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The West Virginian. [volume] (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1914-1974, March 07, 1917, Image 5

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"'i'
A F
>|| THE DAILY
SHORT ST ORY
?tl
Mumps.
By 8U8AN E. CLAGETT.
{Copyright, 1917, by the McCltfre
Newspaper Syndicate.)
<(| CANNOT understand yonr rea*
I toning. 1 am not a child to fol*
low blindly where you would
lead. There must be some better argument
than any you've made yet before
I give up a purpose that means
to much to me."
The girl flared around upon him,
? toer eyes flashing; yet she spoke
quietly.
"It is useless, Dick. 1 have looked
forward to such a trip since I was a
Child of twelve. I never Imagined It 1
possibility, and I consider myself forMinatn
k. I? ?1 ? - >
buum.o vo uo iuuiuueu among ine gueats
Of the Neris. I know that it will bo a.
costly trip, but I can think of'no better
way of putting the money to use.
Of course I coulu in.est It und go cn
longing for the fleshpotr,, but so far,
life has been rather a bitter experience
and I would like to liavo this year
of travel to make up for it."
"If it weren't for the people you
are going with." ho Bald absently, looking
at her with a full appreciation ot
her personality. "They aro not your
sort, too newly rich?and vulgar."
"Well, my wealth is newly acquired,
too," she retorted, "yet 1 doubt
If you would apply that ugly worn to
ipe. My ten shares ot Bethlehem
have given me no fortune, but they
have added materially to an unexpected
and pleasant prospect. My original
investment - is safe. You have seen
to that, I am only going to use the
profit."
Dick's eyes twinkled, but he replica
gravely. "The monoy is, us you well
know, my last thought What trou
bles me Is that iu your new character
of an Independent woman you are slipping
away from me."
She faced him open eyed, then turned
abruptly toward the window. It was!
some minutes before she remarked irrelevantly:
1 have not told you, Dick, that I?
I?" she hesitated. Then the words
came with a rush.
"I have promised Perry Olcott to
marry him when I return."
Richard Grahame's face whitened
and he laughed a trifle unsteadily, but
the reply to this announcement wab
the unexpected one.
"I think not, Helen. I will prevent
that."
"How?" she asked curiously. To her
surprise she felt no resentment at this .
arbitrary statement of his Intention:
abe merely (elt a curiosity as to his j
methods.
He Ignored the question, apparently j
giving his mind (or the moment to
' something else.
"It seems to be the hour (or confidences,"
he said at last. "I have a
little one o( my own to make. I hope
it will please you. I have accepted)
Mrs. Warburton's Invitation. She was !
good enough to leave It open (or a'few !
days, and I have found that 1 can get'
away."
"A queer decision when you consld-!
er your attitude of mind toward tho t
newly rich," she replied, an edge 011
sarcasm in her voice. "I presume you
think you will have unusual advantages
for espionage on board the1
yacht."
"Not at all. Like yourself I have al.
ways hoped for such a trip. As to my !
dissertation upon the newly rich, it
was merely a family discussion bo-1
tween two. 1 meet all kinds of peo-;
pie in my profession and value them
accordingly. 1 am a pretty good mixer,
but I become particular when my
confession:
"gometimes, Margie," said Paula, "1
think men are right when they say
you can't reach a conclusion about
any women through what you know of
any other. Do you'know, iMaudo Lawton
In some Inexplicable way came to
teel 1 had been to blame In the affair
with her husband?
"When Earnest Lawton found that
is who and uttie aaugnter were there
be bowed very gracefully to the Inevitable.
I could see he was malting
love to Maude as devotedly as he had
to me.
' "Earnestlne fairly clung to him.
Fader, as she called him, was to her
childish mind a little tin god on wheels
and she was not happy unless she was
dragging him around at the end of
her tiny pinafore strings.
"To give him what credit is due, he
was really very fond of her and she
amused him greatly with her chlldrlsh
prattle. She was with him everywhere
and Earnest did not seem much put
ont when they were snapshotted on
the streets and the picture published
In an afternoon paper with the title.
The only real lovo of Earnest Lawton,
the stage's most popular matinee
idol.'
"c " 'Do yon know. Tiny, you will spoil
your father's business If you don't look
out, be said'. 'None of the pltty yaidles
will look at him If they know he
has a great sweetheart like you.'
"'Don't want pltty yaldles to yojk
at fader,'* was her uncompromisia.
answer.
" 'Great Scott' said one of the stage
hands who happened to be. standing
near. 'I wonder what that big Stiff
I . aimitU Ja IS it. -U-i- --
- itwum uu u wo suns aiao i run oxter
tlm. There would be no more hearts
. end flowers In his young lite.' Jus:
. then the men happened to catch t
glimpse of me and he blnshed and shutfled
out of the way.
*"I wonder It that man thinks 1
ran after Earnest Lawton,' I said to
myself, and then I felt my eyes grow
wet tor I knew that In some inexplicable
fashion Earnest had made everyone
think I had done this. Even Mrs.
Lawton. after first few days with her
husband, took this view and looked
upon me with more or less suspicion.
It made Ruth perfectly furious.
: " T don't care if she is my slstor,"
she said, '1 should think she had been
through enough of these episodes of
'AGE F
"GIRL IN OVERALLS" RE
BRITAIN; THREE ^ 191
Jjgp^gg
Cfj r^-wnHF
& mf
igp
By MARY BOYLE O'REILLY.
NEW YORJv, March 6. ? On the
night In London that war with Germany
was declared, while eager recruits
sang the anthems of the allies,
a working girl wearing a long linen
coat sprang on the plinth of Nelson's
column to address the crowd In Trafalgar
square.
"Men cannot fight alone," she cried.
"War gives women work to do."
Another girl climbed up beside her,
followed by another, each wearing factory
overalls.
There were three that night?there
are more than three million now. In
a country swept of lta young manhood,
the Girl In uveralls Is everywhere,
working at everything.
.11 their uniform of preparedness,
poor women and peeresses are one
great sisterhood.
Critics laughed at women's wireless
corps. Today crowds separate so
Girls in the Overalls may^ pass with j
their stretchers to unload arriving j
trench trains.
Severe city men nod grave approval i
as the columns of fours experiment in
handling a crowd; and soldiers just,
back from the front came to sharp sa- ]
lute at sight of girlish heads' covered j
with the red cap of danger. I
The Girl in Overalls sqt out "to do
her bit." She wished to do one thing,
and to do that well. Her one fear was
to be tried and found wanting.
Surrounded by circumstances with-1
women kind are in question. The puz-1
zle to mo is bow you made their nc-1
ouaintanre." I
"The usual way," she said careless-'1
ly. "At the Phlllpp3e lawn fete, I be- ^ ,
Ueve. But I honestly like Celly War-' 1
burton even If she is not to the man-! I
or born, I know plenty of women who j
came Into the world with the prover- i
blal silver spoon In their, mouths who I
3 OF A WIFE
1 I dJ 1
Earnest Lawton's to know Just where
place the blame. But Maude Is still i
so much In love with him she thinks |
he Is lrreBlslble to all women. i
" 'It is queer, Paula,' Ruth went on.
'the point of view some women take '
In regard to their husbands. Sometimes
1 think It Id'tba maternal Instinct
that makos them regard the men whose ;
names they bear as children. They
never think, they are to blame for i
anything. They seem to be always
thinking, "Poor boy, he was drawn {
into this by some great big man or {
some Intriguing woman. If these terrible
women would only let my poor
weak husband alone he would be all ,
risni. ,
" 'Earnest Lawton lias persuaded
Maude to take this view of your epl- I
sode, my dear, and not being with I
you ae I have, she insists you muBt 1
have know he was married. I know
she forgets ^his was your first eperi- l
ence on the stage and that under the 1
v 4
BABV 13 RECEIVING TK
LOTS OF PRESENTS - OI
W.O SENT THE JTH
BOAT, TOM^-^^SI
I
IE WEST ^RGJNIAN?FA
OR Wi
VOLUTIONIZES GREAT
4; THREE MILLION NOW
itiPKi " !
umvbbhbh^H
-MS9LJM ?- HFfcTTP' '?.>
WKm' vfc/ '
/
' '* >'''* ' "''* *?*":
>ut precedent alie has made few mis:akes.
Almost unwittingly she has
solved the suflrage problem.
Radical and tory studying her self'orgettlng
service rdmlt that hands
xuBting to cast a shell must be trustsd
to cast a vote.
Her frank practicality Had the ghost
jf Mrs. Grundy. The old gossip lies
juried with the hobble skirt and the
ango. Cramping conventionality is as
lead as the dodo.
Today well-born British girls do, as
i matter of course, what no downgcr
>11914 would dare tc contemplate. Girl
notor drivers scour tho country un:hapcroned,
women .police patrol darkened
streets and more dangerous muiltlons
areas; female farmers spade
ind plow for food bearing?and on one
joramonts but to praise.
"We expect good wages for good
work." the Girls in Overalls told the
naster munitions makers. "We shall
sot enter any trade as black legs."
That challenge won the trades unions.
Old-time women workers, long
landlcapped by low wages lack of
training, exclusion from the unions,
saw trade unions relax thoir rules
rgainst the employment of women.
"After tho war." says the Girl in
Bveralls" with cheery optimism, "men
ind women must progress together?
socially. Industrially and politically.
S'o one can now say that one-halt the
:ountry does not ltnow how the other
iialf lives.
lo not behave as well as she does." I
"What a loyal soul you are, Helen! j
But we are drifting away from tho i
rip. which Is the main Issue. You
inn't seem hgppy over the fact that 11
will be a guest on board the Nerls. j
I'm sorry. 1 had hoped you would be |
merestou.
"When I know that espionage has
much to"do with it."
"How you cling to that word! I adcircumstances
you would not be apt
to know about tho private life of ull
ictors and actresses.'
"1 looked at Ruth In amazement and
horror "and then I broke down and
wept. 'Ruth dear,' I exclaimed when
1 could speak, 'I don't believe I can
stay In this company much longer. I'm
going to try to get something else to
lo. I don't caro for the' stage.'
" 'Nonsense,' she remonstrated.
Don't you know you are doing better
on the stage than you could do in
any other business? Where could
you possibly?without any trainingBarn
sixty dollars a week but on tho
stage?' ?
" 'Only here does personality count
[or tbo highest efficiency. The thing
tor you to do, Paulu, is to marry."
"*That is what Aunt-Rachel told me,'
I answered, 'but I revolted against
selling myself even with a marriage
ring.'
" 'But must yon always sell yourself
to a rich man and fall in love with a
poor one? Don't you think It possible
,o fall in love with a rich man?' v
""Perhaps, Ruth, but I don't want
to marry any man ttst yot. I want
ny youth, my girlhood's good times.'"
T\AT%Tnr< ?. ? -
mJliNUS U*' Itlli J
US CAMS FROM THE OH JTOM,
0 SEA CAPTAIN & LITTLE
AT VISITED US A FoR TUB
WRT TIME ASO^
mmmmme&Um
[RMONT, WEDNESDAY K
3MEN
mlt that yon are an attraction, but yon
will not be tlie only guest who will
have a long lino ot ancestors behind
her. I can name one other with an
equal number ot grandfathers. To be
perfectly frank, the thought of her
helped me materially In deciding that
1 could get away. I am looking forward
with pleasure to exploring the
ruins In Egypt and roaming 'about the
wonderful Indian cities with such a
companion."
Helen did not affect to misunderstand
as to whom he meant. "I should
not Imagine Edith Schuyler one of
that kind," she replied evenly. "She
Is more given to the thought of paint
and powder than the temple, at Thebes
or the splendors of India. However,
I may be mistaken."
"What cats the best of women can
be!" Dick Orahame answered with a
laugh.
"Oh. I have possibilities when I am
aroused!"
"Possibilities? Aroused? What do
you mean?"
"My dear Dick, do you think that I
will stand quietly by and let my very
best cousin become interested in a
mere bundle of fashionable clothes?
Why. I would rather marry you myself."
She stopped, appalled by what
sho had said. "I forgot," alio ended
hurriedly.
He looked at her with eyes In whtch
there was something more than a hint
of amusement. "What was it you forgot?
The engagement you mentioned
a while ago? I wouldn't bothor about
that. Helen. It is 113 good as broken I
already."
The Neris was *o leave her anchorage
In the Potomac the middle of
January. A tew days before she sailed
two thiugB happened: One was a note
that required some thought. What
had occurred to alter Helen Livingston's
attitude toward her engagement
sho could not have explained satlsfac
torily, even to herself. Perhaps it was
an accumulation of small, unpleasant
rumors about her fiance that had been |
floating about the social atmosphero
(or moirlis post or it may have been
a realize t'on that she had made a mistake
taat determined her. Whichever
it was, it was with a feeling of rellof
that sha looked upon her ringieas -e't
hand.
The ether luppening was a fran ic
ringing of Elcliard Grahame's telephone.
, There was no answer for a long time,
then came a muffled voice she did not
recognize, and she asked again for
Dick.
Her eyes opened with at the answer.
"For heaven's sake! Mumps? On
DAINTY GUIMPE
WITH SWEATER
V? i
TV 'SfBBr
A a ?y
I
GU1MFE IN PLACE OF BLOTJSE.
By BETTY BROWN.
NEW YORK, March 7.?In spite of
the favor given to the one-piece blonso
and the coat-dress, the blouse still
keeps a certain importance in every
woman's wardrobe. But this week produces
another rival in the form of an
organdy gu'mpe with collar and matching
cuff frills.
The new guimpe is designed for
wearing with sweaters and jersey
sport coats.
DUFFS?(TOM IS ABOUT
. I ALSO UAVB 1 """
2?E?Nr
BABM - p I SOU ? WHAT I
TT- - LW ,T? J
?
VENING, MARCH 7, 1917
AND T1
QigoodZ
GLumity
NEW adapta
the straig
Jackets are br
and Com
- $29.
s
list
reai
tha'
ed
Cre
for
\
A
Fre
Blot
bother sides? Whut a slRht you must I
be!" she tried to keep the laughter f
from her voice. "I'm sorry. Dick, and c
the Neris sails on Wednesday. What d
on earth will you do? Will you be well n
enough? No? And you will miss see- d
ing the moon shine upon ruined Thebes c
with Edith Schuyler? Don't bo mail- h
clous? I'm not. I'm sorry. Sounds
like it? Laughing at your disappoint- d
ment? Of course not. How in the d
world did you catch them? You don't d
know? I wonder. I wonder. Dick, T
did you kiss any <ne when you were c
here last? Dolly? Then that ex- e
plains it. The dear child has given t
them to me, too. You are laughing. e
you brute! For that I will not tell o
you a piece of news. No. Well, then,
if you really want to hear it, 1 sent my a
engagement ring bapk this morning. f
You will give me another? What a 0
dear! That was what I was hoping j (
you would- do when I called you up." t
l| HEALTH HINTS 1|!
Heart disease is in a large measure j:
provcntablc. Most cardiac casos*cau c
be avoided by proper hygienic living. {
The infectious diseases of childhood T
frequently lead to cardiac disease. So
does rheumatism In later lite. The re- .
moval of diseased tousilB, adenoids
and the proper care of the teeth arq
the most direct and preventive moas- *
urcs against rheumatism. The valuo '
of out-of-door exercise and sufficient sleep
in well-ventilated rooms cannot "
be overestimated as a preventable \
measure.
Adults whose activities are chiefly
mental and who eat more and sleep
TRY THIS FOR A
COUNTS M
1
"PAPE'S COLD COMPOUND" END8 T
SEVERE COLD8 OR GRIP IN j
FEW HOURS. j
You can end grippe and break up
a severe cold either in bead, chest,
body (ft limbs, by taking a dose of
"Pape's Cold Compound" every two
hours until three cases are taken.
It promptly opens clogged-up nostrils
and air passages In the head,
stops nasty discharge or nose running,
relieves sick headache, dullness,
feverishnoss, 6oro throat, sneering,
soreness and stiffness. <
Don't stay stuffed-up! Quit blowing i
and snufTling! Ease your throbbing
bead?nothing else in the world gives
such prompt, relief as "Pape's Cold
Compound," which costs onlf 25 cents
at any drag store. It acts without
assistance, tastes nice, and causes no
inconvenience. Be sure you get the
genuine.
RIGHT) ?BY ALLMAN.
I GOT A HOLD OP ONB 1
OP TWO NE*J Dimbs TODAY j
TXCS ARB A NlW Pesifiltj %
AHD HAVS ONLS BBBMODT ITHD
A AMORT TIMB- PRFrrV f GOV*
donV Nod I r1 10 1
'
HE HO
Spring F
As Ne1
The Seasi
? Tailleur Si
tion of French Models; Mi
ht and narrow way that m<
aid bound and cord-edge,
es in all the new shades.
.50, $35.00, $45
- Daytime Fr<
traight and simple comes the indlsponso
it of the sun. Plaited skirts that ilii
son of thglr weight of beads and heavy
t started out in tho regular way. but wi
until thoy have become things of beaut
po Georgette, meteor, talluta and erupt
favor in the feminine eye.
$19.75, $29.75 to
inother Shipment in (
hs {$7.50, $10.0
ess than thoy should frequently suf- a
er from circulatory changes. The c
xact effect on the heart of poisons
developed by this mode of life can- ti
lOt be precisely stated, but it is evf- h
ent that it plays a definite role lu e
ausing degenerative diseases of the _
leart.
Most persons suffering from chronic
Isease of tho heart maintain a fair
legroe of health for many years, unor
favorable circumstances. But
rhen conditions aro unfavorable the
ourse of the dlscaso is usually markd
by periods of serious Illness, when
he heart, for the time, falls in Its ,
fforts to perform tho work required i1
fit. I?
The Association tor the Prevention 1 ?
nd Relief of Heart Disease has been a
ormed in Now York for the purpose u
f making a study of this diseaso and _
or bringing relief to suffering paionts.
Tho association recommends
ho vocational training in suitable ,,
rades of children suffering from heart J
Isease and the adjustment of the adult f
leart cripple to some form of labor
rhicli is within his physical limila- J:
Ions. It has been found that under
iroper supervision and control those r
n a precarious state of health cannot
inly work und earn wages without z
njury to their'hearts, but that the
rork'is of actual benefit to them.
1EALTH QUESTIONS ANSWERED
K. P.: "When 1 lie on my loft car
then sleeping it seems to closo up and
have a numb feeling In tbo ear for,
Vnrlr Mnthor Finrlo
urn muuiua imuu
Treatment I
Nothing to Swallow?Yoa Just
Bab It On.
Mothers everywhere will be Interssted
In the experience of Mrs. Chas.
!. Smith, 623 West Gas Alley, York,
Pa. Mrs. Smith tried the Southern
emedy?Vlck's VapoRub Salve, when
t was first .Introduced In York, and
writes?
"Our little four year old boy had
a cough for about a week. We gave
him everything wo knew, and nothing
seemed to do any good. So
when we got Vlck's VapoRub I
rubbed It on his chest well for two
nights and I have not heard htm
cough since. I think It la the best
medicine I have ever had In the
house."
Vlck's VapoRub comes In aalvc
orm, and When applied to the body b
| __ heat, tho Ingredients li
Rjf are released In vapor "
StSj form. These vapors are f
baled with each $
Keep a little Boov?
Micks W
^?
j Txni ?w tt* 1t: J
S. BUT ? ' f~
JK*THE j
!RNMEh(T t A
roo late fS&
I THEM
. J
- .
ashions J
on Itself 1 1
' * [email protected]|
annisn Modes that follow
irks the road to Fashion,
large contrasting Collars
.00 $67.50 I
iblo frock for (he
us, oil, ko close, by
embroidery. Sleeves
ire slashed and drapy
that make for Joy.
i de chine compete
$45.00 . 1
II
the New
i0, $12.50 I
everal hours after I get up. What
Buses tills V"
Probably a catarrhal condition of ibe
loading from middle ear to throat,
lose and throat should be thoroughly
xamlned.
AFTER JHEGRIPPE \
Mrs. Findley Made Strong By Vine).
Severy. Kan.?"The grippe left m? in
weak, nervous, run-down condition,
was too weak to do my housework
ud could not sleep. After trying dllercnt
medicines without benefit Viol
restored my health, strength and
ppetite. Viuol is a grand medloine
nd every weak, nervous, run-down wotan
should take it."?Mrs. Geo. Find
sy- ''/a?
Vlnol, which contains beef and cod
Ivor peptones, iron and manganese
cptonatcs and glycerophosphates,
hurpens the appetite, aids digostion,
nrlchcs the blood, and bnilds up
atnral strength and energy.
Crano's drug Store, Prescription
'harmacy, Mauniugton. - , ; - v;,S ||
Big GS^gfli 1
Relieve! In 1 to* C?r?
HOLD a* naceoisTg,
Peieel Poet It deelnd-Prwe n, or t bsttlet till
THB EVANS CHEMICAL CW.. CINCINNATI, ?
Ideal Cold 1
jgrHer Little Boy
roath, opening 'th^alr' passages ant
rasenlng the phlegm. Itt a res.
Bodyguard in the home" agalnit al
inns of cold troubles. 25c, 60c. ?
1.00. At all druggists.
Guano in VOUR hom^A
>^6 SALVE I
j
CSS^^ , fi .5-' "a

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