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The Wenatchee daily world. [volume] (Wenatchee, Wash.) 1905-1971, January 03, 1910, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86072041/1910-01-03/ed-1/seq-1/

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Wenatchee's Big Red Apple Daily
VOL. V. NO. 145.
WANT TAFT 10
CULL OFF
STRIKE
•WITCHM EN LOOK FORWARD TO
GOOD RESULTS FROM VISIT OP
PBRHAM TO WASHINGTON. D. C.
—HAWI.EV WIRES COAST.
Washington, Jan. 3.—Parties to
Hie conference over the situation of
♦be striking switchmen of the north
west railroads agree that no new de
velopments had arisen since last
Friday.
The center of the scene in the
switchmen's strike has been shifted
from the Twin Cities to Washington,
p. C. and the strikers have hitched
their wagon to a new star.
Telegraphic reports to the effect
that Chairman H. B. Perham of the
railway department of the American
Federation of Labor, has been in
conference with President Taft and
the heads of the department of com
merce and labor, reached the coast
yesterday. The report stated that
ihe conference was to be discontinued
Saturday afternoon, to be taken up
vgain on Monday.
According to the report which came
!rom President Hawley of the Switch
men's Union of North America, held
out hopes of a successful outcome of
the conference. Should the confer
ence fail, it is believed that a strike
of the other railway organizations of
tbe A. F. of L. will result. Chair
man Perha mis quoted as saying that
in the event of the failure of the
conference such a strike is altogether
within probability.
The strike situation on the N. P.
has not improved. It seems diffi
cult to secure strikebreakers who will
stay with the job. A number of new
strikebreakers are reported to have
arrived on the coast Saturday after
soon. Numerous altercations be
tween the strikebreakers and other
railroad employes have been report
ed.
/
Washington, Jan. 3. —"If an ami
cable adjustment of the differences
between the northwestern railroad?
and the switchmen is not reached
through the mediation conference
here the strike will spread and prob
ably 20,000 men will be called out,"
declared H. B. Perham, head of the
railway department of the American
Federation of Labor. "This increase
will not be among the switchmen
alone, but will come from other or
ganizations, such as boilermakers
and affiliated organizations. The
switchmen are for peace, if possible,
but are determined on a general
strike if plans for mediation fail."
Mr. Perham added, however, that
he is hopeful of a peaceful settle
ment. No affiliated organization will
take sympathetic action pending the
result of Mr. Perham's conference
with the mediation board, which will
be resumed Monday. The American
Federation of Labor has left the
whole matter in the hands of Mr.
Perham, who is head of the Order
of Railway Telegraphers and a mem
ber of the executive committee of the
federation.
No decision has been reached by
the mediation board as to the selec
tion of a third arbitrator in the case
of the dispute between the Illinois
Central and its switchmen.
One at a Time.
Minneapolis. Minn., Jan. 3. —If it
ia decided to call a sympathetic strike
of the railway department of the
American Federation of Labor to
help the switchmen now on strike on
(he northwestern railroads, all the
organizations in the department will
uot be called out at, once. A single
union will go out first and ten days
later, if the railroads still refuse to
accede to the demands of the switch
men, other railroad organizations of
the federation will be called out.
This was the statement made by a
prominent official of the federation.
President Hawley, of the switch
men, it is said, has all along urged
that several organizations be called
out simultaneously. Chairman Per
ham of the affiliated unions, however.
Ib said to favor the "one at a time"
plan. Just which organization will
start the ball rolling, if any, union
officials refuse to divulge.
A strike vote has be'en taken by
(Continued on Page 4.)
BOUGHT 20 ACRES
FOR $28,000
MESSRS. SANDERS AND MILLER,
MEN WHO PURCHASED MARVIN
CHASE PLACE, ALSO BOUGHT
WHEELER TRACT.
The Siissea Fannie T. Wheeler 20-
--acre tract adjoining the Lewis-Clark
was sold on Saturday to
William- L. Sanders and Frank D
Miller for $28,000. The purchasers
are the men who recently bought the
Marvin Chase 20-acre tract south
west of the city. The Wheeler place
is planted to orchard six and seven
years old, half of it being peaches and
the other half apples. It is consider
ed one of th<- best commercial apple
orchards in the valley.
Mr. Sanders is a large property
owner at Lake Chelan and for the
past 20 years has been very familiar
with conditions in this valley and is
very much pleased with the buy. Mr
Miller is in the United States forestry
service, stationed at the state uni
versity. Both men are practical or
chardists and have great faith in the
Wenatchee valley. This sale was
made through the Deniston & Chris
tenson and Ira D. Edwards agencies.
ENDANGERING EI
PHION
CITIZENS ENDEAVOR TO PR*:-
VENT PIPES FROM FREEZING
AND DEPLETE THE WATER
SUPPLY IN THE RESERVOIRS.
The water in the reservoirs is
getting too low to be of much ser
vice for Are protection on account of
the drains made upon it by the house
holders who are afraid that their wa
ter pipes will freeze. They have been
leaving so many hydrants open this
cold weather that the reservoirs can
not maintain normal supplies of wa
ter, and in case of fire in some parts
of town the department could do
nothing at all except with its limited
chemical apparatus. Freezing in the
pipes can be prevented by a less
wasteful emthod. Practically all
houses have a stop and waste valve
that will shut the water off through
out the house and drain the pipes. It
is not as easy to get at as the fau
cets in the rooms, but serves the pur
pose just as well and does not de
plete the reservoirs.
Conference of Railroad Men.
Washington. Jan. 3.—President
Taft had an extended conference to
day with the presidents of six big
railways of the country who had re
quested a hearing with him before his
special message dealing with inter
state commerce law amendments
should be sent to congress. The rail
road men came to present their views
regarding various phases of the pro
posed recommendations as they have
gleaned them from speeches of Presi
dent Taft made from time to time.
Those attending were Attorney Gen
eral Wickersham, President Mellen.
of the New York, New Haven & Hart
ford; President McCrea of the Penn
sylvania; President Lovett of the
Union Pacific and allied Harriman
lines; President Baer of the Philadel
phia & Reading; President Finley of
the Southern railway, and President
Brown of the New York Central.
Entertained Engineering Force.
One of the very pleasant social
events of New Year's day, was the
dinner given by City Engineer C. C.
Ward to the office and field force of
his department. Tn addition to the
holly and crimson bells of the holi
day season throughout the rooms,
the table was beautifully decorated
with crimson carnations and ribbons
and ropes of smilax, and the menu
of the six course dinner repeated as
far as possible the holiday colors
The guests were Messrs. Prowell,
Thompson, Haskell, Sidener, Wasson,
Snyder, Hines. Gray and Duff of the
engineering department and W. M.
Olive.
Bought Dexter Tract.
E. B. Norell last week purchased
the old Dexter place adjoining the
fair grounds from Percy Walker, pay
ing for it $15,000. The tract con
sists of 6*4 acres, a brick house and
is planted to orchard.
WENATCHEE. WASHINGTON, MONDAY, JANUARY 3, 1910.
PINCHOT WILL GET
THEJ
ALDRICH AND CANNON, BALLIN
GER MEN, WILL APPOINT COM
MITTEE TO INVESTIGATE THE
MATTER.
Washington. Jan. 2. — "Forester
Cifford Pinchot is to get the ax." is
the general report in the capital, first
whispered by high officials in favor
at the White House and filtering
through various sources to the news
paper men.
"Will Taft dare to do it?" This is
the usual interrogative reply. It is
clear that relations between Pinchot
and the president are now strained to
the breaking point.
Crafty old politicians like Champ
Clerk and Senator Tillman grin elo
quently when informed of the gossip
and Tillman said significantly, "Not
yet—but soon."
Policies "Carried Out."
The thing which deters Taft is the
knowledge that Pinchot has behind
him the support of the conservation
movement, which has captured the
imagination of the people, and above
all, the support of Roosevelt, whose
return is the bogy which affrights
the Taft administration. "What will
Roosevelt say? What will Roosevelt
do?" These are questions everywhere
current, when people point to the
"carrying out" (lifeless) of the
Roosevelt policies and to the presence
of Roosevelt's oldtime enemies now
seen sitting, bold and confident, in
the seats of the might.
Ballinger Controls.
So far, every move made towards
Investigation has been controlled by
the friends of Ballinger and Taft. The
president and his "official family" are
very active. Senator Wesley Jones and
Representative Humphrey of Wash
ington will introduce In the two
houses the resolutions providing for
the Investigation and both have come
out openly as avowed partisans of
Ballinger. Senator Aldrich, control
ling in the senate, and Speaker Can
non, czar in the house, are unequiv
ocal partisans of Ballinger and will
appoint the committee of Investiga
tion.
It Is publicly proclaimed, from au
thoritative sources that no move is
made for the Investigation upon
which Ballinger is not consulted.
Senator Jones told the senate in a
speech that he was a partisan of Bal
linger. Humphrey made the same
statement and Jones inserted in the
Congressional Record Ballinger's let
ter anent the investigation, indicating
the course to be followed.
Wiseacres on both sides of the con
troversy agree on this prediction:
"Pinchot is certain to get the ax."
Mr. Libby and Bon arrived this
morning from the Methow valley and
went on to Spokane.
TRAIN WAS SNI
BOUND
MANSFIELD - \VENATCTFEK TRAIN
CAUGHT IN BLIZZARD SATUR
DAY BELOW DOUGLAS AND NOT
RELEASED UNTIL TODAY.
The Wenatehoe-Mansneld train was
snow-bound from Saturday omrning
until this morning. This train was
due here at noon but the wind on
the plateau was a regular blizzard
and piled the loose snow onto the
track in such quantities that the regu
lar train could not buck through it.
Relief was furnished this morning
and a rotary cleared the track. It
is said that the snow on the plateau
is from three to four feet in depth
and the whirling wind piled it up in
the cuts ten and twelve feet deep.
Trainmen say that last Saturday was
a fearful day to railroad on the new
branch.
Thought it Was Pacific Avenue.
Jim Davidson, of Tacoma, was on
the street last night and stated to a
World reporter that he thought he
was on Pacific avenue, Tacoma
Everything was closed up except a
few cigar stands, and the cold wea
ther was a factor, too. in keeping
people off of the streets, so that
Davidson was only able to And about
six persons on the street. He said
it was just like home.
Member of the Associated Press
BURLINGTON TRAIN
BURNED
TRAIN WHICH PASSED THROUGH
HERE FRIDAY NIGHT MET DIS
ASTER NEAR GREAT FALLS,
MONT.-—THREE MEN KILLED.
The Burlington train, No. 43.
which passed through here Friday
night met with a disaster near
Great Falls, Mont., on Saturday. It
was traveling along in a blinding
snowstorm and collided with an on
coming Burlington westbound freight.
The accident was near Oxford Sid
ing on the Billings line of Judith
Gap. Three men were killed, ten
were injured and the greater portion
of the passenger train was consumed
by fire. The wreck occurred at 10
o'clock at night.
This train was about seven hours
late and the engineer was pushing
her through the storm to keep from
falling further behind. In the blind
ing storm he failed to observe the
lantern of the flagman, and being un
able to observe the lights on the
stalled locomotive* dashed headlong
into the obstruction. The engine was
hurled to one side of the track in
stantly killing the fireman and in
juring the engineer, who was also
scalded by escaping steam.
The tender telescoped with the
mail car, killing Mail Clerk Gibson,
the only occupant.
The three cars following were de
railed and the passengers hurled
from their seats. The tender of the
freight engine was overturned, but
the locomotive and caboose remained
upon the track and the impact of the
collision started them down grade
and they traveled for a long distance
from the wreck.
The wreck occurred at 10:10 p. m.,
but being a considerable distance
from a station it was not until some
time after midnight that a passen
ger reached Bercai! and telephoned
the first report.
Some time after the accident the
wreckage caught fire and the bag
gage and mail cars, smoker and day
coach were entirely consumed.
The sleepers and dining car had
remained on tbe track and were
saved.
In the fire the body of the mail
clerk was incinerated.
G. V BUILDS DEPOT AT ODESSA
Stmrture Will Be 112 by SO Feet,
With Long Platforms.
Odessa, Wash., Jan. 3.—Active
work has begun on the new Great
northern depot at Odessa and it Is
expected that the work will be push
ed rapidly to completion. The depot
will be much larger than was at first
expected, the plans being recalled
some time ago and changed. The
building now planned will be a mod
ern one, 112 feet long by 30 feet In
width. Along the front will be a plat
form 16 feet in width and 300 feet
long. At both ends and the back will
be a platform 12 feet wide.
The floor plans Include waiting
rooms for both women and men with
ticket office conveniently arranged so
as to be reached from either waiting
room.
Increased Ten Fold.
The Dally World of Friday record
ed the sale of the corner opposite the
Great Northern hotel to the Wenat
chee Realty & Investment company
for $12,500. In talking of this pur
chase O. B. Fuller, of the purchasing
company, stated th * five years ago
he was offered this 75 feet for $1,250
but refused it. The Columbia Valley
bank atferwards purchased it at this
price. The sale last week was made
for $12,500. an increase of ten fold
in the value of this property during
the past five years. This is about the
proportionate gain of all inside busi
ness property in tkis city during the
past five years.
Miss Godfrey Entertained.
Miss Sadie Godfrey entertained at
her home, on Chelan avenue, last
Saturday evening. Cards and music]
were the order of the evening. Those
present were: Alice Olinger, Sadie
Godfrey. Zoe Ward, Myrtle Rogers,
Evelyn Vincent, Jennie Anderson,
Messrs. Herwick, Bertie, Vermilya,
Whltehill, Covert, Godfrey and Now
lan.
Commissioners in Session.
The board of county commissioners
is in session today. This is the regu
lar January term and there is/ con
siderable accumulated business on
hand. /
COMPULSORY LAW
ENFORCED
LAW BREAKERS MADE TO PAY
FINES, COSTS AND TRAVELING
EXPENSES— SUPERINTENDENT
BOWERSOX DETERMINED.
Two cases of continued absence
from schools were brought to the at
tention of Superintendent Bowersox
and the parents were summoned to
appear before Justice Sumner last
Friday. The two cases were entered
as the State vs. George Slater, and
the State vs. Alice Michael.
Cecil Slater, aged 12, was sho-vn
to have been continually irregular in
attendance, and Sadie Stoddard,
aged 14, daughter of Mrs. Alice
Michael, was found to have been ab
sent unnecessarily. In each case the
parents had to pay fines, costs and
traveling expenses, enough to make
them observe the law carefully
In the future.
Both cases were from the Entiat
school, District 21. A change has re
cently been made in the school law
that makes it include children be
tween the ages of 15 and 16 who are
not engaged in useful and remuner
ative occupations. Section 392 of
the school law follows:
Section 1. All parents, guardians
and other persons in this state, hav
ing, or who may hereafter have im
mediate custody of any child between
8 *and 15 years of age (being be
tween the Bth and 15th birthdays),
or of any child between 15 and 16
years of age (being between the 15th
and 16th birthday) not regularly en
gaged in some useful and remunerat
ive occupation, shall cause such chili
to attend the public school of the dis
trict, in which the child resides, for
the full time when such school may
be in session or to attend a private
school for the same time, unless the
superintendent of tbe schools for the
district in which the child resides. If
there be such a superintendent, and
in all other cases the county super
intendents of common schools shall
have excused such child from attend
ance because the child is physically
or mentally unable to attend school,
or has already attained a reasonable
proficiency in the branches required
by law to be taught in the first eight
grades of the public schools of this
state, as provided by the course of
study of such school, or for some
other sufficient reason. Proof of ab
sence from the public schools, or ap
proved private schools, shall be prima
facie evidence of a violation of this
section.
Jack LilTis and Dave Stine are now
in Tampa. Florida. They will leave
in a few days for Cuba, and after a
stay there of some few weeks will
go to Tully, New York, where Mr.
Llllis will visit relatives, returning
here some time about the first of
April.
FATAL 01 WITH
MOTHER IH-LAW
TENNESSEE MAN PACEI> AGED
WOMAN AND AFTER A QUAR
REL A FUST LADE OF BULLETS
W*ERE FIRED.
Dresden, Term., Jan. 3. —Clarence
Carney faced his 65 year old mother
in-law in a revolver duel last night
and was killed. The mother-in-law,
Mrs. Sarah Griffith, had met Carey
in the front yard of a neighbor to
discuss a quarrel of long standing.
The discussion became heated, re
volvers were flashed and Carney fired
three times at the aged woman, one
bullet struck her hip. She stood her
ground, firing Aye times before Car
ney fell dead. About a year ago Car
ney's wife suicided by taking car
bolic acid.
Much Coal Being Received.
Thirteen cars of coal were received
in the city yesterday. This was
billed out of Seattle on December 28
and made very good time to this city.
The cars received yesterday are be
ing unloaded today. This relieves the
fuel situation for the time being. All
freight received here, even though
there is a strike in progress among
the Great Northern switchmen, al
ways receives prompt attention and
there is no congestion in the freight
department. .
Wenatchee's Big Red Apple Daily
HOLD JACK RABBIT
PARTIES
CAPT. USHER ESCORTS PARTIES
OF WENATCHEE SPORTSMEN
TO ROCK ISLAND — SERVES
GAME IN ALL STYLES.
The winter jackrabbit crop down
at Rock Island is especially good this
year, and Captain Usher has been
providing a number of hunting par
ties with free transportation to his
place and free jackrabbit barbecue
in the hopes of getting some relief
from the pests. A party of 13 went
down to the captain's place last Sat
urday and secured 13 of the ferocious
beasts that were lurking in the shade
of the young apple trees. The cap
tain could not be found today, but
it is said that he is looking for hunt
ers all the time, and that besides
giving free transportation to all com
ers, he is providing free jackrabbit
soup, free Jackrabbit stew and free
jackrabbit pie. The jacks do not get
over onto this s,ide of the river at
all, and are pretty well hunted out
in the neighborhood of the Wenat
chee bridge. But down the river a
ways, on the west side, they are quite
numerous and are causing much in
jury to the orchards.
CORRAL CAYUSES
AT EPHRATA
HORSEMEN TAKE LIVES IN
HANDS BY RIDING AT TOP
SPEED OVER FROZEN PLAINS—
WILD HORSES POORLY FED.
Ephrata, Jan. 3. —Central Wash
ington horsemen are joining forces at
this season and rounding up range
horses that earlier in the year gave
their saddle horses the chase of their
lives and then foiled them in at
tempts to corral them. Because of
the poor condition of the range at
this time of the year the wild horses
are poorly fed and are easily run
down and corralled by the grain-fed.
well-kept cow ponies.
The great expanse or arid !and
south and west of Ephrata is the
scene of one of the last roundups of
the times, as the wild horse is slowly
vanishing from the plains of the west.
Range riders daily take their lives
In their hands by dashing after the
wild horses at breakneck speed
through frozen areas honeycombed
with desert badger holes. The recent
thaw and freeze have made the side
hills slippery and tbe gritty cow
ponies keep their feet with difficulty.
Heavy fogs hang over the grazing
lands and riders are often lost when
night falls and homecoming time ar
rives.
Horsemen in this district have
combined forces and hired a camp
wagon and cook to follow the riders.
Camp is moved during the day and
the hardy horsemen sleep under the
stars in their blankets at night.
Tomist Clnb Annual Party.
One of the pleasantest social events
of the season was the annual party
given by the Tourist Literary club,
at the home of Mrs. H. H. Whittaker_
on Friday afternoon, December 31.
Recitations by Miss Doris Jones and
Miss Vida Van Cleave were enjoyed
by all. The old year and the new
year were admirably represented by
Mrs. Robert Murray and nephew of
four years, Charlie Porter. Progress
ive games finished the program, after
which dainty refreshments were
served. About 60 were present, in
cluding members and invited guests.
llin-StAuffer.
At four o'clock in the afternoon of
Christmas day, Mr. W. W. UHn of
Wenatchee, Wash., was united in
marriage to Miss Clara J. Stauffer of
Lancaster. The wedding took place
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. H. B.
F. Keen at Bird-in-Hand. The cere
monye was performed by Rev. H. J.
Hillegrass, pastor of the Salem Re
formed church at Heller's. The fol
lowing guests were present: Mrs.
T. H. Stauffer, Paul Stauffer, Misses
Mary E. and Hilda Stauffer. all of
Lancaster; H. B. F. Keen and Miss
Clara Keen. The couple will reside
at Havillah, Wash. —Lancaster, N.
V., Times.
Marriage Licenses.
John L. Larson; Chelan, to Anna
Jacobson. Wenatchee.
HEARD FBI
I! CM AID
iff
BROTHER SAYS EXPLORER AND
WIFE ARE IX RETIREMENT—
HAVE NOT COVEN UP FIGHT
FOR CLAIM TO DISCOVERY.
New York. Jan. 3. —William L.
Cook, a brother of Dr. Frederick A.
Cook, declared today that Mrs. Cook
has joined her husband and that he
is in communication with them. Mrs.
Cook is asserted to have the explor
er's original records of his north
pole exploration in her possession.
"Dr. Cook has by no means aban
doned his intention to prove con
clusively, despite the verdict of th»'
Copenhagen university, that he
reached the north pole," said his
brother, "and the detractors will
have a pretty bill to pay.
"The talk that Mrs. Cook is es
tranged from her husband and that
she contemplates a suit for separa
tion, with large alimony, is unwar
ranted. Mrs. Cook is standing by
her husband and will continue to do
so. Just now she is of immeasurable
comfort to him and together they are
planning and working for the future.
I have positive information that Dr.
Cook and wife will publicly appear
together and that then there will be
a change of feeling. It may be only
a few weeks and it may be months
before they appear publicly again.
That all depends on how long it re
quires Dr. Cook to fully substantiate
his claims."
Mr. Cook declined to say whether
Dr. and Mrs. Cook were in this coun
try or abroad.
No Blizzard Here.
While Saturday and Sunday were
blizzardy days all over the northwest
and In fact through the entire east.
Wenatchee escaped without any spe
cial Inconvenience. At Ephrata.
Quincy and Wilson Creek high winds
with drifting snow prevailed all day.
In the Mansfield and Waterville coun
try driving snow kept everybody in
door. The Sound suffered a , great
deal in the shipping, on account of
the blizzard. Yesterday morning the
thermometer was down to 4 below
zero. This morning it had moder
ated considerably and the thermome
ter registered 10 above in this city
Jarobson-Larson.
Miss Anna Jacobson and Mr. John
L. Larson, both of Wenatchee, were
united in marriage Saturday evening
at Cashmere. Rev. H. Robinson of the
Baptist church officiating. Mr. and
Mrs. Larson will make their home
in Wenatchee.
FROM PALACE TO
ALMSHOUSE
WIFE OF FORMER PRESIDENT
OF GUATEMALA KNOCKED FOR
ADMISSION TO A NEW ORLEANS
INSTITUTION ON NEW YEARS.
New Orlean, Jan. 3. —From a pal
act where she presided as the first
lady of the land to an almshouse—
such Is the fate which has overtaken
Senora Alagera Barrios, wife of a
former president of Guatemala.
With the almsot complete impair
ment of her vision, penniless and
without means to earn a living, Sen
ora Barrios knocked for admittance
at an almshouse here New Year's
day. Her husband, Jose Marie Reno
Barrios, was assassinated a short time •
after assuming the presidency. His
widow went to Europe. Her fortune
dissipated by mismanagement of
those in charge of it she asserts.
For several months she has lived ob
scurely In New Orleans.
A Skating Party,
A sleigh load of young people of
East Wenatchee spent New Year's day
on the Morris pond, skating. Among
the number were Grace, Fay and
Edna Smith, Carrie Gensinger, Ruby
Webb. Ed and Elmer Gensinger, Geo.
Prather and Finn Webb.
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