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The West Virginian. [volume] (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1914-1974, September 25, 1922, Image 3

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m
Masked Men of Ku Klux Klan
Leave Letter Explaining
I purpose or visit.
NNINGTON. Sept. 26.?
> two robed and hooded figstood
on either side of the
ot the First Presbyterian
:h last night, two others
id In the same strange garb
i silently down the aisle and
!d the pastor, the Rev. J. V.
tz, an envelope containing
n bills and a letter.
b two masked figures stood
ly by while the pastor read
itter aloud, then advanced to
nerlcan flag by the altar and
In turn kissed Its folds and
Id. The four men Immediate- j
it the church, driving away
raiting auto. The letter read:
e come to yuu as rrlend and
er. We believe In the Holy
-T7--.M44HJI iu fcutJ icuuis ui Lilts valine-1
gtlln religion, and knowledgo
sifJesus Christ as the Savior or
jljlm'inlcind. We believe In Just laws
BlSjidi liberty, In the freedom of
speech and press. In a closer rc
k^latlonshlp of pure Americanism,,
[wlp*the upholding of the constltu-|
ration :ot the United States, in preBS
venting mob violence, in free pub 11c
schools as the great bulwark
for the preservation of American!
jjlllde'allsm, In the chastity of the:
r~,home and the protection of pur"!
V Womanhood, and In your crusado
Kfthr christian education. ThereKwore,
we ask you, In the name of
|lfefr.',Klan to accept this token of
Kvfrlendshtp and love, and may the
?Jbleaslngs of Him who directs our
|t3paths attend you, your church,
Bcandtyour future efforts In behalf
BffijGhrlstlan education and higher,
j.lchxiatlan living.
^^'jYours In Christian and Broth-|
oar: eny love,
|&W?.4'THE MANNINOTON KU
4 . KLUX KLAN,
S^rfe^vRealra of West Virginia.
g|;.V,'YESTERDAY, TODAY AND
FOREVER."
| ( At the close of the sermon, the .
ftMBverend Mr. Koontz read the
J wm'raunication again, at the relaMpest
of some of the members,
||JEidf.Btated that due to the stress
Stfmhe momemnt he had neglected
v to thank the donors.
HSp&J^tiope, however," he added,
gl^hat- someone will convey our
*P&^itude to them, for we do np^'weclate
the kindness."
jgSjQlter the Reverend Mr. Koonlz 1
stated that' he wished to extenl '
|^torough the medium of the press
I The Phaeton
s380
F.O.B. DETF
Tea Body Typ
i'.? Itfl
? A t
7 Monroe St.,
rket St C. W. SWIGER. M.nn
illiiT
VE $50 TO PASTOR
ils thanks as well as on behalf
of his congregation for the gift.
The pastor further stated that
from the wording of the communication
he is unable to decide exactly
for what purpose the gift
was made, although he Is of the
opinion that It was meant for the
support of Christian Colleges, as
suggested In the letter. .
This Is the first public appearance
of the Ku Klux Klan In
Mannlngton. A fiery cross was
burned on a hill near the city not
long ago, announcing the presence
of the Klan here, but until
last night no public demonstra
tlon had been made.
The pastor, -when questioned
about the occurrence last night,
said:
"I wish to assure the Mannington
Ku Klux Klan that I do
heartily indorse and commend the
things for which they stand as set
forth In this letter, and I appreciate
their kind personal regard3
and best wishes, and this generous
gift. i
"There has been a difference of
opinion as to the purpose for
which the gift is intended, whether
it Is for the financial campaigi.
now being made by the Presbyterian
Church throughout this
state for the church's educational
institutions, or for other purposes.
I should be glad to receive more
information on this point.
"I extend a cordial invitation
to all members of the Klan to
worship with us in the church
services. May success attend the
Klan in its efforts to uphold
every worthy cause."
DECUfi?
MERELY INSANITY
MANNINGTON, Sept. 25.?"The !
Madness of Sin" was the theme of j
a strong sermon preached by the 1
Rev. J. V. Koontz in the First i
Presbyterian Church last night in 1
which he declared that "all sin is j
insanity, and all wickedness is'
madness." J
The basis of his sermon was the i
parable of the prodigal son. who j
was "beside himself," or insane. I
for a time. "Insanity,' 'the pastor I
declared "is to try to shake off j
Sod: to trv to be independent of I
God; to disregard God."
The sinner is in a condition of
tral
01 Beyond contradictioi
I place in every cona
I automobile construe!
I smoother running
<OIT service, more readU;
under control than a
of price or claims.
These outstanding <
are the result of gr
racy ever realized in
Ppnfr;
Mannington
; . L
ington Representative. Phone IS.
insanity, he said and lie does not
know how he acts. "This Is evidenced
by his stupidity in many
instances."
Declaring that not all Insane people
are in the asylums, the speaker
pointed out that one of the worst
fonps of insanity now extant is
that of "moral Insanity/' which is
found everywhere.
"In moral insanity," he said, pas- ,
slon rules instead of reason. The '
sinner moves without calculating
the consequences of the move. And
as in other forms of insanity, this
madness is connected with strange
delusions. One of these delusions
of the sinner is that he believes or
attempts to believe all others equal- t
ly or more sinful than he." , (
"The madness of sin is proved i
by the sinner's objects of choice ]
or rejection," he declared. "His con- *
versation is often profane, obscene <
and betrays beyond a doubt the t
kind of man he is. And the mad t
sinner is unmindful of the counsel
of friends and loved ones." 1
"The commendable thing about E
the prodigal son," he said, "is that, j
when he 'came to himself,' that is,
when he became sane and realized t
his position, he, to use a common i
expression, 'let no grass grow un- c
der his feet.' when he decided he <
uuftuv iu i uiui u lu jus muier ne
got up and went at once." He j
plead that no time be lost in get- ^
ting b^ck to Christ by those who
have wandered away from Him.
"Side by side with the sin that
exists in your heart and the world
today," the Reverend Mr. Koontz
concluded, "thero is ono remedy,
the only one. It is the blood of Jesus
Christ '
Pithy Paragraphs
From Mannington
Th? undertaker's motto is "Say
it With Flowers."
But West Virginia's slogan this
year will be "Say it with votes."
"Female Sleuth Says Women
Make Best Detectives"?headline.
Every man knows that.
Cook books tell a lot of funny
things. For Instauoe. one bells
How'to devil a tomato.
Poke it with a stick, maybe, or
call it names.
A chiropractic college football
team would be expected to have
good backs.
But a glue factory eleven would
sure have rotten centers.
A mule can't pull while he jo j j
KicKiug?ana neuner can a man.jj.
"The reasonable prices so .'ofCe.i
ndvertiarid ^depend upon who
Judges their reasonableness. a
Autc
' [ I
q, Lincoln occupies first W
ideration of quality in Li
:ion. It is easier riding, V
, sturdier under hard ire
j handled, more flexible
ny other car, regardless y <
elements of superiority T
eatest mechanical accu- y
mntnr r*r rnnafnir+inn JJi
,
al Am
*
i:
Frost
Frank Cootie of 1085 Morgan
town avenue says that
Shinnatbn might tie Eaat Side
at'football, bht they-can't grow
apple treoa up that wav that
equal his la an induatrlous attffnpt
to *fcorat> back" after
! Dame Nature had hung a frost
knockout on her. Last spring
this particular apple tree suf-'
fered, as did all othes, and had
a wealth of bloom killed by
frost. In July, It blossomed
again, and in due course of
time, the apples began to grow
at a surprising rate. Saturday,
Mr. Coogle displayed two cuttings
oft the tree which ha-1
about eleven apples of various
sizes. Mr. Coogle says It he
had Just had a few more warm
days and .nights, bis belated apples
would have ripened yot
this fall In spite of their poor
INN1T0N NOW
FEARS SHINNSTON
Supporters of Team See Little
Hopes for Victory in
Game Next Friday.
MANNINGTON. Sept. 25.?Aftei
he game put up by the Shinnstou
leven against East Side at Fair'
nont Saturday it looks as it the
Mannlngton eleven is going to have
i hard task to eke out a win over
3oach Clark's huskies when the twe
earns meet next Friday afternoon
tt Shinnston.
Mannlngton will have one of the
ightest team* in the history of the
ichool and one with very little ex
perience, while Shinnston has a
leavy and fast team. Add to this
he fact that Shinnston will he play
hg in her own yard, and the task
>f winning looks still more diffi:ult.
Last year in their annu<i! clash
Mannlngton won over Shinnston
12-0. Iu 1920 Mannlngton came oul
>n the long end of a 25-0 score, and
n 1919 Mannlngton was again the
rictor to a tune of 44-0. This year
shinnston has declared that it is
0 be theirs, and that they are go
ng to emerge on the long end ol
he score.
Mannlngton will start Monday on
1 strenuous week of practice and
>reparation for this game, and
icrimnmefl will h? in nrHar nr^n
rally tho entire week. Several can
lidates were absent from las!
veek's drill on account of minon, in
uries, but it is hoped the majority
>f these will be in uniform for to
lay's practice and that no more in
uries will be suffered during the
veek's workout3.
A long drill was held at Black
ihero Park Saturday morning in
vhich most of the candidates were
vorked out. In addition to the
isual training nnd running of Big
lals a long scrimmage was held
or nearly an hour, and the backs
vere drilled in taking out tue ends
or a long time.
While there has been no eleven
ricked as yet that can be called the
earn that will start the game Frl
lay, the following men have shown
he best form: Jones. Prichard, and
tymer on the wings: Hart, Ken[all.
and L. Beall on tackles: Hess,
barker, and C. Gump on guards; C,
tymer and Huey at center, and
ty'on, J. Gump. Magpe. Garner,
Hereon, G. Beall, and Flanigan in
mckfield.,
Barr, a newcomer, looks* better
(very day for a backfield berth,
tnd with his speed and quicknes?
>mo
rWE ARE A PERM
ASSET TO TI
COMMUNIT
?with?
J A esoaelty of forty thoui
j iob> a year?flva thouaanc
ito maintain?over two hui
sand dollars Invested In rt
forty thousand in equip
thirty-five thousand dollar
genuine Ford parts In sto<
Ing ono hundred men, wh<
fled to repair any part of
equipment?from top to i
radiator to battery.
in '
tomo
262 Phc
-. > ;.:, . \&k
| fcutuway ,
| to learn should prove a valuabl
, man before the season is advance
; very far. Several other candidate
with more'seasoning, will make th
above mentioned men step ror
place.
The game scheduled with th
strong Follansbee eleven for N<
vcmber IS was cancelled by tha
team due to the fact that the prii
| cipal and coach last year seerae
! to make out a football scnedule ii
; dependent of each other and coi
sequently had several mixups.
is regretted very much that thi
cancellation occurred, but Coaa
1 Blake has already arranged a gam
; with the Philippi High School teai
to take the - place of the cancole
! one. Reports from Philippr stat
that school will have a strong elei
1 en this year.
| Mannington Personals
Mrs. Beecher McMullen an
Miss Gay Webb were visltiu
' friends in Fairmont SntnrHn
night.
Miss Gay Ammons Webb lei
this morning for Pittsburgh wher
she will enter Duff's Iron Cit
i College for a course in secretai
ial training.
Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Rya
i spent the week-end with relative
i in Fairmont.
S. N. Elliott and family motoi
ed to Fairmont Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. James Wilkin
1 were guests of friends in Fall
mont yesterday.
A. C. Atha was a business vis!
tor in Fairmont today.
FORCE INADEQUATE
ICHANG, China. Sept. 25.?(B
the Associated Press)?The Ame
icang naval force on the Yangtz
River between this port an
Suifu, about 500 miles west i
Szechuen province, is inadequat
, to afford full protection to th
i Americans, it was indicated, as
result of an inspectlion trip u
' that stream, made by 1 Admin
, William W. Phelps of the Unite
i States Navy.
v \
bile C
>ne 629
"wis
Remedy for Racial Strife
Necessarily Slow,
Report Says.
s . '
CHICAGO. Sept 25?(By the Associated
Press.) ? Mutual understanding,
sympathy and patienco
between the white and negro races,
a remedy that necessarily is slow
and which can come completely
only after tho disappearance o.
prejudice, are recommended in th??
report of the coranfission on racial
relations, appointed by former
' Governor Frank 0. Lowden soon
e after the Chicago race riot in July,
d 1919. 1
is Chosen to study means of pree
venting future clashes between the
a two ruPPR morn than throa voaro
ago and to promote a means of bet
e ter understanding, the cotixnisslon
). made fifty-nine recommendations,
it among them the following:
i- "That police and militia work out
d a detailed plau for joint action in
i- the control of race riots; that poi
lice and deputy sheriffs and militia
it be so distributed as adequately to
I? protect both races in white and neh
gro neighborhoods,
e "Negroes are more commonly aril
rested, subject to police identificad
Hon, and convicted than white ofe
fenders. On similar evidence they
ir. generally are held and convicted on
more serious charges and given
longer sentences. We point out that
? these practices and tendencieo aro
8 not only unfair to negroes but
j weaken the machinery of justice
8 and produce misleading statistics
J of negro crime.
d "We recommend that police pay
g particular attention to so-callee.
y "athletic clubs" on the South Side
which we havo found to be a fruitful
source of raco conflict and that
when race conflict arisea or ie imy
minent the members and meeting
.. places of such clubs be searched
for arms and that, if deemed necesa
sary, such clubs be closed." The
!g commission declared such clubs
were a contributing factor to the
.. race riot of July, 1919.
"We recommend that the .most
i, stringent means possible be applied
_ to control the importation, sale ana
possesion of fire arms and other
[. deadly weapons.
"We recommend that the authorities
exercise their powers to condemn
and raze all houses unfit for
y human habitation, enforce health
r- and sanitary laws and regulations
e in the care and upkeep of streets
J and alleys and the collection oi
n rubbish and garbage in areas of
e negro residence, where the cornel
mission haB found these matters'to
n | bo shamefully neglected.
jr?-vve recommendreal in the
il areas where the main part of the
d negro population lives, school buildings,
equipment and teaching forces
Corj
!!orpoi
nlttnlb^.ceriteri
section* not now Adequately provided
with such facilities and" that truant
officers glvq attention to school
attendance by the children of negro
families migrating from the
south.
"There must be more and better
housing to accommodate the great
increase in negro population which
wag. at the rate of 148 per cent from
1910 to 1920. This situation will
bo made worse by methods tending
toward forclblo segregation of exclusion
of negroes." ,
The commlslon in its report, dedared
the members were convinced
'TOat the moral responsibility for
f??ce rioting does not rest upon
(hoodlums alone, but also upon all
icitlzens, white or negro, who sane|
tion force or violence in inter-racial
relations or who do not condemn
jand combat the spirit of racial
i hatred thus expressed."
} The commission membership,
.composed of six white and six nojgro
memhers, was as follows: Edgar
A. Bancroft, William Scott
iBond, Edward Osgood Brown, Harry
Eugene Kelly. Victor F..Lawson,
Julius Roosnwald. representing the
white peoplo; Robert S. Abbott,
George Cleveland Hall, Georgo H.
Jackson, Edward II. Morris, Adalbert
H. Roberts, Lacev Kirk Wit.Hams,
roprcr.cnting the negro people.
Dr. Francis W. Shepardson
for a time acted as chairman and
later was appointed vice chairman.
"Centuries of the negro slavo
trade and of slavery as an institu
tion have created, and nro oftoh
deemed to justify, the deep-seated
prejudices against negroes," declares
the report. "They placed a
stamp upon the relations of the
two races which It will require
many years to erase. Tho memory
of these relations has profoundly
luueciea ana sun aifccts the Indus1
trial, commercial and social liio
of the southern states.
"The negro race must develop,
as all races have developed, from
lower to higher planes of living:
and must base its progress upon
industry, efficiency and moral character.
Training along these linos
and general opportunities for education
are the fundamental needs.
As the problem is national in its
scope and gravity, the solution
must be national.
"Both races need to understand
that their rights and duties are mutual
and equal, and that their interests
in the common good are
T AX I
; Call Jimmy Coad's New Eating
. House.
LOTT AUSTIN
Phone 9291 Wells Hotel
^ Mannlngton
We Clean Kid Slippers
not cheaper
but better
Heinze&Co. v'
A. L. Jepson, Agt !
MANNINGTON
JOFd
a
lffiflVws f* _
With its many
I and even more c
of OA nvivn nnn
I caw a, tub
Sedan is now n
i , world's greatest
I | Terms if desirei
ation
Fairmont, 411
fftiil:r;;iuin
velop wltMn^5?r
J whoso death^ occuri i l-'ririay
noon from the : burial
flflBftVIl
Men nnd women,?whether yon win
ever build yourself up tr your normal,
luit-rtjrht weight depends on the number
of blood-colls In your blood. Theft -J
ell there Is to It Its a scientific taut.
U your blobd-can factory isn't wortt- 5
in* right, you will he run-down, thim 'j
i your blood win be in disorder, mad 1
perhaps your face wlllibe bt-okaB eat M
with pimples, biackheedsUn^lcnqi^l
tlcns. a 8. 8. keeps your blood-cell
factory working fun time. It help*
SI Hulld now blood-cens.-'?^?.Thif way
8. a builds up thin, run-down people.
it puts firm flesh onyOur booeu. it
rounds out your face, arms, neck,
limbs, the whole body. It puts the
"pint?* in your cheeks. It takeo the
hollowness from the eyes/Uuidliw^^H
Father Time by smoothing out wrla- -9
kiss in men and womea.by "plumping"
them up, 8. 8. a is a remarkable
blood-purlflor. While you are guttlig;??l
I plump, your skin eruptions, pimple*
- blackheads, acne,, rheumatism, rash.
I tetter, blotches are being removed fl
I The medicinal Ingredients of 8. 8
I are guaranteed purely -vigrtable.
I a 8. 8. Is sold at an drug stores. In tw?
Tfiaea. Ttie larger alas Is the, metdnaflp
, ^nse??UAi
' -? :1U
lion
I i
JURIS? 11
I I
M III I
lu- ;
1

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