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The Wenatchee daily world. [volume] (Wenatchee, Wash.) 1905-1971, December 23, 1909, Image 1

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86072041/1909-12-23/ed-1/seq-1/

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Watty Wwlfa
Wenatchee's Big Red Apple Daily
VOL. V. NO. 137.
FOSTER RAPIDS ARE
OPENED
■TATE COMMISSION DOING GOOD
WORK IN OPENING COLUMBIA
RIVER TO NAVIGATION —VOW
FOR BIG BOATS.
Considerable satisfaction is ex
pressed by river men in this city of
the work being done by the state
commission in clearing the upper
river of obstacles to navigation. The
irst and largest of the rocks at Fos
ter creek rapids, four miles from
Bridgeport, was blown out Tuesday
night.
The work of clearing out the rocks
which are a bar to navigation is be
ing done under the supervision of the
state commission. Work on the rocks
has been pushed for the past few
weeks under the supervision of Cap
tain Fred McDermott, executive com
missioner.
The big rock, according to the re
port made by Captain McDermott.
was broken intu small pieces and the
obstruction entirely removed. The
steamer Yakima, which has been pur
chased by the commission for work
on the river, will at once proceed a
short distance up the river to blow
out the second rock. When this is
done the river at the rapids will be
open to navigation for the largest
boats which ply the river. The sec
ond rock to be blown is small and
it is expected that the work there
will be finished within a few days.
Work on Upper River.
From Foster Creek the boat will
proceed to the upper Columbia,
where more work is to be done. It
is the intention of the commission to
expend half of the remaining sum on
hand, or as much thereof as may be
necessary, in the work of clearing the
upper river.
With the appropriation of $50,000
made by the state the commission
has already established a record for
economy in the matter of removing
obstructions to navigation. In addi
tion to the work at Foster creek a
number of other smaller rocks have
been removed by the use of a der
rick and carried to the banks of the
river.
While the state appropriation will
not be sufficient to make the river
safe and navigable at all seasons of
the year the commission hopes to re
move all of the chief obstructions so
that the river will be safe for large
boats during the period of high wat
**r. thereby aiding many farmers and
lumbermen located along the Colum
bia between Bridgeport and Kettle
Falls. At the present time these peo
ple have no other means of trans
portation than that by the river,
and the work done will be of great
benefit to them.
Football Conference in (Tiicago.
Chicago, Dec. 23. —The eyes of the
trig colleges in the middle west turn
ed today toward the Auditorium hotel
in this city, where the football
coaches and managers of the confer
ence schools met to settle definitely
the intercollegiate turmoil over next
reason's battles It is expected that
before the conference adjourns the
perplexing question of the University
of Michigan games and problems
bearing on the continuance of friend
ly relations in the "big eight" will be
definitely decided. Rumors are in
circulation that Michigan will peti
tion for readmission to the "big
eight," but it is not generally be
lieved that Michigan will take any
snch action. In case such action is
not taken it will be up to the con
ference to decide whether Minnesota
or any of the other conference schools
shall be permitted to contract for
games with Michigan next season.
Nothing From Hailing.
The officials of the Wenatchee
Commercial club have received no
word from W. H. Hailing, who re
cently went east with the carload of
apples purchased in this valley by
Spokane parties for exhibit in New-
York city. It has been learned that
the apples arrived in fine shape in
New York and are on dsplay there.
The Spokane Chamber of Commerce
members feel very indignant over the
publicity given to the fact that the
apples were bought in this valley and
by the chamber of commerce itself.
President Goodall, who recently pur
chased the apples for the purpose of
advertising the Arcadia enterprise,
is likely to lose his position as pres
dent or the chamber of commerce
on this account.
J. L. Holmes and wife will be in
Wenatchee Christmas to visit with
relatives.
STRAHORN BUYS
INTERURBAN
STATEMENT MADE IN YAKIMA
THAT NORTH COAST 11 AS PUR
CHASED SEATTLE - TACOMA
LINE.
The statement was made in North
Yakima today by a gentleman who
has a close connection with the
North Coast business that Strahorn
has bought the Stone & Webster in
terests in the Seattle-Tacoma inter
urban toad, and has thereby ac
quired an entrance to both of the
great Sound cities. He stated further
that the record of the transfer
would probably be filed in one or
both of the counties through which
the Interurban road runs, and he
volunteered the opinion that between
now and Christmas the identity of
Strahorn's backers—the great secret
which has agitated the railroad world
for the last four or five years—would
become known. —Yakima Republic.
R. R. MAN KILLED AT
HILLYARD
WILLIAM SCARRETT, FREIGHT
CONDUCTOR, JUMPED AND
FELL BETWEEN CARS—KNOWN
ALL ALONG G. N. LINE.
Hillyard. Dec. 23. —William Scar
rett, one of the oldest freight con
ductors on the Great Northern here,
was fatally injured about 4 o'clock
yesterday morning.
He attempted to jump from a mov
ing car to the tender of the engine,
when he slipped and fell between the
cars. One leg and one arm were cut I
off and his head was badly cut and
bruised. He was taken to Sacred
Heart hospital, but died shortly af-:
terward.
Mr. Scarrett had been with the
Great Northern for many years and
was considered one of the best freight
conductors on the road. He leaves a
wife and three children, living on
Ragol street, in a new home which
he built last summer.
Justice Moody Recovering.
Boston. Dec. 23.—Justice William '
,H. Moody of the United States SU
i preme court received many felicitous
| messages today on the occasion of his
I fifty-sixth birthday. For nearly two
! fined under treatment in a hossht
' months Justice Moody has been un
■ der treatment in his a hospital in !
i this city, and for a time his condi
tion was regarded as critical. He is
now reported to be well on the road
to recovery, though it is not expected!
•hat he will be able to take his place
on the supreme bench for some time;
to come. '
Fair Day Tomorrow.
Washington Fair tonight and
Friday, except rain Friday near the
coast.
MT.VERNON BUILDS
SEA WALL
Mount Vernon, Dec. 23. —Public
improvements aggregating consider
ably more than $100,000 are well
under way here. A gravity sewer
system is being built at a cost of
$1400.
In addition to this 1400 lineal feet
of concrete walk and curb are con
tracted for at a cost of 11 3-4 cents
per foot. Another 6000 feet of walks
will be build at a later date.
A concrete wall 1000 feet long is
to be built along the waterfront to
strengthen the dike and will be about
three and one-half feet above the
high water mark. In connection with
this, a sidewalk seven feet wide is
included and the whole will cost
about $5000. Between $60,000 and
$70,000 worth of asphalt and vitrified
brick pavement will probably be laid
early in the spring.
Visiting Here From Germany.
Mr. and Mrs. Ferdinand Heine, of
Dresden, Germany, are spending the
holidays with their son, Charles
Wildberger.
WENATCHEE. WASHINGTON, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1009.
ENGINEER JACOBS
IT IS SAID THAT NOTED RECLA
MATION OFFICIAL LOOKS WITH
FAVOR ON PROJECT TO IRRI
GATE THE QUINCY PLAT.
Quincy land owners are beginning
tn feel as though there is a possibil
ity of securing water for that big
tract of semi-arid land. During the
past several months Engineer Jac
obs, considered one of the best of
the reclamation service engineering
staff, spent several months making
data on the Quincy country and
studying the engineering problems
presented. He is now in Seattle and
last, week sent for President Ternent
of the Quincy Valley Water Users'
association, and told him to immedi
ately file on the waters of Pend Or
eille lake, securing a supply of water.
The further problems of diverting j
the water from that lake onto the
Quincy flat will be taken up later.
It is understood that Engineer Jacobs
looks with a good deal qf favor on
the possibility of watering the Quincy
country from that source. The water
will have to he carried some 200
miles. On account of the vast terri
tory to be watered it is understood
that there is plenty of capital avail
able for this purpose if the engineer
will recommend it. It is understood
that President Ternent has already
filed on the water rights on the lake
and made it a matter of record. As
a result of the work that is being
done by Engineer Jacobs and the lit
tle that has leaked out regarding his
report and his conclusions, the Quincy]
people are feeling very jubilant and |
there is great prospects of a land
boom iti that section. The water,
after 'leaving Pend Oreille, would fol
low down the Spokane river and by a
long tunnel would be diverted into;
the Grand Coulee and spread onto;
the land near Ephrata.
Aged Man to Asylum.
Joseph Lambert, a man of 81 years j
of age, was on yesterday committed
to the asylum at Medical Lake. He
is the father-in-law of M. W. Per
rine, of Malaga, and during the past
year has been a great care to the
family. On account of his age it
was thought best to send him to the
asylum, where he could probably
get. better care than he could at
home. Guard W. W. Railen came
in from Medical Lake yesterday and
took the patients Mettlin and Lam
bert to the asylum.
FINISH BRIDGES OB
FORFEIT BOND
WHITMAN COMMISSIONERS ISSUE
ULTIMATUM TO CONTRACTOR
I. J. BAILEY—TIME LIMIT LONG
EXPIRED.
The county commissioners of
Whitman county have notified the
American Bonding company of Balti
more, which furnished the indemnity
bond for I. J. Bailey of Wenatchee,
to whom was awarded a contract for
constructing eight county bridges,
that unless the work on the two
structures still unfinished is rushed
to completion the bond will be de
clared forfeited.
At the time the contract was
awarded it was stipulated between
Bailey and the commissioners that
the bridges were to be finished by
August 1, and soon after work was
begun a further extension of time
was asked and the limit was then
set for November 1, but the Stipe
bridge, near Diamond, is still not
more than half finished, and the Mat
lock bridge has not been begun.
The board recently notified Bailey
that his time limit had expired and
asked him what he intended to do,
and no reply being received it was
decided to take the matter up with
the bonding company.
Rev. O. J. Gist left today for
Cover d'Alene, Idaho, where he will
spend Christmas with his family. He
will return next Wednesday. The
pulpit at the Christian church will
be supplied during his absence.
Mr. and Mrs. Lyman Bardin en
tertained at dinner yesterday, Mr.
and Mrs. John England, who leave
today for Oroville, their future home.
Member of the Associated Press
CORNERING APPLE
SCIONS
EASTERN NURSERY HOUSES ARE
MAKING STRONG KID FOR
NATCHEE VALLEY APPLE
SCIONS.
Nurserymen are complaining that
eastern nursery houses are buying
up all the apple scions that, they can
get in the Wenatchee district. Some
claim that the eastern men are en
countering a demand for Wenatchee
goods that must be met. while others
hold that the easterners are merely
trying to effect a corner in order to
M il their own Delicious scions
are particularly hard to get now, and
the opinion prevails that tbe popular
ity of the Delicious has been so great
that the eastern people have been
compelled to fry to buy it from the
market. Mr. Schwartz, agent for the
Van Holderbeke nursery, has not
been in the market for scions and
was inclined to think that the out
side buyers were simply buying for
demand, rather than as a corner.
Mr. Snyder of the C. & O. nursery
feels that.the growers should not be
so eager to ship past the home mar
ket and states that he has had con
siderable difficulty in getting a big
enough stock for the demands of next
year.
County Inspector Darlington, when
seen this morning, stated that he had
heard complaints from other nur
serymen to the same effect. A car
load of Delicious scions is ready to be
made up now for shipment to the
east.
HE DID NOT CLIMB
M'KIEY
New York, Dec. 23.- The report of
the special committee to investigate
Cook's claims to having reached the
summit of Mt. McKinley was deliver
ed to the governor's explorer's club
t(day. While the investigators will
not divulge the text of the report
they do not deny that it discredits
Cook's claims.
ARE MARKED BY
I. W. W.
Spokane. Dec. 23.— Nelson S.
Pratt, mayor ;S. A. Mann, judge of
| the municipal court, and John T. Sul
j livan, chief of the police department
iof Spokane, are "marked men," ac
cording to letters received by them
from Chicago and other cities in the
middle west. The writers say the
i three officials are doomed to destruc
j tion, because of their activity in
| hreaking up the Industrial Workers
of the World, more than 200 mem-
I hers of which, mostly foreigners,
j have been sentenced to jail during
the last five weeks, for violating the
city ordinance regarding public
speaking. Others were convicted of
conspiracy. The general tone of the
j letters Is the officials will not be
j spared if they remain in the city af-
Iter a certain time. Judge Mann has
j received offers from a dozen sources
j to guard him to and from his home to
j the city hall, also to protect his home
1 during his absence and at night, but
jhe has not accepted any. saying he is
! able to take care of himself. Mayor
| Pratt and Chief Sullivan declare
they sire ready to call the bluff.
International Rugby Contests.
Vancouver, B. C. Dec. 23. —The
Rugby team of the University of
California has arrived here to play a
series of contests with the Vancou
ver union Rugby team for the inter
national championship honors. The
first game will be played on Christ
mas day. The second contest will
take place Wednesday of next week
and the third and last of the series
will be played on New Year's day.
The Vancouver team comprises the
best Rugby players of British Colum
bia and is expected to give the in
vaders a hard tussel for the Keith
cup, emblematic of the international
championship, and which was taken
to California last year by the Stan
ford university team.
C. A. Harris of Entiat goes through
tomorrow en the way to Seattle.
TO MARKET ADRIAN
TOWNSITE
WENATCHEE VALLEY LAND CO.
HAS CONTRACT ON TOWNSITE
OF LITTLE BURG MIDWAY BE
TWEEN HERE AND SPOKANE.
Messrs. Oliver and Duller of the
Wenatchee Valb-v Land company, this
week closed a contract for 120 acres
of land, including the Adrian town
site from C. F. Berlet. This town
site is to be placed on the market
shortly after the first of the year.
During the past year considerable
attention has been directed to Adrian
on account of the possibilities of mak
ing this quite a railroad center. It
is on the main line of the Great
Northern, practically midway between
Wenatchee and Spokane. It is the
terminus of the Washington Central
and by June 1 it will be connected
with the Northern Pacific by a branch
line running from Adrian to Connell.
This line is already graded and it is
expected that the rails will be laid
by June 1 and the road turned over
to the operating department.
Furthermore, Adrian is destined to
be quite an irrigated section. Already
the Adrian Irrigation company has
run a long ditch from a little lake
back of Stratford, and will eventually
water from 3.000 to 4.000 acres of
land. About 500 acres adjacent to
the Adrian townsite has been plant
ed to apples. This stock was fur
nished by the Home Nursery com
pany of Wenatchee and what work
has been done is very thorough. Dur
ing the coming spring this company
also plans to put in several hundred
additional acres to fruit trees. Other
irrigation etnerprises are in an incipi
ent stage and it is likely that during
the coming season there will be sev
eral other projects undertaken there.
There is a great wheat country ad
jacent to this little town and during
the coming season there will be locat
ed quite a string of warehouses.
Every indication points to the fact
that Adrian will soon become the
commercial center of Grant county
and already there has been consider
able talk of making this place the
permanent county seat of Grant
county.
This townsite was platted last sum
mer by the Prowell Engineering com
pany and after the first of the year
the Wenatchee Valley Land company
expects to put this plat on sale and
it is expected that Wenatchee citi
zens will take advantage of the op
portunity to get in on the ground
floor in this new town.
MAY END STRIKE
18DAY
CONFERENCE OF CONTENDING
FACTIONS HAS BEEN HELD
ALL DAY ANT) IT IS THOUGHT
A SETTLEMENT IS NEAR.
St. Paul, Minn., Dec. 23. —The end
Of the switchmen's strike is indicated
j today. It is thought that the men
will return to work tomorrow. Presi
dent Perham of the American Fed
! eration of Labor of the railway de
| partment council, said: "I believe
j the strike will be closed today. The
| 2 cents differential in wages said to 1
j have been granted the men of the
i mountain division will not hinder
! negotiations."
J. M. Gruber, general manager of j
'the Great Northern, George T. Slade,
' third vice president of the Northern
Pacific, Chairman Perham of the
i railroad council of the American
i Federation of Labor, and Frank T.
j Hawley, president of the switchmen's
| union, with Gov. A. O. Eberhardt of
j Minnesota have been in conference
I all day on the strike situation.
Harper's Weekly on A pie Lands.
An entire page of Harper's Week
ly for this month is devoted to a
description of the apple industry of
the west. Hood River gets the best
display, but Incidentally Wenatchee
and Yakima are mentioned in the
article. During the past year a great
portion of the big weekly and month
ly magazines have devoted a great
deal of space to the apple industry
of the west and as a result this fact
is getting a great deal of very effec
t'.ve advertising.
Wenatchee's Big Red Apple Daily
TWO NEW INCOR
PORATIONS
WELLS a MORRIS INCORPORATE
THEIR HARDWARE BUSINESS
AND ALSO HEAD IRRIGATION
COMPANY.
Articles of incorporation were filed
this week with the secretary of state
and also with the county auditor for
Wells & Morris of Wenatchee. The
capital stock is given at $100,000 and
the incorporators are A. Z. Wells.
A. L. Morris and E. S. Wells. This
incorporation is for the hardware
and implement business in this city.
The Methow Land and Irrgation
company of Wenatchee is the other
incorporation which these men head.
It is incorporated for $100,000 and
the stockholders are A. Z. Wells. E.
Messerly. A. L. Morris anj A. E.
Messerly. This incorporation is for
the handling of a large tract of state
land which these men recently se
cured on the Columbia river below-
Pat eros.
DRIVING CONTEST
FOR CHRISTMAS
OWNERS OF FAST HORSES HAVE
ARRANGED FOR DRIVING CAR
NIVAL TO BE PI LLED OFF ON
CHELAN AVENUE AT lO A. M.
There are quite a number of fast
horses in this valley and the owners
have arranged for a contest for
Christmas day on Chelan avenue.
There will be two events- one for
horses under seven years old and the
other for horses more than 7 years
old. The contest commences at 10
o"clock sharp and a number of pri
zes have been provided for the win
ners. Charles Brown, of Chelan. An
sel Griggs and Judge Martin have
already entred for the under seven
year-old class and Judge Martin, M.
O. Merrill and E. V. Martin have en
tered for the over seven-year-old
class.
Chelan avenue is an ideal course
and it is expected that this contest
will be witnessed by a large number
of driving enthusiasts in this city.
The prizes will be given to fhe win
ners in two out of three heats.
COLD SNAP DELAYS FREIGHT
Force Pumps and Torcln's Used to
Thaw Frozen Grease.
Zero weather throughout the Ua
kotas. Minnesota. Montana and the
Inland Empire is delaying freight
traffic on the Great Northern and
Northern Pacific railways, trouble be
ing experienced in starting the heavy
tranis after Jack Frost has sealed
tight the axle boxes, making the
waste and grease a frozen mass.
Brakemen and car repairers in the
yards of both lines where cars have
been stored solved the problem by
heating the boxes and melting the
ice by the aid of torches and force
pumps.
Agent Piper of the Great Northern
states that there is no difficulty in
handling the freight in the local
yard. For instance, he states, that
all freight received during the night
was cleaned up thts* forenoon and
that there is no difficulty whatever
in taking care of everything that
comes into the yard here.
STILL FIGHTING 111
NICARAGUA
Blueflelds. Dec. 23.—Estrada, it is
said, will imemdiately assume the
offensive against Government Presi
dent Madriz. The insurgent leader
holds that the Zelaya element was
removed from consideration by the
sweeping battle of Rama. The march
on Managua Is believed to be immi
nent. The prisoners captured at
Rama have been well fed and all
who now espouse the cause of Estra
da will be armed and enrolled in the
ranks of the insurgents.
There will be an important church
business meeting of the Baptists to
night at 7:30 at the church.
A CURE THAI DID
NOl CURE
SHERIFF FERGUSON TELLS HOW
HK TRIED TO CURB JOHN
WEIGAND OF A HALLUCINA
TION \M> FAILED.
In discuss ing the two cases of in
sanity tried in the superior court
yesterday, Sheriff Ferguson toid of
the case of John Weigand, the black
smith employed at the Valley Power
company and who was commtited to
the insane asylum at Medical Lake
a few weeks ago. The man appar
ently was sane on every subject but
one. He said that he was being fol
lowed by a man and woman and he
had made his room at tbe Valley
Power company station a veritable
arsenal. He slept with a tomahawk
under his pillow and had revolvers,
rifles and other weapons stationed
near his bed. On being brought to
Wenatchee, in a conversation he
stated that he thought he was not
crazy but that his hearing had been
developed to such an extent that he
could hear people talking a half mile
away. He said that a man and wo
man were following him and had been
bothering him so that he could not
have any peace at all; that this wo
man wanted to marry him and he
did not want anything to do with her
He told of her being a bad woman
and that the man was no good and
that officers ought to grab him and
lock him up. as there was a reward
of $:.00 offered for him.
The sheriff questioned him and
conceived a brilliant idea. Said Sher
iff Ferguson to the man:
"Did you leave those people at
Peshastin?"
""No: they came down on the train.
The? follow mc around all the time.
They tire right down on the street
now. I can hear them talking."
"1 cannot hear anyone talking.'
.-aid the sheriff.
"Your ears are not developed like
mine are. They are laughing about
it. They think thaf you folks have
got me now."
After fhe examination by the doc
tors it was found that he was per
fectly sane except on this one sub
ject.
Said the sheriff: 'I figured that if
I could convince him that I had them
under arrest that it might result in
a cure, so I asked him the descrip
tion of the man and woman. He said
that the woman was small, dressed in
blue and had a red collar around her
neck. So l told him that we would
try to find them and put them in
jail. H> said. 'That is the ;hin<-: to
do. because they are bad people.
Yes; that is the thing to do. Put
them in jail."
The next morning I went down in
the jail and said to him. 'Well. John,
those people did not bother you last
night, did they?*
" Sure they did. They were right
outside here last night.'
" 'No; you are mistaken. We ar
! rested them last night and put them
in the lety jail. They could not have
: been around here last night.'
" 'You must be mistaken.' said
John.
" 'No, I am not mistaken I know
that we have the right people 1
j " 'Waif a minute. Wait a min
ute. Listen! They are talking now.
j The woman is talking to the man. She
; just said to him, "Those d offi
cers. They though? that they had
i us. but they didn't.
The sheriff has resolved that in
most instances it is waste of time to
attempt to cure the hallucinations of
crazy people.
Olympia. Dec. 23.—The Okanogan
county commissioners are not liable
personally for allowing bills against
the county for the building of the
bridge at Okanogan if it should trans
pire that the bridge contract is il
legal, advises the attorney general in
a letter today to the prosecuting at
torney of that county. The opinion
says:
"As I understand the law. where an
officer is required to use his discre
tion and acts in a quasi-judicial capa
city, he is not liable personally for
any mistake of law or fact that he
may make unless he acts through
malice or corrupt motives."
"It is therefore my opinion that if
the county commissioners allow, ap
prove and pay the bills for the bridge
at Okanogan under the circumstances
mentioned in your letter, they will
not be liable personally for so doins_\
and I would further say that in my
opinion there can be no just criticizm
against the commissioners for so do
ing."
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