OCR Interpretation


The Wenatchee daily world. [volume] (Wenatchee, Wash.) 1905-1971, January 04, 1910, Image 1

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86072041/1910-01-04/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Wenatchee's Big Red Apple Daily
VOL. V. NO. 146.
HUMPHREY'S
SHIP i»
WW BILL INTRODUCED FOR THE
PURPOSE OF MAKING IT POS
SIBLE FOR AMERICAN VESSELS
SO EXIST.
Washington, Jan. 4. —Representa-
tive Humphrey of Washington intro
duced in the house a bill providing
lor a ship subsidy by the United
States government. The measure is
known to have the approval of Taft
and the administration and to be one
■pon which the proponents of the
skip subsidy concentrate their ef
forts. The Humphrey bill provides
an increase in pay to American ships
•nrrying mails to South America,
China. Japan, Philippine Islands and
Australia, bringing it up to $4 per
snile for an outward voyage for
tour miles or more. An increased
tonnage tax on transportation of
•eeanlc trade is provided and it is
proposed to admit foreign bill ships
to American register for the foreign
trade.
The author of the bill in an expla
nation said the proposition to in
crease the pay for carrying mails is
the most important feature of the
measure. The postmaster general is
authorized to pay second class ships
for carrying mails the same rate of
$4 per mile that is now paid first
class ships. Representative Ham
pbrey points out that the opponents
of the ship subsidy seem not to be
aware that we already have a sub
sidy for first class ships under the
law.
This law he claims "Is responsible
tor every American vessel on the At
lantic ocean. If repealed it would
cause the American flag to disappear
from tbe seas within sixty days."
Heard of Adrian Lots.
The Wenatchee Valley Land com
pany is in receipt of letters this week
from various parts of the earth re
garding the Adrian lots which this
company has recently placed on the
market. One letter this morning came
from Lob Angeles and another one
came from Florida and other letters
came from different sections of the
world. This indicates something of
the advertising ability of the Daily
World, as these lots have been ad
vertised extensively in this paper.
Four Dead From Eating Canned Fruit
Sawtelle. Cal., Jan. 4. —Four are
dead and six are dangerously ill from
ptomaine poison in canned pears eat
en Sunday at the home of Mrs. D. G.
Valdez. The dead are Mrs. A. Fer
nandez, baby daughter, Isabelle Fer
nandez, Mrs. D. G. Valdez. Frank
Garcia, a young lad.
RUNNING BYMDDLE
OF MONTH
mmAT light & power com-
PANY EXPECTS BIG PLANT
WILL RE IN READINESS BY
JANUARY 15.
The Entiat Light & Power com
pany plant on tho Entia*; is expected
to be in readiness for business about
The middle of January. The manage
ment had expected to have it running
by January I, but owing to tbe
strikes, which delayed the machinery.
and to the floods in the Entiat river,
which tore out a portion of the in
take, the work has been delayed. En-
gineer Weiland this morning stated
that the machinery will all be ln
stalled in a few days and it is hoped
that by the middle of the month the
machinery can be tested out and act
ive operations commenced. The work
at this end of the line has all been
ecaipleted and as soon as the machin
ery can be started at the power plant,
power and lighting can be delivered
in this city.
Mr. and Mrs. Dunn, formerly of
Wenatchee but now living In Seattle,
visited with old friends and neighbors
on Western avenue during the holi
day*. Mr, Dunn Is now foreman of a
terse sfcoe factory in Seattle.
INTERFERES WITH
NAVIGATION
BOAT SERVICE SUSPENDS BUSI
NESS TODAY FOR A TIME, OW
ING TO THE ICE IN THE COL
UMBIA RIVER.
For several days the ice in the
Columbia river has seriously inter
fered with navigation. Yesterday
the boat did not leave until late and
had to be chopped out of the ice.
The conditions were even worse this
morning and it is expected that to
day will end the boat service for a
time. For several years past the
boats have had to discontinue the
service during the winter months,
owing to the fact that the ice freezes
solid at all of the landings.
The Eagle Livery company will
put on stage service, carrying the
mails and passengers between We
natchee and Brewster. The stage
will leave here between 6 and 7
o'clock each morning.
SALE OF TOGGERY
FALLS THROUGH
INABILITY TO SECURE LEASE
CAUSE OF J. W. JOYCE ABAN
DONING PURCHASE — TUPPER
WILL ERECT STORE BUILDING.
E. M. Tupper, proprietor of the
Toggery, received a telegram last
night from his agent in Chicago stat
ing that J. W. Joyce refuses to com
plete his purchase of the Toggery
and that the option money had been
forfeited. Mr. Tupper was not much
surprised at the news. Several daysj
ago he learned that Mr. Joyce had
been unsuccessful in his efforts to
secure a satisfactory lease for the
room now being used in the Olympia
building.
When seen by the World reporter
this morning Mr. Tupper told a little
of his plans for the future. He stat
ed his purpose to erect a modern store
building on the site recently vacated
by the Owl drug store. Plans are
now being perfected for a modern two
story structure 120 feet deep. How
ever, the Toggery will not be moved
to the new location until compelled
to abandon its present stand.
Cashmere Masons Install Officers.
Cashmere, Jan. 4. —Mission lodge,
No. 158, F. and A. M., installed the
following officers Friday night, John
McDougal acting as installing officer-
W. B. Paton, W. M.; Fred Pommer,
S. W.; J. M. Francisco, J. W.; W.
A. Leddell, secretary; Frank G. Pal
mer, treasurer.
Officers were installed Saturday
night by Mission lodge No. 208, I. O.
O. F.. as follows: W. B. Phelps. N.
G.; J. L. Weythman. V. G.; A. H.
Mohler, R. S.; H. A. Smith, F. S.; E.
F. Stowell, treasurer; E. E. Stowell,
W. R. McManus. D. F. Flisher. trus
tees.
The scholars of the East Wenatchee
school have recently purchased a new
organ aud appointed Fay Smith as
music leader and organist.
EXPOWTILI
COMING
CITY OF THE GOLDEN GATE
LAUNCHES GREAT PROJECT
INTERNATIONAL IN SCOPE—
DATE NOT ANNOUNCED.
The public can begin to save up
and plan for a trip to San Francis
co now, for an exposition will be held
there soon to celebrate the opening
of the Panama canal. San Francisco
is still remembered for its famous
Midwinter fair, back in 1894, that
satisfied all who went. No vestige
remains in San Francisco now of the
great disaster that occurred there a
couple of years ago. The city has
been rebuilt on a grander scale than
ever before and the coming exposi
tion will doubtless go down in his
tory as one of the greatest that have
figured in the world's great fairs
since the Centennial.
WENATCHEE WASHINGTON. TUESDAY. JANUARY 4, 1910.
LEGAL BUSINESS ON
INCREASE
FORTY-POUR CASES FILED IN
I
THE SUPERIOR COURT IiAST
YEAR, ISS CIVIL CASKS AND
«4 PROBATE.
AH legal business of Chelan county
showed an increase during 1909 over
that of 1908. This is due in part
to the fact that Chelan county had a
judge here all the time and to the
further fact that the county is rapid
ly increasing in population, necessi
tating more legal business. During
the year 1909 there were 165 civil
cases filed as against 134 for the pre
ceding year; 64 probate cases as
against 60, and 44 criminal casfs to
30 for the year 1908. The legal ousi
ness whs on the increase but the legis
lative enactment of last winter,
whereby medical examination was
necessary before a license could be
issued, played havoc with the mar
riage license business in this county.
There were but 145 licenses filed for
last year to 149 the preceding year.
County Clerk Campbell has com
piled the statement of the legal busi-,
ness of Chelan county for the past
ten years. This makes interesting
reading and shows somewhat the
changes in the business of the county
as it was from 1900 to that of 1909.
The statement is as follows:
Cases Filed.
Year. Civil. Probate. Criminal
1900 28 16 4
1901 40 9 7
1902 48 27 9
1903 66 31 19
1904 71 38 27
1905 112 28 18
1906 69 51 24
1907 131 48 27
1908 134 60 30
1909 165 64 44
MaiTiage Certificates Recorded.
1900 29
1901 50
1902 71
1903 81
1904 88
1905 90
1906 '. 105
1907 109
1908 149
1909 145
1000 Important Year for Rig Rend.
Waterville, Jan. 4.—The year just
closed has been the most important
in the development of this portion
of the Big Bend country since its
settlement in 1883. The large crop
of wheat harvested, together with a
record price, has brought the ranch
es to a cash basis. Construction of
the Waterville branch from Columbia
River to Mansfield has been of un
told benefit to the wheat grower.
Where it formerly took four or six
horses one and two days to get a
load of grain to market, now he can
get out one and two loads each day
and with a less number of horses.
This has thrown many horses on
the market, lowering the price.
Waterville is now on the verge of
a building boom. The Douglas Coun
ty bank has prepared and adopted
plans for erection of a brick block
on the corner west from its pres
ent location. The Odd Fellows'
lodge will put up a brick structure
adjoining its present building. This
will contain two large stores on the
ground floor and lodge rooms above.
The Waterville Hardware company is
planning a brick building on a cor
ner lot. Several other brick busi
ness buildings are contemplated.
Statistics relative to necessity for
a government building here have
been requested. A bill introduced
in the senate appropriates $50,000
for that purpose. The business of
the land office exceeds $300,000 each
year and the postoffice $5,000.
Would Raise the Maine.
Washington, Jan. 4. —President
Taft is heartily in favor of the plan
to raise battleship Maine from
the bottom of Havana harbor. He
has informed Representative Lord of
Michigan that he desired to see the
latter's bill, appropriating money for
that purpose, enacted into law.
Bought Orondo Residence.
J. H. McGohan yesterday purchased
the H. E. Motteler residence on Oron
do avenue, paying for it $3,200. This
was bought as an investment by Mr.
McGohan. The house contains seven
rooms and has a 75 foot frontage.
Aeronaut Killed in France.
Bordeaux, Jan. 4.—Leon De La
Crauge, the noted French aeronaut,
was killed while making a flight here
today.
Member of the Associated Press
$30,000,000
FOR RECLA
MATION
JKESIDENT TAFT WILL URGE
THT IN HIS SPECIAL MESSAGE
WHICH WILL BE SENT TO CON
GUESS NEXT MONDAY.
Washington, Jan. 4.—ln his spe
cial message on conservation which
President Taft will send to congress
Monday a loan of $20,000,000 dollars
to complete the existing reclamation
projects will be suggested. Western
senators who have visited Taft dur
ing the last few days have been given
to understand that such a loan will
be recommended. The loan will'
probably be ploated in short term
bonds or certificates of indebtedness.
Borah ol Idaho is the outhor of the
bill for the $30,000,000 bond issue
is opposed to the issue of certificates.
LOCAliOuiri
Tip
PROMINENT APPLE GROWERS
INTERESTED IN TACOMA PROP
ERTY AND BUY HEAVILY IN
TACOMA CENTER ADDITION.

Tacoma, Wash., Jan. 4. —W. H.
Hall returned last night from We
natchee, where he has been inter
esting a syndicate of winter apple
millionaires in Tacoma tidelands,
who have taken a block in the popu
lar Tacoma Center addition.
Among the buyers la J. H. Ferry
man, a prominent coal dealer; B. S.
Crooks, purchasing agent for the
construction company that is build
ing the Great Northern branch up
the Okanogan river; A. A. Piper,
agent of the Groat Northern; B.
Walter Jones, secretary of the Colum
bia River Steamboat company; Roy
E. Thayer, assistant secretary of the
company; J. J. Griggs, manager of
the Columbia River Steamboat com
pany.
The Tacoma Center addition is in
the garden addition, but its days of
gardening are about over, if the
trend of development.continues that
way. A valley gardener a few days
ago made the remark that he would
have to hunt up a new place. On
a five-acre tract which he bought
eight years ago he had made/ clear
of expenses and the keeping of his
family, an average of $2,000 a year;
but couldn't afford to garden on $4.-
--000 an acre land.
Tacoma people have been good
customers of the irrigated lands of
the east of the mountains, and now
some of the far-seeing ones over on
that side are among the heaviest
buyers in Tacoma tidelands, next to
the eastern buyers, who come here
with a tip from the railroad inter
ests.
Just to show what they are doing
with their apples in Wenatchee Mr.
Hall brought over some samples pick
ed off from the stand of R. F. Lillis,
the leading fruit dealer of the apple
metropolis, which sell for two for a
quarter. The same apples bring $6 a
box. The kind brought over by Mr.
Hall are the Delicious, and look It.
The Wenatchee syndicate is the
third of the eastern Washington dis
tricts to buy in the Center addPion.
Double Suicide in Akron.
Akron, 0.. Jan. 4.—Charles
Schmidt, alias Mike Jordan, last
night murdered Miss Teresa Barn
hart and while the police were search
ing for him today he killed himself
in front of the Barnhart home.
G. B. Parks, recently of the Lamb-
Davis Lumber company, and family
will leave tonight for their future
home at Pullman. Mr. Parks goes
there to take charge of tbe Potlatch
Lumber company yard. He had con
templated going to North Yakima
but received a better offer to take
charge of the business at Pullman.
Mr. and Mrs. Alyn Colwell enter
tained Mr. and Mrs. Milton Marr and
family at dinner New Year's day, at
their home on D street.
NEW MANUFACTUR
ING KERN
LOCAL MEN HAVE PUMP THAT
WORKS AT ALL STAGES OF
WATER —NO ECONOMY IN
CENTRIFUGAL PUMPS.
The long looked for Columbia rivet
pump has finally come. Ever sinc#
agriculture was first begun on th<:
Columbia the settlers have talkeC
about a pump that could be made t >
work at all stages of water whi i
fixed in a permanent place. The rl9e
and fall of the Columbia has too
much range for any ordinary pump
to be of much use without moving it
a few times during the season. To
obviate this difficulty F. J. Clifford,
formerly with the International Har
vester company, designel a power
head that seems to meet every re
quirement that can be thought of.
Mr. Clifford has interested some of
Wenatchee's prominent men who
have formed a stock company to
make and sell the pump. A. B. Court
way, J. F. Webber, O. M. Thomason
and J. B. Clifford are president, vice
president, secretary and general man
ager, respectively. An exhibition
pump is already set up and ready for
inspection at Woodruff's machine
shop. Mr. Clifford decided not to
make his demonstration in the river
at this time of the year, as interested
persons would hardly care to go down
there during the winter weather, and
the pump can be shown and worked
to just as good advantage on Wenat
chee avenue.
The pump is operated on the
straight drive principle, and takes its
name, the Strait Drive pump, from
that source. All waste of power is
eliminated and the Strait Drive is
guaranteed to do twice the work of a
centrifugal pump with the same pow
er. It is a direct drive arrangement,
connecting with the power by means
of a very simple and effective clutch
that represents only ten per cent of
the total cost, or one-half as much as
double pulleys and belting would
amount to.
The working head is a self-con
tained arrangement that is swung on
trunnions made fast to a permanent
foundation. It will operate at any
angle without loss of power. A pis
ton rod connects it with the pump
that can be permanently located
anywhere in a straight line below.
The pump will work under water,
while the head is always in the dry
and easily accessible. The principle
of transmission is neither centrifugal
or reciprocal. It is a direct drive and
pinion. The pinion always turns one
way and the rack is an integral part
of the piston. When the rack has
gone dowa as far as it will it pre
sents its reverse side to the pinion
and starts up, while there is no break
in the motion. The whole device is
simplicity itself and can not get out
of order any more than could a
hydraulic ram.
Later in the season the Strait Drive
Pump company will install three
pumps embracing the three pumping
principles of centrifugal, reciprocal
and straight drive action down on
the river close to town and will dem
onstrate by actual test that the
straight drive will lift as much water
to a height of 100 feet with four
horsepower as a centrifugal will lift
with eight horsepower.
A five horsepower pump, costing
$225, not Including piping, will be
sufficient to irrigate a ten-acre tract
of land 200 feet above the river.
J. O. Adams of Brewster and J. E.
Steiner of Pateros will use strait
drive pumps this coming season and
twenty orders have been taken for
deliveries in Moses coulee. The
Strait Drive Pump company will soon
begin the making of their pumps in
Wenatchee on a large scale, adding
materially to Wenatchee's present
pay roill, which exceeds $20,000 a
month now.
New Year's Dinner.
Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Grant were
hosts at a turkey dinner last Sun
day. The guests were Mr. and Mrs.
Aubrey Grant, Mr. and Mrs. Homer
Grant and son, Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd
Fanner, Miss Welsh. Miss Sylvia
Grant, Bruce Hastings and Mr. Gray.
School of Horticulture.
Prof, Trumble's school of horticul
ture will begin on Monday, the 17th
of this month, and continue on Wed
nesdays, Fridays and Mondays, until
tho course of 18 has been run.
Mrs. Carl Ray is visiting with Mr.
and Mrs. Willrs Hoyle this week, on
Western avenue.
Wenatchee's Big Red Apple Daily
IRI AT BOAT
LANDING
WINTER SPORTS CLOSE TO TOWN
—FOUR INCHES ICE AT THE
BOAT LANDING AND RINK
WILL SOON BE READY.
Men are working near the boat
landing today preparing a rink on
the 4-inch ice that has formed there.
A. J. Ritz of the Gem theatre has
secured all necessary permits and
will put up a large tent at once, in
stall elecric lights, and let both privi
leges for refreshments. Mr. Ritz
will also arrange for music and al
ready has the promise of a number ot
parties that will be on hand as soon
as the rink is ready. He is an expert
skater and instructor himself, and
the chance will be ideal for those
who want to learn.
Mr. Ritz is not ready yet to make
a formal announcement but that will
appear in a few days.
RECEIVED 1934.50
vi popx
COLLECTIONS FOR THE YEAR
1909 AS RECEIVED BY THE
CITY CLERK SHOWS COST OF
COLLECTIONS TO FE SMALL.
"A Taxpayer" had an article in
the Daily World of last night which
was somewhat misleading, inasmuch
as he stated that after the city paid
other officers received commissions
from this that there was very little
leit-t>f the original $2 poll tax. The
report of City Clerk Sumner shows
that the city share of the poll tox
amounted to $934.50 for last year.
In securing this collection the city
contracted to pay a fee as follows:
"For the first $500 the commission
shall be $40; for the next $250 the
commission shall be $35; for the
next $250 the commission shall be
$50; or in the event the said amount
be over and above the first $750 col
lected shall not aggregate $250, the
collector shall receive as commission
and full satisfaction of all service
rendered 2 0 per cent of such amount
of the said $750."
The poll tax collector's fees for the
amount collected amounted to
per cent of the tax collections and
that was the entire cost. There were
no fees to anybody else and the city
received $934.50 which was used by
the street department in the caring
of the city streets.
This statement is made for the in
foramtlon of the contributor of the
article in last night's World regard
ing the subject of poll tax. This,
like a great many other matters that
is handled by tbe city administration
is not understood by the public and
consequently might be the subject
of criticism.
Orondo Avenue Rowling Parlor.
H. C. Miller tomorrow will open up
the Orondo Avenue Billiard Parlor in
the building recently occupied by the
Palmetto. Mr. Miller has a complete
lot of new fixtures and expects to
make his place a very popular resort.
Washington Weather.
Washington—Fair tonight and
Wednesday, cold.
MAYIEIiTEAM
LEAGUE
SIX APPLICATIONS NOW IN FOR
PLACE IN NORTHWESTERN
BALL LEAGUE MADE VACANT
BY PORTLAND'S WITHDRAWAL
Seattle, Jan. 4. —For a franchise
in the Northwestern Baseball league
made vacant by the withdrawal of
Portland applications have been re
ceived from Everett, Bellingbam,
North Yakima, Walla Walla, Butte
and Helena. There is talk of increas
ing the league from six to eight in
this event and three new cities may
be taken in. The plan is much in
favor to give the frantulse to Bel
lingham with tbe privilege of play
ing srames in Everett.
5c PER COPY
Mini
Bill II
DUCED
REPRESENTATIV B MANN FATH
ER OF BILL WHICH PROPOSE*
TO KEGULATE CARRYING BUS
INESS OF RAILROADS.
Washington, Jan. 4.—A bill mak
ing sweeping changes in the inter
state commerce law for the regulation
of railroads was introduced today in
the house of representatives by Rep
resentative Mann of Illinois, chair
man of the committee on interstate
and foreign commerce. The bill is
not in accord with the one proposed
by the committee acting under the
direction of President Taft and known
as- the "administration railroad bill."
It was prepared by Mann during
the summer vacation of congress. The
measure does not provide for a spe
cial court to hear the interstate com
merce cases. As has been reported
this would be the form of legislation
on this subject that Taft recom
mends.
It provides, however, for the crea
tion in the department of commerce
and labor of a bureau to be known
as the bureau of transportation.
where the shipper may file a com
plaint against the railroad. If the
complaint is a just one it will he re
ferred to the attorney general and
upon his further investigation and
recomendation the complaint will be
taken up by the interstate commerce
commission and prosecution will be
carried on at tbe expense of the gov
ernment. The shipper, if he prefers,
may file the complaint direct with
the commission and prosecute the
same at his own expense. The bill
makes it the duty of the common car
rieds to establish just and reasonable
classifications and regulations and
authorizes the interstate commerce
commission to prescribe what they
• shall do.
The long and short hauls clause of
the interstate commerce act would be
amended to provide that the charge
for the short haul in no case shoul.l
be greater than the charge for the
long haul and charge for through rate
shall be no greater than the aggre
gate of the local rates. False or
padded claims for damages by ship
pers are prohibited as are rebates
The powers of the commission art?
much enlarged in several directions
The bill requires stock to be sold
for not less than par and bonds for
not less than the reasonable market
value and also makes it unlawful for
any railroad to acquire by purchase,
lease or otherwise ownership in any
connecting line and forbids any form
of ownership to acquire control of
two competing lines of transportation
unless permitted by the interstate
commerce commission.
NEW OFHCERS WILL
BE INDUCTED
POUR NEW COUNCILMEN TAKE
OATH OF OFFICE TONIGHT—
MET LAST NIGHT TO AGREE
ON APPOINTIVE OFFICERS.
The old council will meet this eve
ning, the roll will be called and short
ly therafter will adjourn sine die.
The newly elected councllmen and
mayor will then be sworn in and the
city governing board will then start
off on the business of the year. The
council will consist of the three hold
overs, Terry Ross, Howard Thomas
and J. H. McGohan, and the newly
elected members are Ed. S. Russell.
George Begg, W. G. Stacy and C. B
Halbert. The retiriug members are
G. M. Russi, L. V. Wells, J. E. Porter
and P. P. Holcomb.
it is expected that Mayor Gellatly
will tonight announce his committee
assignments for the coming year.
Last night the newly elected members
and the holdovers met witb Mayor
Gellatly and discussed tbe matter of
appointive officers for the coming
year. While nothing has been given
out positively yet it is generally con
sidered that there will be no change
in the personnel of the appointive of
ficers as they now stand.

xml | txt