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The West Virginian. [volume] (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1914-1974, October 03, 1917, Image 6

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PAGE f\
I It in the ill
I Ifront row
HEADLINER8 TONIGHT.
Legerdemain.
Hippodrome .. Richard*. the wizard
Photoplay*.
N'elaoo An Eye (or an Eye
Dixie .......1*.. The Divorce Game
Princes* On-the-Square Girl
a MATEV'R pianists and rag-time
A organist*',have exhausted Gladys
^ * Brockwettjs patience. Henceforth.
if she We her own way and
j enough time to carry It ouL "he is
going to write a special score of music
to be used! with each of the productions
in which she stars for Wil
liam Fox.
A ^recent visit to a neighborhood
cinema theatre caused Olady's resolution.
"I went there to see.qne^of my own
pictures," said the Fox star. "Whetf
ujB weauing scene was nasiteu 00 ine
screen, the organist played 'The
Maiden's Prayer.' When the hero
took the pledge, the selection was the
Drinking Song from 'Rostlcana.' When
my 111m husband cast me aside in favor
of another woman, the music-maker
gave "For Me and My Gal'
"Throughout the entire picture, the
elections were one absurdity alter
1 another. 1 couldn't sit through the
film. The music kept me in such a
state of nervous excitement that I was
disturbing my neighbors.
"That determined me. I loft tho
theatro in a rage, drove Into the
thickest forest 1 coaid find, and snt
down to think. 1 decided that hero
after I should write the musical accompaniments
for my own pictures.;
and I thoroughly expect to do It." j
Richards "Stands 'em Up" Again.
Getting standing room was a "con
sumatlon devoutciy to be wished for'
by many who got to the Hippodrome
after 7:30 last night to see the Great
Richards and his show of wonders.
Approximately a half hour before the
show began the lobby was filled with
a throng of expectant ticket purchasers
but it was too late for those in
the rear of the crowd and only a
very few of those who were crowded
about the hox office window were
able to secure the covted pasteboards.
Many took advantage of the opportunity
to get seats for the second performance
and others bought standing .
room, but there was not enough of1
even that and many left disappointed.
The matinee yesterday drew a goodsized
matinee crowd, but there was
probably fifty vacant chairs, and the
second show could have accommodated
probably another half hundred or
more. If the crowds could have been
more evenly distributed there would
jih?b uccu uw uisa ppwi it i in i ii i - ?inii ii
behooves those who <lo not wish to |
miss the final opportunity to see the j
many amazing things the wizard Joe ;. ]
to get seuts early or attend the last |:
show tonight. A contpiete change oi I
i program Is in ef'ert today Tlie tir i i
performance will begin promptly at!
7:45 and the last at !i o'clock. Doors .
are open at 7:15. Grace MoCloskey ;
will entertain the crowd with piano ,
E5 overtures and the cinema operators
will reel off a good picture while
Sammy passes among us with extra
well-filled hags of freshly popped:
corn at a nickel per
Gee! Just like a circus?all Imp
, . the lemonade. i
Three Good Ones at Nelson.
The Stingaree picture Is headlined 1
' ' at tho Nelson today. True Hoardntan j
appears in another oi this series
which is called "An Eye for an Eye," 1
and portrays in his usual gingery '
manner a story with a decided punch.
A Pokes and Jabs comedy is offered
as the fun maker. it is called
"Ploughing the Clouds" and presents I
the favorite actors in a number of
tunny situations and startling stunts. <
A picture of greatest interest at the t
present time is "Training Our Khaki
Clad Heroes." As the title suggests t
Its character It is only necessary to t
add that It is replete with detail and
not to he confound with the regular I
News pictures. It shows the manner I
In which Uncle Sam takes the rookie (
and makes of him a "fighting man" of
the highest type. Mollie
King Star at Princess.
The "On-theSquaro Girl." at the '
Princess, presents an appealing pic- 1
???? ui o JOUU5 Uluurl ? nu II KUIP uti
Dative simplicity and innocence In the
atmosphere of tainted luxury which
surrounds her. Most of the scenes
are laid in the shop of an ultra fashionable
modiste and hare a particular
appeal to the feminine members of
the audience for the gowns displayed
by the mannequins are actual French
models shown hv special permission
of an exclusive Fifth Avenue shop
The exterior scenes are set in snowy
mountain country and are most effectively
directed. Many of the original
touches in the development of the
story are the result of the direction
and the skillful acting, for the plot
in itself follows the conventlonol lines
of shop-girl drama.
We first see the young heroine posing
in the modiste shop, where she
is pursued by an elderly admirer
whom she has repulsed with horror.
He managed to lure her into a secret
room .however, and in the struggle
which follows she stabs him and
leaves him for dead. Later she learns
through her mother's letters that the
man is her own father, but by this
time she has found a protector In a
noble yonng millionaire, and as the
father turns up. alive and repentant,
at the last moment, all ends blissful\
Mollis King makes a very touching
\ picture as the persecuted model and
\ looks exceedingly charming in each
\ of her various costumes.
Message In Howe Pictures.
What makes the engagement of
Lyman H. Howe's Travel Festival at
the Grand on Saturday, fit far more
Importance than that of possibly any
other attraction, la the tremendous
message It conveys from "Somewhere
in the Atlantic." It comes from Uncle
Sam's New Navy to the nation
whose bulwark that navy is In these
momentous days of the Great World
War. It depicts the swiftest things
that the human race has ever put in
motion?the big projectiles . hurled
from our super-dreadnaughta at a
pressure of forty thousand poenda per
square Inch?at a heat at which diamonds
melt pnd carbon holla. The
IKh.^ -
-.1 ' i
TI
Brine ot thsss "salvoa" la shown by
light u wall H by day and while flbe
eproductioa of the broadside Bred by
day are extremely spectacular, yet
those that are Bred tinder tbe coyer
of night are even more no. besides
presenting most weird ejects.
Mr. Howe also Imparts a ^ graphic
conception of what London nees during
& Zeppelin raid. This li s - trick"
film made by a stood artist whe'was
an obserrer of a reel aerial encounter
Alice Beady ad Dixie Today.
"The Divorce aesp?r;' at ?bf Diaie,
Is an amosing bkt'of.SetrSrhVCh makes
no attempt to be'shriojis, bet tripe
along from one .ejegjpedtagly French
complication to acoffier. There are
gaps In the action which suggest
that the idea was more adapted to
three reels than to live, but this flagging
Interest is ;geoera!1y caught up
again by the vigorous work of a< tors
who have fa)ieD in with the aplf t of
the plecp and play their ptart? with
in" sorio cqn^ic. ao&naon or rrencn
actor* to.a.cfiacacteflstic farce
The stojwis woven around'the efforts
ot.ap' extravagapt young married
con pie to pay their debts by divocing
ea'eh other and thus obtain the
entire dowry of the bride. Their efforts
to become innocently compromised
while remaining technically
virtuous lead them into all manner of
domestic difficulties, which end happily.
however, and leave them a sadder
and wiser bride and groom.
The vivacious personality of Aiiee s
Brady and a series of elaborate Pari- |
sian costumes give it da3h and color.
It is a world release and besides the
ttar has John Bowers. Arthur Ashley,
Kate 1.ester. Joseph Herbert, John
Drumler, and Marie I.avarre in the '
cast. i
? ? 1
| "CLOSE-UPS" | J
?"One at a time please!" "Don't 1
push!" "Standing room only!" "Get
tickets for the next show"?all this
is quite a tax on the ticket "sales- 1
man's" voice. Why not get a phonograph.
Wouldn't even be necessary i
to change the record. ?Julian
Eltinge is about through f
with his seconil Paramount production
under Donald Crisps direction. Marian
Fairfax Is working on his third seen
ario which Win. C. De Mllle will
probably direct.
?Vivian Martin has a chance to t
wear some pretty modern gowns in
her new Paramount picture being
Aimed under direction of Robert
Thornby. She welcomes the change
04JL
?~? ~
MONONGAlP ij
?? 'I
Fire Scare.
All the children ot the Tlioburn public
school were marched out of the
rhool building yesterday when it was
feared that some of the woodwork iu
the basement near the boilers was on
lire. There was 110 excitement whatever
and in a few seconds after the
Harm was given all the children werej(
r.ut of the building. The authorities j
were well pleased with the excellent
way in which the children marched
[mm the building.
Monongan Boys.
Two young men from this town willleave
tomorrow tor Camp Lee to rep
lesent Monongah in the new National |
it my. They are Junior Orr and Wall:
icr Pyles, both exceptionally well
viiown here. Pyles and Orr are both
111lie employment of the Consolidation
.'cal company, Orr having worked in ,
he olficc at Hutchinson. J
Personals.
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Pyles were In 1
[ 'hiimout yesterday afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. Howard W. Showaiter. J
Fairmont, motorad to Monongah yes- '
erdav afternoon.
Miss Dorothy Knapp. of Fairmont.
*as in town yesterday evening calling s
>n friends and attending to shopping 1 J(
Mil s Maud Yoak, a school tea-her o; 1
ftivesville, was in Monongah during I
he week visiting her sister, Miss r
J race Yoak. p
Mrs. I'erry Thompson, of Fairmont, j
was among the out of town business
wallers in Monongah yesterday. p
I.co Salvati was in Fairmont yester- r.
iay evening attending the annual p
spring reception at the Normal school. U
llerschel Smith was among the local it
social callers in Fairmont yesterday h
tning. \
!.. AY. Shaver, o" t'leveiai ;. t'iv.o. t
was in Monongah this morning as a c
business transactor. 1
M. Silverman was In Fairmont yesterday
evening calling on friends. 7
Mrs. R. Pollitt, of Fairmont, was in
Monongah yesterday calling on friends c
and attending to shopping. f
Miss Davinna Watkins was in Fair- t
mont this morning attending to shop- <=
ping. t
At THE NEL
AN EYE FO
True Boardman in the original S
rough life, played by character! that
PLOUGHING '
Pokes and Jabbs are the fancy artli
make things go rather lively.
TRAINING FOR OUR K
K reel that has more genuine inf
training his soldiers tor their fight
book will give.
TOMORROW:
IU MYCEFT r
I
Mn
t
iR WEST yiBGlWAK?FA]
THE REAL TRUTH
MURDER
After a treroenodus effort made to
lave her life, Edith Cavell stood j
dindfolded before the heart-seeking j
Jerman sharpshooters.
Even the German chaplain was j I
breed to admit that. He had Just !'
vatched the brave little English ?
turse topple over lifeless?murdered
?her heart torn apart by the bullets
>f a German firing squad in the miliary
prison of St. Gilles.
n
"I must hare no hatred or bittertess
toward anyone."
That is Edith Caveli herself talkngl
Those were her last words, the
poken to an English clergyman just ' by
tefore she was led from her cell to'cnl
lie. .the
The last days of Edith Cavell's life! the
?and her last hour?are graphically j upr
tortrayed by the American who led |
hose working dny and night to save pga
he English nurse. Mis
Hugh Gibson, an American lega- Tin
tion secretary in Brussels, now re
vealR to the world this blackest | ;
page in the book of German out- of I
ragev. Writing in the forthcom- nLti
ing October World's Work,. Gibson to i
shows with damning simplicity the
cynical and cowardly stealth with Gal
which the Germans kept him in ! mi:
ignorance of the progress of the 'Get
case, and how they lied to every |pij<
person interested in Miss CavelPs Mr.
defense, even including the Ameri- ; l.ev
ran and Spanish ministers, to the 'jud
very minute of ber death The :od.
following extracts from his report ;
are reproduced here by special per- Ithe
mission of World's Work to The lhav
West. Virginian. ,fivn
? sen
"On August 5. 1915. Miss Edith leg;
\ivcll, an Englishwoman, directress j fire
>f a large nursing home at Brussels, j rha
vas quietly arrested by the German | par
icthorities." writes Gibson, begin- j
ting his terrible indietmcnt or Missivon
"avcli's murderers. "She was confin-iat
I in the prison of St. Gilles on the pea
harge that she had aided stragglers i
rom the allied armies to escape the
irross the frontier from Belgium to not
folland. jus
iernian High Officials Keftisrd to I,of ter
S. Hepresentntives See ed.
Miss Cavell. ,
"It was some time before news of w)i
ilisti Cavell's arrest was received by Cat
he American legation. Minister nig
Vhltlock addressed a note to the Get- be
rtan authorities requesting authoriz- i "
tion for Maitre Gaston de I.oval. !e-jcke
:al counsel for the legation, to con-i got
ult with Miss Cavell. and. If desir-jthe
hie. entrust some one with her de-jhaf
rnse. tail
"No reply was received, and on '
ept. 10 the legation addressed a note brh
o Baron von der Lanchcn. chief of ami
he political department. Am
"On Sept. 12 a reply from the ba- app
on refused permission for any mem- ed
er of the legation or counsel to see noj
tiss Cavell. "
"It n*no ninnif#??tlv lmnn?sihln tn no
repare any defehse save In the pres- offi
nee of t.he eourt and during the pro- oou
ress of the trial. Maitre dc Leval t'm
as asked to remain away from the bee
rial. It was pointed out to him that to 1
is presenre would only serve to harm Gei
Ilss Cavell rather than help her; that
he Judges would resent the presence '
if a representative of the American eat
pgation.
"The trial began on Thursday, Oct. ,
and ended the following day. ?
"Miss Cavell's conduct before the ;
ourt was marked by the greatest j
rankness and courage. She stated i
hat she had assisted these men to j
scape Into Holland because she I
hought that if she had not done so |
SON Today
R AN EYE
Ungaree series. A good story of
give It the last tinge of realism.
rHE CLOUDS
its In this comedy sketch, and they
HAKI CLAD HEROES
ormatlon about how Uncle Sam is
with the Germane than a whole
rt" a big feature production and
VU. SWBVU SOUE ,
C*V> Ui\TU .
ji t^e <. j? hot?
- -
MOOT, WEWBUUTl
r ABOUT EDITH
IS TOW THE H
^ :
tOTTH^V
;.avELJ-. jfr, ,
/ Jm
y would have been seized and shot \
the Germans; that she felt she had
y done her duty in helping to save
ir lives.
The public prosecutor asked that
court pass the sentence of death
m Miss Cavoll.
'After the trial Maftre de Leval
in was refused permission to see
is Cavell."
? Struggle Americans Made to Save
Condemned Knglisli Woman.
Cow begins the writer's narrative
:lie condemned woman's last hours
! of the struggle Americans made
?ave her life;
'Mons. de Leval. asked that Mr. i
tan. the Knglish chaplain, be per
ted to visit her. Conrad (of the |
man Political Department) re-j
m! that It had been decided that
Gahan could not see her: that De j
*al could not see her until the I
rrment was pronounced and sign-'
lie stated (Oct. 11 ? that even it
judgment had been given it would j
c no effect, until it had been con-; *
ned bv the governor, who was ab-jf<
t. We asked Conrad to inform the' l
ation immediately upon the con- j h
nation of the sentence in order jc:
t steps might he taken to secure a j fj
don. Conrad promised. ' w
'Dos te the promise we were ner- j v.
is and apprehensive and remained }c
the legation all day. making re- .j
ted Inquiry.
'At 6:20 p. m. we once more had
most definite assurances that.1*
hing had happened. (This was H
t one hour and twenty minutes af- j t<
the sentence had been pronounc- f
> I
'At 8:30 I had just gone lioinejSJ
en I ) TwnnpfpH flint \T(oe I S(
ell was to hp shot during the a
ht. We set off to see what eould !
done. jl<
We found that Baron von der I.an- j"
n and all members of his stafT had I
to to spend the evenlne at one of (V
little disreputable theaters thati"
1 sprung up there for the enter-; il
iraent of the Germans. i ti
'Laneken came in about 10:30. I
pfly explained to him the situation j n
I presented the note from the j tl
lerican minister transmitting the j
leal for clemency. Laneken show- pi
no feeling aside Trom cvnleal an-|tl
ance. | o'
'Finally Laneken agreed to Inquire j h
to the facts, telephoned from his i
ce to tin presiding judge of the it
irt-mnrtlal, and returned in a short w
ip to say that sentence had indeed t<
n passed, and that Miss Cavell was T
be shot during the night,
rmans Sneer at Pleas for Merry in
the Vamp of Hiimnnity. o
'We then presented with all the!
nestnc s at our commbnd the plea j S
f-IIPPOl
A A Place of Clean Am
TOMORROW, FRIDAY, S
BIG TIME V;
^ i F. L. GRAN1
NOVELTY JUGGLING J
I ADELIN]
IRISH MONOLOU
Clin ,110 DARNED GOOE
OlioWS ,N A COMEDY SINGING
[)oj|w "SOME I
W?"J THREE B
Completing a hl?tory making week
retort.
PRICES?Matinee at 3 15c; Nlgl
CHESTNUT
AN&<U?C.L TEIX _
Y60 TWE
: */*-. , . i
OCTOBER 8,1
CAVELL'S
?ORLD AT LAS1
3H "BOOSTS?. nroro.
#
THE LAST HOURS OF
EDITH t'AVELL'S LIFE
Aug. it?Quietly arrested and
taken to prison of St. GUles.
Sept. 10?American legation,
kept In ignorance of arrest, takes
steps for defense.
Sept. 12?Permission for counsel
to see her refused.
Oct. 7?Trial begins.
Oct. 8?Trial ends.
Oct. 9?Legation makes plea for
clemency.
Oct. 10?American petition to
see Miss Cavell refused.
Oct. 11?Miss Cavell's own pastor
denied admittance to her cell.
5 p. m.?Sentence pronounced in
cell.
0:20 p. m.?American legation
told sentence was not yet pronounced.
8 p. nt.?Chief of German political
department refuses to leave
disreputable theater to receive appeal
for clemency.
1030?He returns to department
and sneers at pleas of American
and Spanish ministers.
Midnight?Military governor decline
to stay execution.
Oct. 12 ? Her last hour. .
Her pastor hasitly summoned.
Miss Cavell partakes of holy communion.
Kneels in prayer. Clergyman
commanded to leave. German
milit ry chaplain takes his place.
Soldiers lead her from cell. Firing
squad awaits her. Their bullets
tear through her body. German
chaplain huries her in prison yard.
"She died like a heroine!"
rr clemency. We all pointed out to
ancken tlie horror of shooting a wolan.
no matter what her offense, and
ndeavored to impress upon him the
lightful effect that such an execution
oiild have throughout the civilized
orld. With a sneer, he replied that
n the contrary, he was confident that
re effect would be excellent.
"The Spanish minister and I tried
' prevail upon Lancken to call Great
[eadquarters at Charlevllle on the
dephone and have the case laid berre
the emperor for his decision. He
rid lie could not do anything of the
:irt. After further argument he
greed to get Gen. von Sauberchweig,
re military governor, out of bed to
am whether there was any chance
it clemency.
"Lancken was gone half an hour,
fhen he returned he reported that
re military governor considered inictoin
of the death penalty Imperave.
"We did not stop until after mldIght,
when It was only too clear that
lere was no hope.
"It was bitter business, leaving the
lace feeling that we had failed, and
rat the little woman was to be led
ut before a firing squad within a few
ours.
"But it was worse to go back to the
gatlon to the little group of English
omen who were waiting in my office
i learn the result of our visit."
lie X'nforgetable Story of Edith
("avoirs Last Hours.
And this is Miss Cavell's last hour
n earth:
After Secretary Gibson and the
panish minister had gone preparaDROME
usement for the Whole Family
A TURD AY, OCT, 4, 5, 6
UJDEVILLE
? & SISTER
kND BALANCING ACT "J
E CARR %
UE AND SONGS
> AND FUNNY R
NOVELTY ENTITLED UdjU
3IMPS" only
IG ACTS '
: it your popular prlo* imuaamint
lit at 7:45 and 9:00 15c and 2Se
CHARLIE
" '? t "...
91T."
Mom for the murder were hurried.
Hardly had tha Americans left
1 when Mr. Gahan .the English clergyman,
waa summoned to the prison.
Together they partook of the holy
communion. She said she had nothing
to regret, and that If she had It
all to do orer again she would change
nothing.
A few moments she knelt In prayer!
Then Mr. Gahan was commanded
to leave.
Th# f,#rm?n
with a German military chaplain.
Blindfolded. Edith Carell was led
to the open grave. The firing squad I
aimed. It fired!
The first raya of the sun streaked i
the clods of the rude grave In the
prison yard.
"She died like a heroine." com
mented the German chaplain.
GIRLS!BEAUTI[Y
YOUR HAiit AND
STOP DANDRUFF
HAIR BECOMES CHARMING. WAVY,.
LUSTROUS AND THICK IN
FEW MOMENTS.
!
; EVERY BIT OF DANDRUFF DISAPPEARS
AND HAIR STOP9
COMING OUT.
i *
i For 25 cents you can save your hair.
In less than ten miDutes you can double
Its beauty. Your hair becomes
lght, wavy, fluffy, abundant and ap
pears as soft, lustrous and charming
as a young girl's after applying sunnIlanderine.
Also try this?moisten a
cloth with a little Danderlne and carc'
fully draw It through your hair, taking
| me small strand at a time. This will
cleanse the hair of dust, dirt or excessive
oil, and in just a few moments
you have doubled the beauty of your
bair. A delightful surprise awails
those whose hair has been neglected or .
scraggy, faded, dry. brittle or thin. Be1
-tides beautifying the hair. Danderlne
dissolves every particle of dandrufT:
cleanses, purifies and invigorates the
scalp, forever stopping itching and fallI
ir.g hair, but what will please you most '
will be alter a few weeks' use. when
you see new hair?fine and downy at
first?yes?but really new hair grow
[ ng all over the scalp. If you care for
t pretty, soft hair .and lots of it, surely
I get a 25-cent bottle of Knowlton's Dan- j
c'.erine from any drug store or toilet
counter and just try it.
IjJIPPOl
Lower Floor
Change of Pre
LAST TWO TIM]
RICHARDS
"THE WIZARD" I
CARLOAD OF SPECIAL SCEN- |
ERY, TAPESTRIES AND
AMAZING EFFECTS.
The 12-cylinder 80-horse-power H
mystery fun show De Luxe of the 9
Twentieth Century, the entire 5
production being mounted with a 5
sumptuous gorgeousness that
makes It mightiest and most atu- ?j
pendous mystery attraction now is
touring America.
THE SHOW OF A THOUSAND |
WONDERS
LAUGHS ? MUSIC
MYSTERY ? THRILL8 L1
0 0 ? BEWILDERING
SiSsZ
VJl- DISCC
v o u c
II hunt till. CASH DISCOUNT VOUCHI
I of thu n?wtpap*r and wcurt tha $3. to]
MAIL ORDERS?Sime tertni u abort. Be
8 croti extra within ISO miles; ltc. ISO to SOt
ant. to indode for 4 lb*. Address this aewipt
%\ VJEUL,
?s ') tawwwAs
H ^cWBTUe ^4
p CAftp 7
f . * . . ,
k _
Wliai I
6he doesn't know that, j
Resinol
would clear her skin ]
"She would he a pretty girl, if it
wasn't for that pimply, blotchy complex- (J
ion I" But the regvlar use ol Resinol Q
Soap, aided at first by a little Resinol S
Ointment,would probably make it dear, V
fresh and charming. If a poor sldn is
1 'ur handiran o?:?i
r> -?r-' ?? ? ??v?iiivi ,
Soap and see how quickly it Improve?.
Record OioRMot and Reaiaol Soap canal)? stop
ttchfoc i-motly and qokklv heal ecsena saddwUar
akio ti ruble*. Sold by all cnmista.
randI
THEATER
SATURDAY OCT. 6
Matinee and Night. j
litKjB
y| REAL WILD WEST l)s&
Prices?Matinee 25c & 35c
Children under 12, 15c.
Night, 50c, 35c, 25c.
Seats at Martin's Book Stors on
Thursday morning.
P ROME |
25c; Balcony, 15c.
>gram Today
ES TONIGHT |
"
RM ^
WCi wHH^H
SENSATIONS ? 10 0
man
)UN?? SlaT/
;h e r,
The West Vireinlan
Fairmont, W. V?.
HE NATIONS AT WAR
bj W ILLIS J. ABBOT
This hook corn# the entire history of tha
war up to the official announcement of
America# entry into the great conflict.
Contains alaoat 600 illustrations from < d
photograph*, map* and charts. fOxnat- '
nifieent full-pact color plates. Sua ?>C 1 i
104 incbe*. 4i8 pages. beautifully UwiPQ
in a rich blue art Telluns.
REGULAR PRICE $3.00
But reader* of this newspaper can dip gad '
ore this CASH DISCOUNT VOUCHER
aa ft JO towards the payment of UuafJ,
ir.i'a rc a cash outlay of only 91 JO. _
As the cost of printer, paper and bisdiaf ir <.
u constantly increasing we may not be abb
to aware an additional supply of books?
80 ACT QUICKLY.
I We reserve the right to discontinue this
I special offer at any time. Those who do I
1 not use this Cash Discount Voucher most,, M
pay tbe full regular price of $3. ' * J
The advantage of being one of our 1
readers is proven by the actual aav? M
ing under this discount offer. 2* <
;r with $1.80 IN CASH at the office
ume at once. . V *11
sure to endose the Discount Voucher and fc]
) mi.; for greater distances ask postmaster I"
^ oeuce op " ^ J
gblamonds!
. ' 9 ?

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