of the Lafean box
measure and plans will also be made
for the entertainment of the state
horticultural association which meets
her the middle of next month.
WAS NOT QUOTED
CORRECTLY
REV. GIST SAYS HIS STATE
MENTS LAST SUNDAY NIGHT
WERE MISCONSTRUED BY SO
CIALIST.
Editor Daily World.
I have just read an article in the
World of Wednesday of this week,
written by "a well known socialist
of this city," in which some beauti
ful and true things are said of the
great American principle of "equal
rights to all and special privileges
to none," and in which he also in
forms us that the socialist party is
"a body of citizens who are earnest
ly endeavoring to discover some
equitable way" for making this prin
ciple practical.
While I question the wisdom and
practicability of their "way" for ac
complishing this much desired and
eminently desirable condition of so
ciety, I, of course, admit their right
to advocate this "way." But what
surprises me and leads me to make
reply is that the author of this arti
cle, if he were present last Sunday
'•vening to hear the poor "ignorant"
minister at the Christian church,
should have so far misunderstood!
him, or if understood, should so far
misrepresent his statements as to af
firm that "Rev. Gist charged them
with having, as a party, passed a
' resolution denying the existence of
| God." What I said was this: "A
convention of French socialists meet
ing in Paris, agreed on this, 'Resolv-,
cd. that the first thing necessary is
to get rid of the idea of God.' Then
I remarked, "It would seem that un
believers are aiding to carry out this
resolution." Can any one reasonably
i construe that statement into a charge
I that "Socialists, as a party, passed
a resolution denying the existence of
I God."
j Many socialists (1 am inclined to
think a majority of them here in
; America) believe as much as I in the
■ existence of God.
The undersigned minister may be
[ "ignorant" of many things he ought
|to know, but the free literature of
t socialistic character (and I am sorry
to say) sometimes of positively anar
; chistic character, which has been
thrust upon him through the mails
j for the past four years, ought to have
i kept him well posted on the teach
■ ings and progress of the socialist
i party. And now, that there may be
no chance to lay these statements at
the door of any other minister, I ven
ture to affix my own real name.
OWEN J. GIST
LEASED CHEWAWA
HOTEL
E. L. MANN. AN EXPERIENCED
HOTEL MAN OF SEATTLE, HAS
SECURED LEASE ON POPULAR
HOSTELRY.
E. L. Mann, an experienced hotel
man from Seattle, who has been here
several days this week, has se
cured lease on the Chewawa hotel,
the lease becoming effective as soon
as the building is remodeled to con
form to plans of Mr. Mann. For sev
eral years Mr. Mann has been run
ning a hotel and restaurant in the
university section of Seattle. He is
an old acquaintance of L. V. Wells,
of this city, and comes here very
highly recommended as a hotel man
and a public spirited citizen. He is
married and his wife will accompany
him to this city.
I p-Rivor Ileal Estate Still Moving.
The two feet of snow in the up
per Methow has not sufficed to stop
the real estate activity there. Many
persons are still in the field looking
for snaps in anticipation of the spring
advance in values. Lake & Rickerd
report some recent sales near Win
throp. and have two customers in
that vicinity now, one of whom is
F. W. Hoffman of Wenatchee.
Broke Plate Class.
The delivery horse belonging to
the Central Meat Market got into its
head this morning the idea of pulling
backwards and as a result the cart
was shoved through the plate glass
window in front of the Wenatchee
Billiard parlors, completely demolish
ing one of the large panes.
Wenatchee's Big Red Apple Daily
POOR APPLES
POOR PRICE
TWO CARLOADS OF YELLOW
NEWTOWNS CiO AT $1.20 A BOX
IN NEW YORK CITY—RAISED
ON DRY LAND.
Present dispatches state that two
carloads of Yellow Newtowns grown
at Dayton, Wash., sold in New York
last week at $1.20 a box. This is
the lowest price for any Washington
apples sold on eastern markets this
season. The low price does not indi
cate the falling off in the demand for
western apples, but it indicates a low
price for inferior apples. Wenatchee,
Yakima and Hood River apples are
all commanding prices ranging from
$3 to $4 in the eastern markets. Year
after year it is demonstrated that an
irrigated apple will command a much
higher price vhan that grown on non
irrigated land, but inferior packing,
poor sorting and non-irrigated land
is what is tending to undermine the
apple markets this season.
NOT RACK DEAL
OE GOODALL
HE SELLS ARCADIA LANDS IN
NEW YORK ON HIS OWN HOOK
—TRI'STEES OF CHAMBER SO
STATE. V
Spokane. Dec. 17.—The trustees of
thhe chamber of commerce have had
to deal this week with embarrassing
complications created by the publica
tion in Wenatchee newspapers of arti
cles identifying the Spokane Chamber
of Commerce with a private enter
prise of President F. E. Goodall.
President Goodall is in New York
with W. D. Finley. former assistant
secretary of the chamber of com
merce. E. H. Eshelman and H. W.
Hailing, formerly secretary of the
Wenatchee Commercial club, to sell
Arcadia lands in the northern part of
' Spokane county. Mr. Goodall has
'an option on 2,000 acres, and he
i and his associates have rented a
: storeroo mat Broadway and Forty-
I second street. New York, and are dis
; playing there a carload of Wenatchee
| apples and other exhibits to arouse
j interest in the Arcadia project,
j This has led to the publicantion in
i Wenatchee newspapers of items rep
resenting the venture as a Spokane
Chamber of Commerce exploitation,
and the trustees of the chamber of
commerce have appointed W. S. Mc-
Crea. C. M. Fassett and F. R. Cul
! bertson a committee to correspond
; with President Goodall and otherwise
j investigate the coupling of the name
!of the chamber of commerce with the
undertaking.
Much interest has been aroused
among the members and opinion is
divided as to whether the Arcadia
project is meritorious.
W. D. Finley was sent by President
1 Goodall to Wenatchee to buy the car
load of apples that is now on exhibi
tion in New York. After his visit
there the Wenatchee World printed
a news item connecting the purchase
with the Spokane Chamber of Com
merce.
This publication coming to the at
tention of some of the trustees of the
chamber of commerce. Secretary L.
G. Munroe was directed to send tele
grams to the Wenatchee newspapers
denying that the chamber of com
merce was in any way connected with
the project. Telegrams of denial
were also sent to the newspapers in
various apple growing districts of the
northwest. A telegram from Presi
dent Goodall denies that he author
ized any one to represent that the
chamber of commerce was behind his
scheme.
The Arcadia Land company has a
large tract oflo gged-off land about
30 miles north of Spokane, some of
which has been planted to apples and
is being put under irrigation.
Drowned in Spirit Lake.
Raymond Redhead received a tele
gram this morning of the drowning
of his brother Carl in Spirit Lake.
The young man was about 2f> years
of age and was skating on the lake
when he broke through the ice. The
body was recovered. Raymond Red
head left on No. 4 this afternoon to
be present at the funeral, which will
be held in Spokane.
5c PER COPY
m LEOPOLD
DIED LAST
NIGHT
BELGIUM RULER PASSED AWAY
AFTER MAKING A GALLANT
FIGHT AGAINST HIS INFIRMI
TIES—RKGKNCY COUNCIL
Brussels, Dec. 17.—A1l Brussels
mourns today for the death of their
ruler. King Leopold. The flags on
the public buildings are at half
mast and private houses are draped
in crepe. The body of the king whs
clothed in the uniform of a lieutenant
general and remains in the chamber
at Palms, where the death occurred.
It is surrounded only by those who
in life remained the king.-, closest
friends.
A regency council will nominally
hold the reins of the government un
til the heir to the throne. Prince Al
bert, has taken the oath of ascension.
Cardinal Mercier used every means
possible to persuade the kine to re
lent in his attitude towards his out
cast daughters, but was unsuccess
ful. The princesses, Louise and
Stephanie, who incurred the displeas
ure of their royal father, anxiously
awaited permission to go to his bed
side, but none came. Intestinal dis
orders was the cause of the king's
death.
A contest over the succession to
the throne of Belguim is possible.
The Vatican is reported to have con
firmed the marriage a year ago of
King Leopold to Baroness Vaughan.
Two sons are said to have been born
from this union and both survive.
The elder is Lucian. five years old.
It is reported he claims the throne.
Albert, the heir presumptive, is a
nephew of Leopold.
Paris, Dec. 17.—Dispatches from
the Rome Vatican confirm the mar
riage of King Leopold and Baroness
Vaughan at San Remo. Italy, last
year.
London, Dec. 17. —It is thought
here that the death of Leopold will
have little effect at present upon the
situation of Europe, apart from the
withdrawal from the scene of the man
who knew the innermost secrets of
every state and whose intellectual
and practical talents, especially in
former years, were frequently drawn
upon by brother sovereigns. It is
believed his removal will be followed
by new methods in Congo. All com
ment here lays at his door the re
sponsibility for the barbarities com
mitted in the Congo.
ZELAYA LOOKING
FOR FAVORS
Managua, Dec. 17.—President Taft
last night cabled a conciliatory mes
sage to President Taft saying that
he had shown his good faith in re
signing so that Nicaragua might as
sume friendly relations with the
United States. He added that he
proposed to leave the country, but
stood ready to account for his acts
as president.
Washington. Dec. 17. —The pass: ig
of President Zelaya, the dominant
influence for evil in Central Amer
ica, especially in Nicaragua, is re
garded here as a long step ia the
direction of better things Frequent
mention, however, of the name of
Madriz as his possible successor as
president of Nicaragua has not been
received with favor in official circles
in Washington. The very fact of
Madriz being reported as being Ze
laya's candidate presupposes an un
derstanding by which in the event of
the latter's succession to the presi
dency the great monopolies controlled
by Zelaya will be protected. It is im
probable, however, that this govern
ment will take active measures to
prevent the installation of Madriz as
president. It is well under that the
sending of warships to command
both Atlantic and Pacific ports in
Nicaragua with a view of protecting
Americans stimulating the revolu
tionists to more energetic action and
has disheartened Zelaya supporters.
The Friday Night Club.
The Friday Night Dancing club
will meet tonight, the 17th. at Elks
hall Dancing will begiu at yp. m.

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