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The West Virginian. [volume] (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1914-1974, August 31, 1922, Image 1

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K August 30 5TU I ? % ^ ^gj ~l j?M I [?B J 1 | rar,ly cl<\ram?r1?>id^d Frid*T"
I I -^nu^uorc^.an^^^l %2-J^ A I A- ftl i^ A %" i A1 IJ^ ' '
I Closing New York Stocks, Page 8 \ More than a Newspaper?A TW^e force hi tl* C^anfa " " - Full Associated Press Wire
E r^PT^PED_1845 _____FMRMONf!w". VA.. THURSDAY EVENING. ^88* SINGLE COPY 5 CENg^
mm
\ and cTaSon
i DMSIONS SHORT
???Car Supply Today Less Than
PP*:- at Any Time Since Shop/
men Walked Out'
364 MINES WORKING
|k ' .Other Railroads- in Northern
. West Virginia Able to
V Supply Demand.
Tj Once again the car supply is
(V-i/iV ragged on the lionongah and
Ktf'k'ilS.ChaTleston divisions, B. & O.,
joB there being but an 18 per cent car
' supply on the Monongah Division
fyj and a 13 per cent supply on the
jjr Yi Charleston "Division today. The
SkL Cumberland and Connellsville divert
.visions, B. At O.. have a full car
|?>j2,tsupp]y, which is also true of the
Sv?"Morgantown & Kingwood Railway
which is operated by the B. & 0.
if ; While the B. & O. is hopelessly
spS crippled, the Monongahela. Morgg>V:
' Santown & Wheeling and Western
^'Maryland branches have a 100
MS* . per cent car supply.' This they
have had ever since the strike
4". ' / ended.
_ mines on the Monongah
kDivision. B. & O., today ordered
50 empties and only 3 00 were
Ipj^^VpXa^ced. at 7 o'clock. The run of
^empties on the division totaled
f 478. Alone the Charleston Divi'
B. & O.. there were 24 cars
;V ..placed this mornin? at 7 o'clock
although 1S1 empties were orderthere
are S64 mfo.es -[active.
jKvhic'a Is 54 less than the number
tjgl githat worked yesterday. The
P|p:?miiCes that worked today ordered
Trjcars, which was 217 mo/e
Sp' ASan weanesaay s totai.
4 V* '1,389 Cars bonded
aBBjg-'Coia mines Jn. Northern West
.Virginia last -week loaded 1.5S!)
3?,.,-. cars ot coal against 1,58 3 Tuesday
S-ip.V and 1,842 on Monday. Car shorf.i..
. tage has cut the tonnage to
TPJ-l (Continued on Page Pour)
rP. P' r
^rEALE OF CONTRACT"
?The Board of Education of
' Union district will sell the con^Ptract
for furnishing coal to the
schools of that district, on Sat?||w|
.ugday September 2nd. Pleasant
-Sw I -Valley, Bentons Ferry and Kingy:
[ mnnt will be sold at the Kingte
:. j 'mont school house and all oth;gf?::;|
ers will be sold at Springer
I School house. Sale to begin at
.1 '5:30 o'clock P. M.
V I M. BERT STANLEY,
Secy. Board
"f II I
I .
biPHONE, SEND,
|H ' - BRING 'EM IN
Don't miss getting the best
possible results at the smallest
fcost by ordering a "want ad" to'
-day for
|| * THE WEST
VIRGINIAN
, ' Call 1105 and ask for
M 1 AN AD TAKER
Ti _ a
kf?^rr: i
II I. VV . U ii
I CAFETERIA
I yL* ?Finishing
^ f ?Touches
' I
I.A few things that add a delightful
touch to your meal?
Salads
Salad Pressings
| Soups
L. " Relishes
Jelly
L. Service
" At the Cafeteria you have a
large selection of .foods to
choose from, and you can see
the very things before you or-'
Vmi will rprpivo nromnt
and courteous service from the
young lady waitresses.
...j 11:15 A. M. TO 2:00 P. M.
Hk 5:15 P. M. TO T:0O P. M. *
M 210 Monroe St.
ICITE M
DDADT
rnvn
OKLAHOMA QL
DO YOU REMEMBER BACK IN
I hits at the Oklahoma state fair we
] Hollis quadruplets? Remember
I Well, here's how they- look today
| ting in the chair? and Jlonn (left
j chair. The parents, Mr. and Mr
! to take them to the fair again.this
they've grown. J
iffliSnr'
I Qfiim-irpfj iulf ..
UUUlTTOirrm; J
HERE*GEB|
! Details of Program Announced
?Delegates? to Arrive
Next TuesdayBishop
U. V. W. E-arlington oj^
Huntington -will preside at the an- f
naal conference of the Methodist i
Episcopal Church. South which will j
be held here, starting Wednesday j
of next week,,.in the Billingsley
Memorial Methodist Episcopal
Church. Reports. in church circles
are to the effect that the conference
will this .year create a new
district, to be known as the Beckley
District, which will comprise
the Williamson section of the present
Huntington dlstiret and the
Fayette and Raleigh sections of
the Charleston district .The district
parsonage will be located in Beckley.
Most of the preachers and delegates
to the conference will arrive
Tuesday afternoon and the opening
sermon of the conference will be..
preached by the Rev. J. F. Baker,
(Continued on Page Four)
- =??
| RE-OPEN CITY TAXI
! All Hudson cars, closed
and open. Day and night
I service. Call 795. t .
'if J
LABOR DAY
CELEBRATION
Allied Assembly of United
Mine Workers of America.
Monday, Sept. 4,
Traction Park (Monongah)
Two Base Ball Games i
Dancing Afternoon and Evening i
lr -Jl
[-FOR SALE"!
At a very reasonable
price 1 1-2 ton Packard
truck. Good condition.
DIAMOND I
Ice Cream Co. j
1 ' -1
INERSA
ISAL AT
FADRUPLETS ' |
1915 WHEN ONE OF THE
ire four cooing girl babies, the
pictures of (hem that year?
. Roberta (left) and Leota. sit)
and Mary, on the arms of the
s. F. M. Keys of Hollis decided
s year and let folks see how
iaoiiTr
BEINGlSOUSSED
Application Filed to Develop j
Stream for Water Power
FacilitiesAccording
to announcement made ;
yesterday, application has been fil-1
ed by the West Virginia Power &'
Transmission Co., of Pittsburgh
with the Federal Power Commis-:
sion at Washington for permission
to engagfe. in water power development
on the Cheat River and its
tributaries located in Monongalia,
Preston, Tucker and Randolph
counties of this" state and Fayette
County in Pennsylvania.
The applicant company* under-;
stood to be a part of AV'est'
Penn interests of Western Pennsyl-1
vania, has given out no statement j
of what its detailed plans call for
but in well informed circles it, is
understood that it is proposed to
carry to completion the partially
constructed hydro-electric dam in1
"West Virginia near the state line I
at Cheat Haven, Pa., commenced
twelve years ago by the Kuhn interests
known as the Hydroelectric
Co. of West Virginia, and abandoned
when that concern became
unable to carry through the financial
undertaking involved. Other
power developments farther up
Cheat.River and on its tributaries
in the tour West Virginia counties
are to be developed ultimately, it
(Continued on Page Pour)
- - ,i
WANTED
Practical-mining man, one who
understands bossing. Wanted
for Truck Mine. Apply Box MM
Care The West Virginian.
IF i j
" ~ I "
NOTICE
Home Cooked Meals. ?8.00
per week, 21 meals. 206
Walnut avenue.
r - _ j
f NOTICE
COAL OPERATORS:
-For prompt service
and reasonable price on
your electrical : repair
j work,
e;aii vzy
MINE SERVICE
SUPPLY CO.
W. ,J. Stuck," Mgr.
r iii 111 si
,,;5?g
ICCEPT
CONFEI
- i
ALLIES AGREE TO
ACCEPT NEW PLAN
FOR (pfROMISE
Moratorium to Be Granted
Germany Under Terms
Made by BelgiansPARIS,
Aug. 31?(By the AssoI
ciated Press)?The allied reparations
commission has decided to
accept the Belgian compromise on
the German moratorium proposition
as a solution of the present
crisis, it was learned this afternoon.
A formal vote will be taken
before the day is over, it was said.
M. Dubois went into consultation
with Premier Poincare with
the purpose or Dunging ro me i
commission the French government's
decision as to -whether it
would accept or decline the Belgian
compromise.
Under the plan brought forward
by M. Delacroix, the Belgian
member of the commission. Belgium.
in lieu of the remaining
cash payments from Germany this
year, to which she is entitled
under a priority agreement, would
[ accept treasury . bills from the
I German government, payable in
I six months.
I These bills would total more
I than 250,000,000 gold marks and
| Germany would offer further
guarantees for their redemption
i when due.
The decision of the commission
was reported by the British, Belgian
and Italian members under instructions
from their respective
government regardless of the |
French government's attitude: ' j
The reparations commission
late today unanimously accepted
the Belgian compromise on the I
German moratorium proposition. j
M. Dubois,-,tbe French member!
e?. thft^connnissioni.aioted .with hisj
\CoUeagues~aftera long.- interview
"between sessions with " Premier"
Poincare. .
The commission rejected the motion
of Sir John Bradbury oi Eng
land for a moratorium without further
guarantees. The first ballot
1 on this motion was a tie, France
and Ilaly for it. M. Dubbois. as
president of the commission, then
! cast his second and deciding vote.
VOTE ON BONUS
EXPECTED TODAY
i i
i
i Senator Lodge Advocates
Measure in Opening Final
Day of Argument.
WASHINGTON, Aug. 31.?A final
-?*? ? c/vldlflrc* Knnna Vi K i 11
?UUC UU cuiuiiii o WV~UW ?
before adjournment of the Senate
today yappeared reasonably certain.
All pending amendments
had been disposed of and general
debate begun before the recess last
night. As far as leaders were advised
three or tour senators planned
to deliver addresses, but there
was likelihood of another discussion.
The days' discussion in the Senate
was opened by Senator Lodge
the Republican leader, who argued
that the government owed compensation
to th soldiers and disputed
the theory that the proposed bonus
would prove too great a burden on
the treasury. The majority leader
pointed out that practicaclly all of
the allied nations had recognized
the service of their troops in a
substantial manner and declared
that such grants could not be treated
as commercializing patriotism.
17*
WANTED
Girl with experience to help
in restaurant. Must furnish reference,
AduIv in Derson to Mr.
| II Nuzum at
II OWENS BOTTLE CO.
[i- * .4
FOR RENT
FOUR ROOM APARTMENT,
bath, heat, two private porches.
Private entrance. First floor.
Close in. Apply 204 Albert Court.'
' J
f . . - .t
If ' J
FOR SALE
American Adding Machine, J
Oliver Typewriter. Almost new.
525.00 takes both. WILSON
SALES COMPANY
| Phone 18S3 J
. .
r)
STRIKE
RENCEI
I UTELLUMS |
By J, A. la.
Who knows what Friday night
WIIXBE?
Soft and warm and gay
AXD FREE,
Or wild and dark and cold
WET, ?
We've not been notified
AS YET.
But be the weather what
ITMAY
Soft and warm and free
AYDGAIl.
Or wet and wild and cold
AX DP ARK,
'Twill make no difference
IXTKKPAEK
Where all the business girls
WELUBE
To welcome-us to
KEVKLRY.
Come one. come all, lame,
HALTA.N'DBLIXD
Let jolity he unc'on[
FIXED.
The fun that's offered will
BESCCH
That cripples will forsake
j THEpRUTCH,
And folks with bunions, corns
ANDGOUT
Their painful ailments will
FLOUT,
And dins a mean and wicked
HEEL,
And naught but joy and
GLAJ1XESSFEEL.
Who knows what Friday night
AVILIiBE?
The weather man moves
Secretly.
But let him do his
VERYWORST?
Vho nnrt- r*r? FrHaV Tlicht
AVI UNBURST
With mirth and laughter full
A.VDl'REE,
As though the sua shone
MEBKILT.
CHmfiEY
5
International Representative
of Miners' Union Wants
to Be Transferred.
Charles H. Batley, international
representative. United Mine Workers
of America, left this morning i
for a trip to Kirksvine, mo., to;
visit his 'folks and it is not very J
likely that he will return to this,
field.
It is understood that Mr. Bately
has made a. request that he be transferred
from the local field. The
resignation of the local post has
not been, accepted by the international
officers as yet. but it is believed
that it will be and that he
will be transferred to some other
field.
Mr. Bately has been in West Virginia
probably seven years. He
went to Charleston in 1916 as provisional
secretary of district 17,
when an insurgent movement was
in thn mnks nf the United Mine (
Workers of America. For two years
Mr. Batley has been in Fairmont
as an International representative
and more particularly as a personal
representative of John L. Lewis
president of the United Mine Workers
of America. He has been connected
with the labor movement tor
many years and was a stand patter
on the policy of "live up to your
contract." . .
With the Workers
Nick Aiello, president of sub district
4. is in the Morgantown section
today to sign up several companies.
Frank McCartney, district board
member, and Frank Miley, scale
committee member, are in the
Clarksburg field today.
P. A. Barthalow scale committee
member, is along the Wyatt-Bingamon
branch of the Western Maryland
Railway today.
Joseph Martin, scale committee
member, and Patrick Buckley, vice
president of sub district <4, are at
\soajjo kuuuj .
More Companies Sign
Five additional coal companies
signed up -with the officials of
sub district 3, district 17, at Grafton,
since yesterday.- They are..as
follows: Big Run Coal Co., Century,
which was signed this morning;
Fhilippi Coal Co., Philip pi; Hiora
i Coal Co.. Hiora; W- S. Arbogast,
Junior; West Junior Coal Co., Junior.
Non-Union Men Quit
According to reports received, at
the Grafton office of the UnitedMinefWorkers
of America, seven"
^Continued on Page Four)
|r *
WANTED
Two lfght housekeeping rooms
1:01ose in. Couple- with'one child
jRent must be reasonable. Write,
Box GF care.Thei West Virginian.
SETTLE
1ELD IN
VIOLENCE STILL
ON INCREASE IN
RAILWAY STRIKE
Railroad Bridges Dynamited
and Trestles Burned
Throughout CountryFOUR
MEN BEATEN
m
Chicago & Alton Railroad
Novy Operating Under Federal
Receivership.
t
(Bjr the Associated Press)
Violence increase on railroads
affected by the shopmen's strifcke
with dynamiting of railroad bridges
near Cincinnati, finding of cannisters
of explosives on tracks near
Alton, 111., beating of four men said
t obe deputy marshals guarding
railroad property at Sedalia, Mo.,
and damaging of Big Pour roundhouse
at Indianapolis by two small
explosions.
Three men are held at Chicago
in connection with an alleged plot
to dynamite fast New York'Central
western express train.
The Chicago & Alton is operating
under rrsceivershio as a result of
federal court action, in which the
road's total indebtedness was
shown to be $14,000,000.
The St. Louis Western (Cotton
Belt) Railway announced three I
wooden trestles, eighteen miles
north of Texarakana. Tex., were
destroyed by fire Shortly before
midnight last night.
Authority WithdrawnWASHINGTON,
Aug. 31.?By a
vote, ot-85 to - 64 the -House today
^tomtlt^odt><>r-?the.'"admlhistnipfoit;
^coaliaistHbutfonblll-Ttieiiirovisibn
under which the President1 would
haye authority to,again put the. act
into effect in future emergency,'
tirely unexpected they rusnea into
the woods and in an instant were
on the two men with drawn pistols.
Phillips did not hold up his
hands and surrender when request
ed to do bo by the county officers.
Instead of firing one of the officers
struck Phillips In the side of the
head with a flash light. Inflicting
a painful: wound.
Today's Raid.s i
Frank Efaw was arrested by
county officers along Drake Run
near Mannington today and brought
to the county' jail "on charges of
having moonshine in his possession.,
Sheriff J. D. Charlton and aj
number of'other'deputies ,made'the
raid oh the Efaw home, where they;
found two 52-gallon barrels of white]
corn meal mash. Efaw is .an'-un-j
usually large man and .is said', to
be almost seven feet tall.
.: While Sheriff Charlton and his
officers were in the , Mannington!
District they made ] another raid at]
a Mannington home and found a-16
'gallon barrel 'of prune' and "elder-1
sherry . .'mash. The owner, of the
mash.wasnot-at'.'hbme and the
cbunty-?bfficers, returned to Eairmont'without
making any arrests^
even after Issuance of his proclamation
declaring that the present
production and transportation emergency
no longer existed.
Seven Bridges Burned
TEXARKANA, Tix., Aug. 31.?
Seven bridges of the St. Louis
Southwestern Railway betweeW
Texarkana and Stamps, ArK., were
burned last night.
officers5esume
moonshine raids!
"tfwo Men Arrested Last N'ghtl
and Another One Captured
Today
flniintv officers resumed their!
campaign against moonshine;
manufacturers and other violators!
of the dry law last night and to-i
day by making a number ol raids'
and arrests in various sections of
the county. Elderberry whiskey,
elderberry mash, and corn meal
mash In large quantities were
found.
A complete still in operation,
which was turning out elderberry
whiskey, was found in a woods on
the Alf "Wood farm in Paw Paw
District when a number of deputy
sheriffs from this city made a raid
there about 11 o'clock last night.
Two men, one by the name of
Stewart and the other by the name
of Phillips, were found at the still
and were arrested and brought to
the.county jail In this. city. . .
The officers found the exact location
of the still and being en
:ment
PHILftC
n : i
Police Refuse to
Take Oles Back to
Market in Patrol
YOtXXGSTOWN. Ohio, Aug.
31.?With a hearing on a charge
of obstructing the sidewalk set
for today, George L. Oles. former
mayor, was also facing the I
prospect of another, hearing on
a similar charge under which he
was arrested for the second time
yesterday. The first arrest was i
made on a warrant sworn out
by one of the official competitors
in the produce business
charging that Oles* had his
goods in front of the other's
establishment, blocking the side- I
walk. The second arrest was
made by police on their own initiative.
Oles yesterday asked
that the patrol wagon take him
back to his market after he had
filed bond, as was done in the
first case, but the heartless police
refused, and the former
mayor had to walk.
Later in the day, Oles won
another battle. Charged by a
I rival market owner with obstructing
the sidewalk*. Oles
conducted his own defense
today and was acquitted. Spirited
tilts enlivened the-proceedings
when Oles'cross-examined
his competitor.
Oles faces a second charge of
the same nature by police yesterday
when he was formally
arrested and taken to police
headquarters in a patrol wagon.
i
NEW ARGUMENTS
ON LIVING WAGE
PRINCIPLE IDE
S3 V J . Wt ..
Union -Statistiw'aiffClaims Jncreases'
Should Be 22
to 34-Per Cent
CHICAGO, Aug. 31?(By the
Associated Press) Pursuing- the
efforts of the United Brotherhood
of Maintenance of Way Employees
and Shop Laborers* Union to base
its pleas for Increased minimum
wages oh a "living; "wage" principle,
W. J. Lauck, union statistician,
today before the Railroad
Labor Board testified that what he
termed the living -wage, if established
in all branches of American
industry, would mean an Increase
in wages of from 22 to 34 per
cent. The lowest range, or 22 per
i cent increase, Mr. Lauck said,
would only raise to an annual
; wage of $1,'600 those workers now
j receiving less than that sum, on
| the basis ot aggregate wage bud!
get In industry ot ?33,000,000,000
| in 1918. A*n average wage of
| $1,600, Mr. Lauck further assert'
ed, would increase the cost of
: living 14 per cent, but he declared
j the increased financial burden
would he offset by other factors.
| As against the $3 3,000,000,0 0 0,'
, which the witness said labor had I
received in wages in 1918, Mr.
I Lauck said capital in that year;
I had received a return ol $28,000,j
000,000.
! "Will you agree that there are
[ 17,000,000 workers in the United
(States?" Attorney Arnson, rep!
resenting' the New York Central
( lines, asked the' witness,
j "Yes." the witness answered.
"Will you agree that one-tenth
I of that number .is employed on
(the railroads?" the lawyer then
asked.
"That ' is . approximately correct,"
Mr. Lauck said.
"Then," Mr. Arnson said, "the
witness* statistics indicated that
the living wage Mr. -Lauck spoke
of would increase wages $11,300,000;000
and that, the increase to
the railroads therefore would
amount to about $1,3 0 0,000,0 0 0."
Mr. Lauck in explaining" how
he had concluded that the in
creased wage which he said
.would be called for by the socalled
living wage_-yould.be compensated
for and" ; said" that the
added financial- burden would be
offset by the increase of American
capital, and that'labor would be
stabilized. ?
"The laboring man would hebetter
housed, better fed and
would naturally be healthier," the
yltness continued. "He would
not lOSe- xtllj' ume^Aium -mo :** y*-xs
and he would be able, to save."
His suggestion that capital
would be increased he explained
by saying that; out of their savings
the employes, would invest
inUndustry." Absences from work
ion account :of sickness" and migration
of labor would be materially
lessened under - the - "living wage"'
Mr. Lauck said.
1
' V'ij."v;; \-ii~
IELPHIA
mmm ai.^H
Ul LIU II l/llw I ILUU
EXPECTED TO SGN
BEFOREDAY ENDS
Washington Officials Confident
of Successful Outcome
of Conference.
PEPPER WILL ASSIST
New Program for Fuel Movement
to Northwest Will Be
Started Next Weeki||?H|
TifA currvr"rn\T a?<
: union officials n e s ot i atlnsl-TyithSsp
the operators' repreaentatiTegln.^
Philadelphia accepted the anthracite
strike settlement . pro'p"6gaja|i
advanced as a result of Friday
nights' conferences faerereactwcq-BPia
ing to advices received today in.
official circles in', the capifeliglM^B
The reports -reachln^^figSBSBB
strengthened hope that' the opeTciiSgjg
tors also would consent to tlie
settlement plan, beforerUhe }vdiejg8
was over. Details of tlie?3Phlladeili^3
phia discussions were no'tirevjealj^a
ed, however, and no official would
go further than to express confidence
in the outcome.
PtHL.ADKL.FHlA, ./ - AUg.^giS&SgH
United States Senator Pepper was
expected to be informed today of
the attitude of the mixievh^anilgojfe^g
erators toward the :';:,sugge8tdonig?|3
made to them in Washington look_
ing to a settlement of the/prbtfaffit^M
ed suspension' Ip.
! Senator Pepper was expected In
!. Philadelphia to receive the replies "
upon .the^ature^dfs^^cf^h depends
on whether a: Join_tyt?hfd5n(?'!^l||?
i miners and operatbra'iy&^awl^HmSHH
WASHINGTON, Au g. 31?Th e
new program for -fuel' morom^nt?
tion the first of next week, it was
announced today by the Central:. .
Coal Committee, which expeCCMgB
that the coal loaded for-moremeiaaKS
to the Grpat LakesS-jwill^^Ss^^
800,000 tons this week, and
1.OOP,000 tons next/;week5ji]BgcgllW
I for the Northwest, officials said^^^
being shipped from Ohio, Pennsylvania.
West Virginia and 'Ken- .
Efforts are being made to.speed
up the lake coal in vlewirotgLQfajgjg
fact that lake navigation does not
close until early Decemhor.iglSi^^^
William W: Potteiv.fuel adinSril^ 'S
strator for Michigan, . appllec?[j|?bk|H
day to the Central Coal Committee
for an addltional.allocaUonS^f
50,00 tons of ocal which. offtCIal^^
said, probably would";bej?Dro vid
(Continued on Page Four)
YOUNGSTOWN STEEL
MILLS REOPENING
YOUXGSTOWN, Ohio, Aug. 31.
?With, the fuel supply slowly but
steadily increasing ~thjea-j|gjgagE})m
furnaces and perhaps Idhbso^fajOy
others will resume operations in
the Youngstown district this
week, giving employment to hundreds
of
nounced at lndependenfcrBteel^S5SBaB
panles* officea today. Tlie^KSaHB
was turned on In one
the Youngstown Sheet &,Tul>o^^^B|
today and another' wlllfflwIlflWBM
tomorrow or Saturday.. '
The Brier Hill- -SteefecSEaaEBSBi
announced- resumption
furnace this,week.' Tim'dn'ereaaiedgg
supply of iron will allow} reEhtiijKjjra
tion of one Bessemer and several
open hearth steel making units by
the lirst of next week.
MRS- CLINE'S BROTHER
HELD ON MURDER CHARGE
VEDGEWATER, N. J./Aug. 31? j
held for the murder of John Berarrested
by Bergen County authorities
today on a chaxgetotiintri^^MjM
Witnesses oft the. slayingraatwrfStw
'Scullion -was present at. the ,CHn<s|?fi
home at the time
pistol -with which the shooting was
andP harbor ^Improvement work

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