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The West Virginian. [volume] (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1914-1974, October 28, 1922, Image 7

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^ I THE DAILY I
, [ SHORTSTORY |
In Spite of Parents
By n. IRVING KING
John Cartwrlgnt was In lore
i with Emma Townscnd and Emrai
was la love with John. John's
father and mother had selects!
for John's wife tho very wealthy
and Tory charming Clara DonnIson
an orphan, whose guardian
,4 uncle approred the selection, Ilut
Clara on hor part haa selected for
hor husband Richard Watson, a
clerk In her unclo's brokerage office.
Now Mr. and Mrs. Marcus
Townsond, Emmas' parents, wore
both of families possessed of enIfsntal
flnel wnte/sl ?s M/in o re rnfUttnnJ
but of little monoy. The Townsend's'
visiting card bad a prestige
' which was denied to the Townsend
thirty-day notes. The fonci
parents saw with secret satlfafac1
tlon the growing Intimacy be.
Wtwten their daughter and the son
of the wealthy Sylvan us Cartft
wrlght?a misalliance. It is true.
!> but then what could you expect in
> - these leveling days? And Cartwright's
record In Hradstreel's
; was so eminently satisfactory!
^ But when the Townscnds learned
| that John Cartwright had been ort
dered to marry Clara Dennleon
K they rose In aristocratic wrath.
Perish the vulgar Cartwrlghts and
ifyf porish their base monoy! Besides,
they were as good fish in the s?a
as there were in the frying pan.
Emma was ordered not to think
;hl of John Cartwright any more and
-rjL to hold herself in readiness to
W?. marry some one to he picked out
f for her by her parents hereafter.
Emma was a piotty young thing
jf with not much ot her. and John
U was a well enough young man.
k but It must be confessed rather
V commonplace and mightily afraid
W, of his father. So In splto of their
Jv. love and In spite of Clara
Dennlson's lovo for Richard
le^_ Watson and his lovo for her. It In
gj quite posstblo that the parents
!?' ahd a guardian uncle who have
had thlnga thoir own way had it
not been for Clara.
"Uncle," said Clara one evening
as she and her guardian sat
X over their after-dinner coffee, "1
7 have made up my mlud to mnrry
jL that clerk of yours. Richard WntV
son."
Hod a bomb gone off In the
middlo of the dining room table
Mr; Zobulon Donnison would hard ;
' ly have been more stnrtled. The
r worthy broker was of an apprei>
date build and Clara at ftrat feared
sho should have broken It to
him moro gently. Uut ho recover
| . * ed and managed to spiuttor after
a minute: "You aro not. Has he
? asked you? 1 will discharge him
tomorrow."
"Oh yes I am. He has not askk:
" ed me, but he is going to and as
[f to your discharging him I shall
, be twenty-three next month,
' when my proporty is to bo turnrjr
ed over to me. and I guess we will
have enough to sot up housekoopp
leg with," retorted Clara.
> Zobulon from commanding do;
' scondcd to arguing. His nrgu,Yi
. ments were nil perfectly sound.
? 1 Abut what is n sound argument in
* ^tho pathway of young love? Richi
ard. from the changed manner :n
3 which his employer treated him
next morning, surmised something
of what had happened and over
the telephone arranged a meeting
with. Clara.
"What have you been saying *.o
your uncle?" he ashed when they
were seated In a corner of n high|
ly rospeetable tearoom which .had
^ been the scon^ of many of their
UT conferences. Clara told him word
.Jon word what she liad said to he'
.rtnclp. "I was right, wasn't V" she
Jf asked. blushing a little.
p.; 'JYou angel!" cried Richard. "Of
coureo you were right. I would
have asked you long ago If I hadn't
' been so plaguey poor."
I "Oh, bother that said* Clara.
"You'll probably lose your job
' with uncle, but you told me last
week you were going to leave soon
> to go Into that South American
. .scheme anyway. The question Is
what are we going to do for thoae
IflE poor babes in the woods. Emma
Yowsend and John fartwrlght?
John's going to lose mo lor mire
and 1 do so wish lie m'ght get
"Emma. Thore! I have an Men. It
jv-v Just ptruck me. You know that
r.ew company uncie is lorming:
i : He's all wrapped up In it. I'll Infuse
a Httlo matrimony into the
concern! See if I don't." \
That evening Emma and John
had ft dolorous and despairing in;
tervlew which, they agreed, was t-?
Lv be their last. Clara was all smiles
and winsome ways when she met
it her uncle at dinner that night,
k* "Reconciled yet. unkey?" she
laughed as she kissed him. "Of
W course, you aro! I met Dick this
J afternoon and proposed to him.
an dhe accepted mi>, So that'.* off
S rav mind."
"Clara!" exclaimed the broker.
I "T really?such conduct?I don't
I * know what to say to you."
w "Say yes to everything T pro:
pose then, .vou old dear," are.
; ' laughed, and then abruptly changed,
the subject with. "About that
w new company of yours, dneJe?j*
Z any of my money in it? No? Well.
T next month, when I come into my
fortune.. I'll -put some in. I've
studied your prospectus. Tt's n.
' rood investment; There's just one
I eondltion. T want you to put
Uill' U? JUHiir'.im .'"III Iiuuru
| ?f directors. Now stop. Don't interrupt
a lady. It's impolite This
is the idea. Marcus hasn't mue.i
money, but he's atvay6 up In th?>
old Knickerbocker set and there's
lots of money lying around prnctlcally
idle among those old fo.v
fills?'safp' investments nt t per
' cent..?whon they don't keep It u?
a stocking under the bed. You
e -want thoBe old natmvt of downtown
' root* In your list unkoy
How often it is the one expected
Marcus will brlnjr thorn in. It's
kpood advertising."
' Mr dear." said Zebu'on. "there
is something in your Idea. TInw
much will you invest in the com.
pany?"
"That depend" upon whether \
1 can namft the general manager 0r
not."
"Ah. T see. Rifhnrd \\*atcnn, 1
suppose."
. Vvk'UV " t
Sail Codfish I
J There If much fun had at
i the expense of people living on
the ocean aide or Maine and
Massachusetts because of their
liberal use of codfish. Where
is there a dish more appetizing
than "picked up" fish with n
baked potato, done to a turn? j
Or those deliciouH flah balls,
or cakes, but with no tomato
sauce. There is a gfeat difference
between an ordinary
tomato sauce and a good tomato
catsup when served with salt
oodflsh.
1 cup salt codfish
2 cups potatoes
{ 1 tablespoon butter
1 cup rich milk
] Paprika to taste
Soak salt codfish over night J
and cook till tender. Cook po- j
tatoos with jackets on and let !
stand over night.
Shred codfish, peel potatoes
and cut Into small cubes.
' Place butter in sauce pan.
When melted add codfish and
potatoes. 1
Pour over milk, dust with i
( paprika und cook until milk Is I
i absorbed. Add more milk if I
i noeessary. Cook slowly, stir- I
| ring with fork occasionally. j
1 Dcanieons work was cut out for '
him?by Clara. Ho broke to lim
associate in- the formation, of the i
new company. Mr. Sylvanug Cart.-,
wrlght?as gently as he could the j
fact that Clara had, as ho express-1
?d it, "taken the b.t in her teeth" I
and wqb going to marry Dick Wat-;
son. Also ho expatiated upon the ,
value, of Clara's idea?putting tt
forward as his otvn ?with regard i
to Marcus Townsond, and urged |
jCartwrlght to approach Marcus !
'on the subject. As Zebuiou wa<? j
| the dominating factor in the whole !
project Sylvapus "yieldo t. Pomp. 1
ous Marcus Townsond was cold at '
first to save his dignity, hut was j
secretly dolighted. The position j
would add to his porsonal irapor- i
tance?and his income. They gave !
him a couple of slforog in the now
company upon the easiest tcrm|
visible. And. Clara's engagement
jucuig rormany announced, loving
j parents intimated to her that John
ICartwright was a most estimable
young man?and they could nol
think of evading in the way of
their Gear <1i'1c1b hnppinoss.
I "Hang it. said Sylvauus Cartwright
to his wife. "I suppose wo
might as well let that fool boy o?
ours marry the Townscr.d girl,
lie's lost tho Dcnnlson girl and
there's a certain financial value
in this old family stuff after all.
Tutting that turkey cock, Marcus
Townsend ou our board has
brought I dou't know how much
money to our new conoorn."
| FAIRVIEW |
Pictures Please
Much favorable comment has;
hern mado on the class of pictures i
hni- shown In the hfjrh school
?i' I rlum this year. Thursday a]
fail -zed crowd was out to see;
thf Paramount production. "To
Ple.aso Or.e Woman' 'and the Paramount
mngnz ne. All wore plca3?:d.
it is said and many openly voiced
their appreciation of the animate!
cartoon. "Foils at the Circus"
Local movie fans will be given a
iuiu ireui, hclui inns iu mum critics.
next Tuesday night. when thoj
famous Sherlock Holmes story, |
"The Dev.TR Foot" will he shown
lu th0 high school auditorium.
Tills has beon claimed by mo3t
I critics to he the most interesting
and the most difficult of oil
Doyle's lavatories to be solved.
Sherlock, howovcr, solvos thc mystery
in his characteristic way, but
keeps the audience in doubt until
the end of the last Teol. All young
movie fans will be interested in
thfs%two reel comedy which will b^
shown as an added attraction the
same evening. "Snooky's Wild
Oats," is said to bo the best acted
of any of the huraanzee's comedies.
The first show wUl begin at
7:30 o'clock, and all who desire
seats will be requested to be ?
the hall by 7 o'clock us it is likely
that the largest crowd of thP sei'.Hon
will he prosont for tlieae
shows. "Something To Think
About" Will be thc Paramount
product1 on-for the Thursday night
show of next week.
Educational Week
Falrview will devote the week
beginning October 29 to the observance
of Educational Week. Sunday
morning In the St. John's M.
E. Church at Basnettavlllle. the
Rev. John S. Robinson, formerly
district superintendent of th0 Morgnntown
M. E. Confererce. will
deliver an education sermon in
needs. The Rev. I. S. Tyler will
dnllvnv nn curmnn in
the Southern Methodist Church
while the Rev. R. L. Mnness will
speak on the "Relation of the
Church nnd the School" in the
auditorium of the First M. 13.
Church. Sunday evening.
Monday evening at 7:30 o'clock
the ParentB'Teachers' Association
of the local school will give a program:
Tuesday evening, the high
school moving picture manage* |
mcnt will show an educational <
picture; Wednesday night, "West!
Virginia Day" will be observer! by
the school children with .appropriate
exercisos; Thursday night the j
high school moving picture raan-1
agcment'will stage another educa- j
Uonal picture; /Friday afternoon, j
the Ciceronian Literary Society of
jthe local school will give a public i
program, and 'Saturday morning
tho teRChers of Paw Paw District
will assemble in institute in the'
11 TTn tvt?ir>?r TTJr?h Sohnnl Auditorium.
where they will bo addressed by
President \V. D. Yost of tbe local
hoard of education.
Revival at Haught's
The revival mooting which had
been In progress at Haught's
Chapel for two weeks closed l&st
Sunday with flfteon professions.
The pastor. th0 Rev. R. L. Maness
assisted by tbe conference
evangelist the Rev. M. W. Castle,
begnn a series of meetings at
Highland Church near Falrvlcw
and according to an announcemcut
made last ovonlnr. much In- >
terest is being manifested in ttaei*1
services.'
?, %
ADVENTURES <
Bj OLTVK BOBH
Jack Horn
The next place the Twins came
to was the house of Jack Horner.
Jack was standing at his front
door.
"Hello!" said he. when so saw
tho Twins.
"Hollo!" said Nancy and Nick.
'We ore hunting for Mother Goobo's
magic broomstick. Do you know
wliero it is?"
"No." answered Jack. "1 don't
like brooms. 1 only like raisin pie
nnd plum cake and fruit pudding.
Would you like to hare some?'
"Yes, thank you." answered Nancy.
"but we'll have to hurTy noV
and we can't stay- We thought you!
might have the broom to sweep up!
your crumbs."
"Well, as to that.' replied
"I nevpr make any, for I eat all
mino. liut you might ask Toim
Tucker.'
The TwinB thanked him and the
Green Shoes whisked them off to
Tom's house.
^O-NEW
^^B^n^^-a.'ItipAaoss the Wains
Sunday, July 4, 1852.
We. traveled ten miles today,
ptnrtintr nt $ : m. and encamping
'?rk. which f
.9 is thirty foot in
SB! width, and oncamped
on the I
banks of the creek. T^liore Is an1
abundnnco of fish in the stream.
Indian wigwams are strewn along
the bonks of the stream and a number
of the Indians have called to
sec n*. Two or them, dined with
us. Wo amused ourselves by getting
them to shoot at a 5 cent
piece and by a little boy shooting at
small pieces of crackers which he
would cot touch until he hit them.
They would seldom miss.
There came up a heavy enow
storm at 6 p. in. and the ground
was covered two inches deep in
a very short time. This is the first
time we have ever seen it snow
on the fourth day of July.
This Is a day of pleasure, enjoymont
and mirth amongst our
friends In the states, but to the
weary traveler there Is but little
of this to he realized. Our friends
in the stateB are suffering with
heat while wp poor devils are in
a country so cold that we can scarcely
keep warm. Large snow-capped
banks are to he seen on every side.
An unoccunied spectator who
could have seen this beautiful valley
today would have thought it a
singular spectacle?of the women
some were washing, some baking
and others scolding. The hunters
were returning with the spoils and
others preparing to dry the meat,
by building large firoa and placing
the meat on poles and hanging it
over the fire.
At one camp there was fiddling
and dancing, at another the occupants
were engaged in reading the
Bible and poufing over novels. In
an Oregon trail* they were uniting
a young couplo in the holy bonds
of matrimony and in another train
they were paying the last respect*
of deep gratitude to the departed
dead. And that nothing might be
wanting to complete the harmony
of the Bceno a Presbyterian in an
Oregon train was reading a hymn
preparatory to religious worship.
Those who were fiddling and dancing
betook themselves to cards.
This Is but a miniature of thut
great world we left behind us when
we crossed the line which separates
civilized man from the wilderness.
Even hero, notwithstanding,
the co-mingling of good and
DOINGS OF THE DU
j /feOOO MORWIHS,TM.vNA.
( HOW ARE Voo J OH
; \ THIS MORHIH?? j W
11 i?ArAr
S
"r * ' i- . /i'.'.'"!. >' /VV'i
, - - v.
'
OF THE TWINS
KTB BARTON. ?
er Next
As usaal, he was eating brea
and butter.
"Any brooms here?" aa)ted N'u
cy. sticking in hOr bead. "Motbe
Goose has lost hor's and we're afi
er it. The cobwebs are getting b
thick in the sky the sun cai
scaxcoly shine through."
"I'm uot an old woman," growl?
Tommy with his mouth tul
"Wliatta I want with brooms? G
and -Ask Damo Trot or old Molhe
Hubbard or th^ Old Woman Wh
Lives in a Shoe. Mobbo they've go
it."
"1 don't think so.' said Nan03
"Dame Trots cat would lick up he
crumbs. Mother Hubbard has n
crumbs to lick up, and the Old Wc
man in the Shoo has no time t
Sweep.'
Suddenly Tom had an idea. "Yo
might ask on that Rtar over there,
he said. "It's called Mars. and. lot
of people livo there."
(To Be Continued)
(Copyright, 1922.)
DAYS *4^
With Jacobs Jl^yden inlStt jJjlnjSj/
r evil goes 10 show that the likenea
lis a true one.
One hundred yards from nrher
we are encamped Is the grave t
M. L. Boelcy who shot M. Beal o
j the 12th day of June. We suppo*
his company tried him and foun
him guilty and shot him on th
114th day of June as his head eton
bears that date.
1 prepared a speech to be doli>
jerqd this evening hut owing to th
storm and-coldness of tho weathe
concluded not to deliver it.
Monday, July 5, 1852.
We layed up today.
This morning :cn was formed I
lour buckets one inch thick. Th
night vas so cold that for the firs
time since wo have been on th
punas we uiu not station a guari
Wo found peppermint on tli
banks of the creek.
The most of the company sper
the day In fishing and in tho cvi
ning brought in a fine lot. We ar
now reaping the fat of the lane
We have fish every day and gam
In abundance.
Tuesday, July 6, 1852.
Today wo have traveled elghtee
miles. We started at 6:30 a. n
and encamped at 6:30 p. m. Tw
miles brought us to tho summit c
a high hill which was very dtfficui
of ascent being stony and sidelinj
Eight miles over a level countr
brought us to a beautiful fir an
pine grove on the left hand s!d
of the road. Wo are now on th
Boar River Mountains and Bea
River Valley can be seen on ou
left In all Its grandeur. Two mile
brought us to another fir and pin
grove through which- we travelec
This Is the largest scope of tlmbe
we have seen since we left th
states. Four miles.over a county
which we descended all tho wa
brought us to a small stream. Thl
was the moat difficult of aacen
over which we have traveled.
The road that turns to the righ
Is the old road and thp emigrant
In *49 wore obliged to take thet
waggons apart to get them ove
the rocks. Two more miles brougl
11 a (n a enrlnir on V.n rl??1>*
road whore we are encamped.
Tho country over which we trai
jeled is ditferent from any we bav
seen for several hundred miles, th
soil being of a dark cast and pr(
ducing well. It is destined to bi
come a rich agricultural countrj
'There are numerous springs an
| snow banks in the ravines,
j There came up a snow etorm a
j 12 m. and*there were heavy showor
of rain this afternoon. The weathe
is cold and we now begin to see th
ineptitude of not bringing mor
j blankets.
We crossed the mountains whic
separate tho waters of Salt Lak
from those of the Great Colorado c
the west and aro now out of th
Alchall country. Wild sage I
scarce hut strawberries are pier
tiful on the mountains. Wo foun
elders In the valleyB today tor th
first
Wednesday, July 7, 1862.
We traveled twenty miles todaj
FFS
?Til TnTw
I. t6c3 '
IUA7 CUA <H V U
I4C TO^HfVegy ^ p
%
J;'-./. .v.
"jweWted at 7 s. m. and encamp
ad at t'.tO il m. One mile brought
n? to asmanstream and six milea
to tbe rlrer bottom. The road thus
tar via descending. Fire miles
brought n? to Smith's Forks ot
Beer Rlror, where In the third fork
the water came np to our waggon
^ods. This stream Is Tory swill
and there are four breakers at the
crossing. Before crossing the trail
turns to tho right and follows up
the stream until It gets between
two mountains and then strikes dt
rectly across the creek as mentioned
berore.
After leaving these branches tbe
road Is very stony and tho roughest
we have had. Four miles over
n beautiful plain brongbt us to
where tho river and road pass be!
twoen two mountains whlcb arc
stlled the Narrows. Four miles
brought us into camp on the banks
of the river in a beautiful valley.
Lamb caught s fins lot of fish
of a species of whlcb wo do not
iknow the name.
Mosquitoes are troublesome this
evening.
Tho day was quite rainy,
il The soil Is rich and grass Is
good.
I- Thursday, July 8, 1882.
r Today wo traveled sixteen miles.
We started at 7 a. m. and encamp0
ed at 4:30 p. m. SI* miles over a
a good road brought us to tbe forks.
The right follows the bluff, turns
1 to the left and crosses 'a fork ol
1, Bear River and comes Into the loft i
o hand trail four miles from whore
n rhnv eannrnta Wn fnnle U<? l?'?l
o I hand road which is ton miles
t shorter.
Ono mllo brought us to Thomas
r. Fork which we crossed on a bridge.
r The charges were $1 a waggon.
The trail after leaving the river i
leads up a high mountain and down
o a beautiful ravine three miles to
a spring. Bear River on out' left
u sinks upder the mountains and
" comes out in three miles and emps
ties into Bear River.
After leaving tho spring we ascended
a high mountain, the.most
difficult wo have yet traveled over,
It being very long and stoop. Tho
~ trail next leads through a narrow
pnss which is very long and asconds
the mountains again. - Here
Bear River Luke is to be seen on
, tho left in all of its grandour. Its
covers a large scopo of country,
i Three miies brought us to the river
bottom and after descending n
long and steep hill three milc3
brought us into camp on the banks
o of tho river in good grass. Dead
oxen are plentiful on the way side,
u Our California company has
I joined another train and we arc
dj encamped with them this evening
5 for perhaps the last time. There
^|are three families In the train they
lunm jwiuuw.
r*j We have plenty of fish. .
o| The day was pleasant hut the
r(mopqultoes are very troublesome
this evening, more so than at any
former period and are more numer*
ous|
n Friday. July 9, 1852.
c We traveled'seventeen miles to11
day. starting at 6:30 a. m. and en0
camping at 2 p. m. Five miles
' brought us to Talisys Creek which
0 is about thirty feet wide, five more
miles brought us to a small ran. o
t half mile to another, a half mile
u to another and six miles brought
0 us to Indian Creek where we are
' encamped. This stream divides
3 and forms an island and the road
crosses over it. Both banks of the
stream are thirty feet in dopth.
Q The fords are good,
i- The road today was as level ar,
o a floor. The ground between
'f Talisys Creek and the first run Is
t literally covered with grass hop
f. pers and crickets. The grass has
y been all cut off and tho sago bushd
es are stripped of their leaves and
0 baric and tho whole scope of.coun0
try is as barren as tho road. We
* coftlrt not stop without crushing
1 hundreds beneath our feet. This
a surpassed anything I have ever
3 seen, or heard tell of, of tho kind.
I. We started this evening before
r tho train. They passed this eve0
ning.
y
r (
: BELLV1EW
Hunting Miihap
Clarence Hall Is a patient at
? Cook Hospital and Is suffering
e frim a bullet wound received
while hunting near Jolly Town.
f Pa., Thursday. Mr. Hall. 1:. comQ
pany with a party of friends, was
0 going through a tlilck underbrush
when the gun of one of the party
was accldently discharged, tho
\ bullet entering the ankle of Mr.
^ Hall. He was taken Immediately
to the hospital upon his return
. hero. The bullet was located and
^ removed.
- Ladles* Aid Meeting
q The monthly meeting of the
c Ladles' Aid Society of the Highland
Avenue M. E. Church will be
q held in the Sunday school room
o of the church Monday evening,
r The president was asked for a full
e attendance at-this meeting as bUB3
Iness of importance will be plani.
ned for. * /
rl Relative Dies
e Mr. and Mrs. Fred Merrifleld
were called Jo Clarksburg Thursday
morning by a mesage apprls
j iub ui'jui ui uio ueuui 01 iuo lor- r
?^vvL
A Friendl;
iVE TWO BOILED)^- V
?ho a kino ' y Aumstrry
'?*?! ^lT\HR 0urF* y "
f
k-i:.'.. - A B0M36tieE#rs
>. .xvitSwcfc ....:- -tfa; ?tt.-a . ?
GolosiPs
\
The new radio boot has just bei
turned*out from fashion's laboi
lories. This novel bit of footwei
exhibited at the National Shoo V.
hlbition of Chicago, has a numb
of virtues to recommend Jt.
First, it win make the flapp
Hapless, because it has no buckl
to swish pbout 'after the fashion
the well rememberod golosh.'
Then, too, it is very chic, being
hybrid cross between an old-fas
loned rubber and a pair of trot
fishing leggings, with u layer
mer's niece, Mrs. Glen Sllket*. Mr
Silket was 18 years old.
Hallowe'en Party
Members of the Junior Epwor
league, chaperoned by Mrs. Jol
Hupp, held-a Hallowe'en party
the Bocial rooms of the churi
Wednesday evening. About fit
3'oung people were present in
games, contests and Halowe'i
stints wero enjoyed until a su
able hour when refreshments we
served the gueBts.
Serenade
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Putnai
whose marriage was an event
last week and who have recent
returned from their wodding tri
wero given a serenade par
Thursda yevening by a number
their friends, who called ut tl
home of the bride's mother. Mj
Relic Price of Bellview avenu
The callers brought their ov
4 l.r. (l.n
wn* no cessation In the progra
until refreshments were served 1
the newly married pair.
To McCurdysville
Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Berry. M
and Mrs. Ritchie, the Misses *L
retta, Marie'and Cora Eddy, Brtii
Simpson, Russell Eddy and Bru*
Eddy motored to McCtirdysvil
Wednesday evening where tin
attended a Hallowe'en party giv<
at the home of Miss Vomer
mother. Mrs. Margaret Varner.
Masquerade Party
A masquerade party w
given at the home of Dr. and Mr
J. W. Ballard on Bellview avoni
last evening for the inembdrs
the Senior Ladies' Bible Class
the Highland Avenue M. E. Sundi
School. There wa9 a progra
and a social hour with refres
ments for the guests. Mrs. Ballai
will be assisted in entertainlr
and serving by Mrs. James Dul:
of Pennsylvania avenue.
Personal!
Mrs. Elizabeth Harris of Murru
STOMACH TROUBLE!
Indiana Lady Had something LH
Indigestion Until She Took
Slack-Draught, Then
Got Alt Right.
Seymour, Ind.?'Some lime a|
[ had a sick spell, something 111
Indigestion," writes Mrs. Clara Pe
cock, of Route 6, this place,
would get very pick at the stomac
and spit or vomit, especially in tl
mornings.
"Then I began the uae of The
ford's Black-Draught, alter i hi
tried other medicines. The Blac
draught relieved mo moro than an
thing that I took, and 1 got a
r^ght.
MI haven't found anything bett<
than Black-Draught when sufferii
from trouble caused by constlp
tlon. It is easy and sure. Can t
taken In small doses or large i
the case calls for."
When you have sick stomach, 1
digestion, headache, constlpatio:
Dr other disagreeable symptom
take Black-Draugut to help kec
pour system free from poison.
Thedford's Black Draught
nade from purely vegetable ingred
:nts, acts In a gentle, natural wa;
and has no bad after-effects,
may be safely taken by young <
)ia.
Get a package of Black-Draugl
today. Insist on tbe genuim
rhedford's.
y Tip
f here arc.
' " ycg^a. MR. 1
/YES, Bor WHAT
ABOtfT -mE KWO
. y wjro
. . , 'Wij.mji Si
V- ">
p. ' *
Successor
an!lamb's wool nbout the top to
a-! heighten the Russian effect and
ir.imnke for'durability.
Lt-1 Though the fashion calls for the
er, dress being worn outside, the
wearer may, if she prefers, tuck in
er|her petticoat around the hooHopj
oh and be ready for any weather.
of ! ()De mystery remains?why radio
boots?
a! "Perhaps they'll SOS hubby's
ih-jpocketbook-all over the country.'
it-.was the explanation of one matron
of i who was baying a pair.
s.l avenue 'was the guest of friends
| aear Rivesrille Thursday.
| Mrs. Jasper liortug and little son
n?! Roger of West Chester were p!ie?t?i
J"iJj at the homo of Mr. amf Mrs. A. 13.
at' Mooro Thursday.
*l,j Ernest Heaton of Opekiski was
[.,< the guest of relatives on Murray
uj 1 avenue the first of the week.
;n Mrs. Ttolla Tnothman, Mrs. Julia
(t ' Rutherford and a number of other
re | members of the 'Rebecca Lodge
. were at Worthington Thursday to
i attend a social meeting of the orj
der.
Mrs. Rose Fulton, who lias been
I j the guest of her sister. Mrs.W. A.
| Wilson, for the past week has returned
to her homo in Mannlngton.
JJ; Mr. and Mrs. Joe Heed, who
J' I have been visiting relative! here
J j for the past several days, have re*'
| turned to their home at Bridgeport,
011,0
'?i Count the horses in onr corII
ral opposite Moose Home Hai'
loiro'cn.?Adv.
1 QUAI
ill as well aj
m S
h;|^5; rp HE. citstn
ig ik. ^ Good Qualit
ln I?' Pall season-in ?
iy ?| the Store but e\
- ,j| ant, perhaps, is
S{? quantity of iter
ffi . We are carryin
than ever befoi
" 4? reds of garmen
|| mouth array of
H
E?
a- if The immensity
fj- ments?the gr<
? *y things here?m:
d- tj genuine pleasur
fc. uiuivmutti ctixu t
Jj of the newest
modes of the si
sr ia
>* B
;j %i
s| ?Lu
" ?j . "The Best Place 1
It ?{|
, ?S ~
in
Ous Steettng
A class meeting wu held Wed- I
ncsday evening at the church. W
Among the vtsltora present vij I
the Reverend Mr. K?T. Atter the I
services the church orohesfrt prae-. I
tleed wme nee- music for Snnday^ I
Kallosve'en Party '
Mr. end Mrs. Herl Wlleon en- 9
lertnlned e number ot young folks J
at their hornet Wcdnesdey even- I
; inc. Hetrethmonte were served. .1
! Those that were prcient wore lift 9
and Mrt. Ellis Wilsoa and ehluMH
' ron. Georgia. Virginia, and Elea-1
nor. Mrs. Nattle Wilson, James'
1 Morris, Frances Thorne, l.owell X
' Vincent, Edna Wilson, GtotgelH
Wilson, Amy and. Mary- AlliB^I
! Roscoe Hopkins, Steve SupIRa
I George Moult, Leo Barge,- Sir,' aa-J -I
I Mrs. Hall ^Wilson and chlldtigM
w. II. Post ,one ot the 014*19
residents ot Baxter,. Is movlot I
'.to Hlghlawns on the John Phil ill
'lips property. Mr. Porches bjt&njj
, Sunday school sunerfrnendttt'jjKfiM
' Baxter (or twolro Jjpare, \
tuiviTi b uenria WHS Jl TllUOrTO -?!
Tirii Brook Firm WednoedHB
. Worth Alklre and Hilly Wlllar. I
. were in Bailor Wednesday ere:
Willie Bdore wa| 4 visitor a' I
' W. H. ClaytonVreceoUjv. ,**;
Grace Morris and Ethel Wllso, 1
, vlaltM Mrs. Ira Gulpsi Tinrtdli
f Mrs. Harney Morris was a bus! I
; new visitor In Fairmont WadiluS
Mr. and Mrs'. Russell StsyrS^B
i ot KItcstMIo rlalted In BaildWednesday
evening. - ''Hffl
Mr. and Mrs. Ellis WH<Sti?atl I
; ed Mrs. Hari Wilson reoently.^jg
WANTED-One' 'hundreds black 1
horses and ton old'troy marbvBl
' Hallowe'en 7:0O p .m. until 9 p. a
m. Moose Club, Fairmont S:00 t' 5.
p. m.-Daily ask for DomlpOjjfeM
, Have you^orer seen the! Black |
Who Found the Balloon? .1
If you want^the best
CALL JOE ill
Phone 517
sfTITYl
; Quality!!
rapry Osgood's ":%
y prevails this jflpai
'.very section of & . ]
?en more import- llflH
the tremendous &
11s now in stock,
g far more stock j?
e?literally hun- ??
its and a mam- .
of our assortsat
quantity of f?
ikes shopping a P
e tor it assures
exclusive choice
and smartest" ''JSH
. v tjjL
' ' >
|
o Shop, After AD"
y r * I
W.t , WWKtJ u M J ' ?
Jy'lf^ \v f^ln
Jyl
??- | I
i BiK

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