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The West Virginian. [volume] (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1914-1974, February 21, 1917, Image 5

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?????m?^W?
t THE DAILY ||'
* SHORT STORY
Benita's Choice.
i Copyright, 1#17, by the McClura i
Newspaper Syndicate.)
BENITA lingered most provokingly i
and deliberately on the road |
home. There are times when!
f home seoms the very last desirable;
place Id the world to go, and this was!
one of them. First of all, Grandmother
Rollins had told her at least seven
times that day to count her blessings
one by one, and she'd be surprised to
see what the Lord bad done.
From which It may be gathered
that Benlta was on one of her rebellious
streaks. And, again, Tom had
demanded to know, again and again,
what in tunket ailed her, anyhow. Tom
was fourteen and without understand-)
lng. Then, her mother had said:
"Benlta, child, who docs all you?|
You act bowitchcd. You drop everything
you touch, and you haven't a
decent word for anyobdy In the family."
Why should she havo? thought Benlta
haughtily. Weren't they all against ;
her? Wasn't it bad enough to havo a;
name tacked on one like Benlta Duseu-,
berry, coupled with an artistic tem-j
peramcnt. and then havo a family without
any of the finer instincts at all?
' Somehow she had never noticed the
lack of those finer instincts until Jessica
and her brother had come to stop
awhile at the Threo Pines,
i When the Dusenberry fortunes had j
first fluctuated, they had taken the j
ramming om country nome. anil turned
it into a sort of -wayside inn, catching
the automobile traffic in the summer
time, and seeking select paying
guests in cold weather. In this class
belonged Jessica and her brother.
Big- From the first day of their arrival,
; Benita had realized the gulf that sep? /
arated her from the rest of the family,
V /i and what it meant to find one's proper
p equation. That was Jessica's own
term for it?"the proper equation"?
|U and it meant being with people of your
K own kind who understood you. Bent- '
v ta had carried up some clean towels
1' and a fresh cake of the oval pink soup
reserved for guests, and stood dazzled
and charged at the sight of Jessica
Unpacking her trunk.
"I make most of them myself." said 1
Jessica, airily, "when I am in the mood. It
isn't so much the finish one puts
on gowns. It's all in the lines and the
effect"
& Wallace, the tall, fair musician
brother, seemed to belong to Jessica
quite as naturally as the artistic
gowns. He was dreamy and aloof.
He took long, solitary walks through
the woods and roads, and came back
to improvise marvelous airs on his
violin. When one spoke to liirn he
& smiled and bowed, and looked wonderR'
folly intelligent, Mrs. Dusenberry said,
quite as if she bad been speaking of
Ifraz. the biz sheen doz. Once when
' Uenlttt had been hurrying over from
a neighbor's with a borrowed meat
grinder, eho had met him, standing enraptured,
gazing at something In his
band.
"Little girl," he had said, "con you
tell me the name of this?"
"Adder's tongue," answered Benlta,
pnsblng back her hair, and trying to
took as grown-up as she could. She
thought everybody knew what plain,
r.' everyday adder's tongue looked like.
She told Len about It when he came
up to help Tom with the wood-cutting,
/'lien was twenty and nearly six feet
ML He looked fearfully hearty beside
Wallace. She only thought of
i. .him as Wallace. To his face she called
Him Mr. Farley, of course, but when
I X CONFESSIONS
"You can Imagine my horror. Mar- i
H gie, when Earnest Lawton swore at 1
me. I had not learned when a wo- i
man goes out to work with men, she 1
H / can be sure she will encounter men :
H' who will one minute treat her as a
woman purely on sex lines and the ,
? next moment throw off all politeness ;
and decency and talk to her and tight J
her with a man's vocabulary and a <
man's weapons.
I "Elach moment the scales were dropping
from my eyes In regard to Earn- '
est Lawton. I Baw how coarse, how
l absolutely selllah he was. To be even '
on the stage with him was torture,
but I did not want to give up my part.
X had gone In debt tor my gowns and ]
was slowly paying up. It would take '
at least four weeks more to do this. '
&' "Besides, each night that I actea '
my role 1 found I was becoming Burer
of myself. I no longer poured out my
' soul to Earnest Lawton but 1 did pour
out what little talent I had to make 1
good with my audiences. '
> ' * "1 confess I was worried when I 1
- thought of what Earnest was going to
do with the man who wrote the newspaper
story about me. I worried a litwy
tie about the critic too, for he seemed
to have an uncanny understanding of
the ease. I wondered If everyone could
tell I had been In love with Earnest
Lawton.
"I spoke to Alma Huntington about
It when she came to dinner with me
the next day. 'Don't worry, my dear,"
she advised, 'Tom Perry Is one of the
i most Influential critics in town and
he prides himself on his expert psychology
as well as saying lust what he
pleases. Earnest Lawton wlU never
&' tackle him. tar he knows he will get
the worst of It In tho end. Tho storm
.n ?* - -
_ wo turn cuum wiue auuut mm wouia
make good reading.
'"It ipust make It rather hard lor
rou though, It you care tor Lawton,
I > and harder It you don't. I can't sea
'.* htm myself, either as a man or an
rigs actor, but he has great voguo with the
poor little rich girls who have nothing
else to do but fall in love with actors,
lancers and other more or less epiccno
specimens of humanity.'
?.:'Alma's Interview with me was
j.rp great, Margie. She said: 'Miss Paula
N'ewtou looks like a professional beau?L
far, carries herself like a society girl.
Ireifssttj l|ke a Lucille model and acts
like a human being.'
| .-lite did not nay she was in love
i
'AGE I
CHOICE FOR EASTER
THE ONE PIE
.UvAL STYLES OF
By BETTY BROWN
NEW YORK. Feb. 21.?Which shall
t be, a one-piece dross or a coat suit?
rhla Is a question which grandmothers
ts well as debutantes will have to de:ide
when selecting a costume for the
Saster parade.
It's a hard choice. But the onepiece
threatens to prove the best bet
>o far as general popularity Is conlernod.
It has the charm of novelty
tnd Its effect Is usually much more
luvenilo than that of a skirt and coat.
However, tho one Indlspensablo feaure
of the average woman's wardrobe
s the tailored street suit. The generous
fullness of spring coats, and
heir collars and cuffs of remarkable
dze suggest tho matronly rather than
ho debutante type of figure.
The one-piece dress of today's 11iho
stopped In the hall to listen to the
violin playing, she would say, with a
Ittle sigh of rapture, "Wallace! Wallace!"?Impersonally,
of course.
Len had laughed and said he looked
'sort of peaked." Genius should look
athereal, Benita had thought. Then
the climax came. Jessica told her
that she, Benita. was the inspiration
'or Wallace's latest improvislon, "The
Maid o' the Pines."
"I hope he will be able to capture it
ind write it down. It has all the wailing
of the wind in the pines in it. and
the mystical yearnings of the unfledgi
OF A WIFE "TT|
with her art or the star, and probably
because she evinced great interest in
me and my work on a newspaper 1
thought her the nicest girl I had evet
met off or on the stage.
" 'Earnest Lawton is to be congrat
alated on being a good picker, as Miss
Newton told me he engaged her be
:ause he thought she looked the part
She not only lookB but acts it.'
"'Oh, Alma,' I said?for I had al
ready begun to call her Alma, Margie
? you ought not to have written that
Vfr TJkurfnw will hota wwo
aver.'
" 'Then he does hate you. I huvc
lot been able to decide before whether
lie was desperately In love with you or
whether he hated you most generous
iy.
"After that, Margie, I told her the
whole story.
"She listened without comment nn
ill I had finished and then she clasp'
3d my hand across the table?we were
Saving dinner served In my room.
" "Wo all have to pass through fire
I DID Vol) WANT ME, ] ]
1 I Al
"OR W(
IRADE LIES BETWEEN ;
CE AND THE COAT SUIT! I
p
e
*
l\ i
STREET COSTL'MES j,
lustration shows an unusually artistic
arrangement of pointed skirt gores
which extend above the girdle. These
points cut the belt line and thus diminish
the apparent breadth of the figure.
Black facings and stitcblngs are
employed to emphasize the main features
of this excellent design.
The Japanese parasol was resurrected
a year ago by a ccrsatilo designer
and It has proved the rage on
Florida beaches this spring. It will
probably reach, this summer, that
stago of fashion known as "popular."
The coat suit Is a monotone In color
except for its very conspicuous buttons.
The placing of the buttons on
the Inside Instead of tho outside seam
of the cuff is unique. The cap, a
curious vlsored adaptation of the east
Indian tnrban. Is made of the material
used for the collar facing.
I ed soul," she explained.
. Benlta was glad he bad put it Into
words. After the dishes were finished
1 she threw a cape around her and went
out under the three tall pine trees in
. front of the house, to catch the mystical
yearning herself. But Len came
along from tho barn, and stayed talking
to her about the concert at the town
i; hall next week, until her mother called
her in. Also, he reminded hor that
. they were engaged. Benita had put
the thought from her for Bcveral
.! weeks.
"I guess by Easter I'll have things
Paula,' she said. 'Some time I'll tell
you of my experience. Like you, I j
fear I hnve to bless fate, instead of I
my own strength, and I did not have
your great excuse. I knew I was not c
in love. However, the result is the I
same. I know Just what temptations t
! a girl must resist and consequently
t I judge no one. Time, place, clr- t
cumstances play such great roles in
our lives.' 1
" 'Yes, Alma,' I said. 'I have been t
i wondering the last few days whether <
' if Ruth had not come Into my room 5
lust when she did, I would have open- j
ed that fateful door.' ^
i " 'I don't think you would, Paula,'
. Bald Alma with conviction.
I " 'Why are you so sure?' I asked.
" 'Well, of course, I can only judge t
! by my own experience.' u
"'But, Alma, you did not think you \
were In love?' {
" 'No, dear, but I honestly thought
i I had to choose between selling my
soul and starvation.'
" 'And you chose starvation?*
" 'I dont know whetlrer I did or not, '
II Paula?sometimes I think it was the e
| man who decided he did not want to v
, I buy my soul.'" (
DOINGS OF THE E
WANTED To "TfeU-VoO, HT [| * [
AISS OVERDRAPEJoLET 1| j |]ll
j. KNOW IF WILBUR In1, IF Xl
TURbs Vol) while Vod i ^A1"
ie
===========s=s==============
3MEN ,
ettled so we can be married. I want
o put a new 'ell' on the kitchen and
ilaster two rooms upstairs, and get a
lorch on the front of the bouse. Motlir
says shell spend part of the time rrtth
8yd and pert with Rose till we
:et settled down. Think your mother
an spare you by then, Benlta?"
"I don't know." Benita had said
aguely. "I think eighteen is plenty
Id enough to get married, and 1 won't
e seventeen till next month."
Now had come this final day. Mrs.
irewster. Len s mother. Had sent tor
ier to help with some quilting.
"Too might as well, 'cause half of
hem are for you and Len," she said I
heorfully. And all the afternoon Ben-'
la had quilted and listened to long ac- j
ounts of this piece and that piece.1
nd whose dresses they bad come'
rom back In the annals of Len's fam-1
ly. It was specially aggravating, slnco
Wallace had been playing all the mornng
In the front room "The Maid o' the
Ines" and various melodies warrantd
to mako one's heart hungry for art
nd inspiration, not patchwork quilts,
ill the way up tho hill rood Bcnlts told
lerself she would break her engagement
to Ven tbe next day, and find
,'hat Jessica called the patlt to highci
appiness. And then over tho edge
f tho woods, Just where the eastern
ky was darkening at nightfall she saw
rising column of smoke, followed by
spurt of yellow flame. It came from
he house, she felt sure, as she broke
nto a quick, light run along the froz11
road. She wondered If Lcn and
"oni would lie back from the wood lot
>y now. Mavbo her mother and the
Ittle children were In tho bouse alone,
lut then there were Jessica and her
rother. They would help. At the
urn of the road she saw the fire cirling
up about the old house, with the
hrec pines standing in sharp slllouetto
against the light. A sharp
tone in the road made her stumble and
all but sbe was on her feet in a moment
and down the hill.
Then, just as sbo reached the gate,
he saw Wallace. He went on the stone
rail with bis violin, quite like Nero,
lonlta thought later, drawing sweet
trains from his violin, and Jessica
vas beside him with three suit cases
>acked safely.
"Where is mother?" Benlta exclaimd.
"Ob, the young man who cuts wood
s fighting the fire in the kitchen," Jesica
told her happily. "Isn't it an inplrlng
sight? Wallace has a theme aleady,
'Gloaming Embers.' Do you like
t, Benita?"
But Benita liad fled around by the
iack way. Her mother was helping L
'om draw buckets of water from the 1
rell, and soaking blankets and old bur- j _
ap socks to pasB up to Len on tho "ell" oof.
The twins and Dot stood at a ?
afe distance, watching, and Bentta T
oined tho bucket brigade with a curi- I
iur rush of enthusiasm. The dear, l_
ilessed old house?It was worth fight- >
ng for, and wasn't it splendid to feel
mesclf a part of the family, all helpng
to save it? Several times when fo
he flames and smoke hid Leu from fo
lght, she found herself praying for pf
he safety of her'Len, brave and fear- .
ess. And through It all, she wanted
o laugh hysterically as the strains of
he violin straggled to her from the pc
;arden wall where Wallace was play- J8
ng the nocturne. "Gloaming Embers!" '8
It was nearly 9 before the last b
molderlng wag extinguished. The fire
lad been confined to the "L," thanks
0 Len. and ho stood eyeing the result h,
iroudly. smoky and begrimed, his ,
irms bare. Benlta was beside him.
)ver the pines rose the full moon. The h
dr was keen and sharp with frost.
..en glanced down at tho slim figure
lesidc him. and smiled, slipping one (
irm around Benlta's waist. nl
"Hello, dear," he said. "Wo beat it, f
lidn't we?" ^
"You were splendid," Benita an- in
wered, solemnly, "just splendid, Len. pc
The whole house would have gone it
ou had not fought the way you did. of
"m awfully proud of you." di
"Even if 1 can't fiddle?" Len's blue fr
>yea were twinkling. Ho had not et
>een altogether blind to current events
he past few weeks. oi
Benita snuggled closer to him with or
1 little sigh of relief. fo
"I don't mind if?if it is at Easter, Pi
-en," she whispered. "I had a lovely
Ime quilting today, and your moth- w
>r's awfully dear to me. I don't like j fo
lonn music, anynow, not at tires. "
And upstairs In tbe front room Wal- cc
ace wondered "what the young man W(
vho cut wood was laughing at. wi
Hard Taak. '
"You can't always tell the slae of at
l man's head because he wears a six w
ind a quarter hat," remarks the Nash- ea
ille Banner. Not unless you have a nc
tood light and a microscope, anyway. "
re
. AS
Worthy Prayer.
Prayer for worldly goods is worse
han fruitless, but prayer for strength 3?
f soul is that passion of the soul
rhich catches the gift It seeds.? an
Jcorge Meredith. pa
IUFFS? (WILBUR DIDN'T I
p-s-s-sr- wh l l'ffl
COME IN ? | WANT #]
To ASKVoUSOWt-f-????rl
P7 -miMg [" " ? VCS, BUT I j
J/? Noo'U HAVET'O Hi
BE WICK
*1 ABOUT If ]/ W
ENING. FEBRUARY 21. 1P1
mo t
Have'
Qnvir
Wapiti
*For Day time we;
for all other occasic
Hats that will delig
See Our
Newest Frill
Sports Silk anc
$2.50 $
New Ge
For Day Time
Barrel Skirt St
$15.00 i
?
HEALTH HINTS]!?
'-*1"
> i)
Food Ik taken inlo the human body j r
r the purpose of supplying energy
r the movement of the body and its irts
and to furnish heat to keep the i
>dy warm.
All food 1b capable of being used as "
>dy fuel and by far the greater part
bo used. The standard of Hb value
the number of heat units It contains.
It too little fuel 1b taken inlo the
>dy an Insufficient number of heat
tits to operate It are received and It
Drks Inefficiently. If. on the other
md, too great ansamount of food Ib
ken the body becomes clogged and
orks Just as inefficiently as if it
id received too small an amount.
The most Important thing Is to re- I
ove promptly all the waste mateIs
remaining alter the food had
ven up its heat units. If too great
i amount of this waste stuff is allow- ,
1 to remain the fires of the body are
danger of being put out by these
itsonous materials.
Many people eat gTent quantities
1 food without realizing It. This is
le to the common delusion that candy c
ult, pop corn and other articles eat- .
i between meals "do not count."
Another common oversight is to n
terlook such things aB butter and d
earn, which may contain more actual ti
od value than all the rest of the meal v
it together. a
It is physical and not mental work y
bich uses up the greater part of our b
od. A robust man engaged in ac- s
ve exercises in the open air may a
immit eating indiscretions which
ould bo very harmful to the indoor p
Drkor. P
There is foundation for the com- s
.on impression that bratnwork or
ipenditure of mental energy cre-y a
es a special need for food. The brain v
orker often gains weight without ll
itlng very much. What he r.oally o:
leds is exercise to use up the food, d
he will not take exercise he'should e
duce his food even below the small
count on which he gains weight. h
J'
EALTH QUESTIONS ANSEWERED D
L. T.?"What remedy would you c
ggest for a severe attack of grip?"
If you are aching much, go to bed c
id stay until the aching stage has tl
,ssed. This is the remedy. sj
[NOW HE WAS BEING KI1
! I WAMTED TO SPEAK To Tp^
NoU ASOUT OUR ENtJAWMOir- New
I yJB ARB STUL EN<JA?BD r~ v/l
! ARBN'r VNBf r?? 1
1R? J
?
HE HQ]
JS4#oo<%L=
QjuaHity
?ou Seen the
\r? IVIIIIirn
lg 1T11111111
ar, for Evening and 5
ans. Distinctly Exclusi1
ht the wearer the long
Beautiful 1
Effects of Georgette,
i Voile.
5.00 $7.50
orgette E
: wear, made in the lat
yle, in all the New Spr
1519.75 $25.00
Convenience. <?pi
It 1* n convenience to make several 01
ledlum-slzed bags of cheesecloth for
uttlng vegetables in when Jbey have
een prepared and are t? be pnt hi tne
ffrigerator.
lie
| an)
MS! MOISTEN A s
CLOTH AND DRAW =
IT THROUGH HAIR,
am
T BECOMES BEAUTIFULLY SOFT, J '
WAVY, ABUNDANT AND he,
GLO88Y AT ONCE j ,v0
; est
1AVE YOUR HAIR! ALL DAND- I cat
RUFF GOES AND HAIR STOPS
COMING OUT 1
I PCI
Surely try a "Uanderine Hair j
'loansft'' if vnn wish 1 rr Immoi^Qinw! nan
ouble the beauty of your hair. Just an'
loisten a cloth with Danderine and ^
raw it carefully through your hair, nir
iking one small strand at a time; this
rill cleanse the hair of dust, dirt or _
ny excessive oil?In a few minutes ?
ou will be amazed. Yttar hair will ?
e wavy, fluffy and abundant and pos- MR
ess an Incomparable softness lustre nl
nd luxuriance.
Bosldcs beautifying the hair one aplicatlon
of Danderine dissolves every NC
article of dandruff; Invigorates the
calp stopping Itching and falling hair.
Danderine is to the hair what fresh
howers of rain and sunshine aro to' j
egctation. It goes right to the roots, ju
"ivlgorates and stcngthens them. Its a]y
xhilarating, stimulating and life-pro- >
ucing properties cause the hair to gy*
row long, strong and beautiful. tat
You can surely have pretty, soft. i00
istrous hair, and lots of it. If you will jrr
ist get a 25-cent bottle of Knowlton's c),]
anderlne from any drug store or toilet dn
ounter and try It as directed. jot
Save your hair! Keeping It'looking l0
harmins? ?nr1 hMtiHfiil Von will oov
lis was the best 25 cents you ever (.0,
[>ent. ! or
DDED)?BY ALLMAN.
lilt* VWntEM.PEAg, PO I
J BET ! YOD (HSisroHKeePiMtfJ
: APE I OOP BMCASEMCtJT f~p{
lU sec RET? r?ftu
555S53533555S5555aC3SH8*i
ery? | 1
>port wear, and
ve and Beautiful
season through.
I
Blouses 1
Crepe-de-Chine, 1
$10.00 . I
*
!
)resses I
;e Silkoutte and
'ing Shades. J1 -9
$29.75 ; | 1
i
ttmiFiili ' H
HEADACHE QUICKU I
V single trial will convince you. Re
ves headache in a Jiffy. Pleas air
1 easy to take. Contains no opiate:
narcotic drugs. Costs only 6c pet
cknge at all stores In city or couu
=A DELICATE CHILD 1
Made Strong By Our Vinel.
fayclteville, N. C. ? "My llttlt
tghter was in poor health, dellcau
J so weak it made us very uneasy
learu auoui vmoi and decided tc
It and tho results -were marvelous,
r appetite improved, ehe gained in
ight, and is now one of the health!
children in town. Mothers ot deli' e
children should try VinoL"? Mrs
rdon Josstip.r'iuol
contains beet and cod livei
Hones, Iron and manganese pep
lates and glycerophosphates whlcl
ke It a constitutional remedy which
atcs an appetite, aids digestlor
1 makes pure healthy blood. All
ldren love to take it. Crane's Drug
>re. Prescription Pharmacy, 'ManI
UNUSUAL COUGH REMEDY 1
IT A DROP OF OPIATES OR NAR 9
COTIC DRUGS IN OLD BLACK
JOE COUGH SYRUP
|
Tostcough remedies eontalaoplatei
some form or another. They par
zc the nerves. They are dangerous
s'ot ho with Old Black Joe Oougl
up. It goeH right down to the lrried
spot that Is causing the cough
tat ion. And not a drop ot opium
oroform or any kind ot nareptfc
g Is In It. Vou can give Old Black
Cough Syrup to a child as well as
an adult with perfect safety.
3very store sells Old Black Jo?
tgh Syrup. A.big bottle cost* only
cents.
BECAUSE/foU 5iU>< ' . JM
BON, IF IT wece MADE
ibuc, pEopte wouu)
INK I REALia WTWOBD
> MARRV SOO-[
\\ r p
fllM
...y , .^|

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