OCR Interpretation


Burlington weekly free press. [volume] (Burlington, Vt.) 1866-1928, September 22, 1910, Image 10

Image and text provided by University of Vermont

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86072143/1910-09-22/ed-1/seq-10/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 10

10
Xim DUItLINGTON FREE PRESS AND TIMES: THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1010.
r.
A
Silver Horde I
a
o
By REX BEACH
COPYUIOMT. 1 000, BY
cnAPTRit ni.
iHR Rlil darted a swift look at
Royd. hut In? fi'll to brooding
again, evidently Insensible to
hr ptosence. At Icuglli lu i
stirred himself to ask:
"Can I hire a guide hereabout? We'll
hnvo to bo trolng on In a day or so."
"Constantlnp will act you one. I
lupposo. oi course, you m im-m me ,
. 4 til ...
ivutmni tass.'
"Avoid 11? Why?" 1
, . , ,1...
"It's. dangerous, and nobody travels.
It except In the direst emergency. It's j
much the shortest route to tho coast. ;
but It has a record of fotue thirty I
deaths. I should ndvlo you to cross
the range farther ent, where the di
vide Is lowpr. The r.inll boat touches
at both places."
On tho following morning Cherry
told Constantino to hllrh up her team
nnd have It waiting when breakfast
was Hnlshod. Then she turned to Km
eron. who came Into the room and
said quietly:
"I have something to show you If
yon will tnl: a short ride with me."
The young linn, Impressed by the
fravliy of her Manner, readily con- ,
rented. Constantino freed the leader,
a'-d they went orr at a mad run. They 1
Hktmtmd over the snow1 with Hip flight ,
of a bird 1
The young man pave himself up to
tl i' unique mid railn r delightful ox-pei-leiu'c
of I e'.ng transported through
an unknown eoun:ry to 1111 unknown
destination by a harming girl of
whom he r.lso knew nothing. j
"Yesterday you seemed to be taken ,
by the tislilng business." she finally
said.
"I certainly was until yon told tne
Ihere were no cannery sites left." .
"There Is one. When I came here '
n year ago the whole river was open,
so on an outside chance I located a
site, the lie:st one available. When
Willis Marsh learned of it lie took up
nil of the remaining places, nnd. al
though at th" time I hnd no Idea what
1 was going to do with my property.
I hung on to It."
"I can't buy your site."
"Nobody linked you to," she smiled.
"I wouldn't sell It to you if you had
fa mf?j,
TOGfCTlTFTt THEY AHCTOPTTD Tllr. IUNH AND
SDKVr.XKI) T1IU bUIIKOU.NDINUS
the money, but if you will build a
cannery on It I'll turn In the ground
for an interest."
Emerson meditated a moment then
replied, "I can't say yes or no. It's
a pretty big proposition $200,000, you
said?"
"Yes It's a big opportunity. Ton
can clean up 10U per cent in a year.
Do you think you could ralso the!
money to build n plant?"
"I might." ho said cautiously.
"At least you enn try?"
"Itut I dou't know anything ibout
the buslucHS'
"I've thought of all that, nnd there's
t way to inii'Ue success certain. I be
lieve you have executive nullity and
.'an handle these men."
"Oh, yes. I've done that sort of
Uilng." Ills broad shoulders went up
is he drew a long breath. "What's
rour plan?"
"There's a man down tho coast,
George Halt, who knows more about
mm
my 'fx
the business than any four people In ' comfortable sometimes, he Is so d d
Kalvilc. He discovered the Kalvlk I moral," Fraser replied Indirectly. "Ho
river, built tho first cannery here and' won't stand for anything oft color,
was Its foreman until he quarreled ; He's a retil square guy, k' Is. tho kind
with Maruli. Halt Isn't the kind ofou rend nbout."
man to ho disciplined, ro, not having j "You didn't answer my questUm,"
enough money to build a cannery, he ' Insisted Cherry.
took his sc iuty capital and started a I Again Fraser evaded the Issue. "Now.
saltory on hlu own account. Marsh , If this Marsh Is going after you in
broke George In u year, ruined him, i earnest this summer why don't you lo
utterly wiped him out. Just an he in-! me stick around until spring und look
tends to wipe cut Insignificant mo. j out your game? I'll drop a monkey
riiinktiiKto recoup HI-, forunos, George
enrao bacic Into camp, but he owns n
valnnblo trap site which Mnrsh and
his colleagues want, and oeforu they
nould give him work they tried to
make him aaUn It to them and con
tract never to go in business on till
own a"count. Naturally George ro-
7usd. Ho's heen Rtarvluif atw for two
jeaih,
"No man dares to furnish food tc
Ueorpe Bait; no man dares to givo
hlro a bed; no cannery wtll let him
work. He has to take a dory to Dutch
?JarUor to get food. He doesn't dire
cave the country and abandon tho
itoter thousands he has Invested In
fuilldlsgi, and every summer when
lUa run nt:t,.s ho comes acrosa tho
ainrshas and slinks about the Knlvlk
thickets like wraith, watching from
m , r in.
....uu. . 1U..0 ,. inranen. nnn ing
to the clank of machinery every bolt
i - ,h ! " ' . wn,r;hlnK hls
eneiule enrich tlitinui. from tint
-'...8.e,40,j,,9)i
e i
Author of "The Spoilcn" and
"Tho Harrier"
H A. P tl It V D HOT HERS
gloaming t.llvor irmy, which bp con
riders tils very own, Ho Is slimmed
like it leper. Pome tlnip I believe hp
will l.lll Vnrsli.'i
'llni-m! one r.ooms to lie forpvpr
- I II ..f ll.lu ttifOll t,,M
I ei usiiij; un- mm "i Mtn
lloyd. who hnd listened Intently.
"The man w'io heals Marsh will
i hn vp done sor.ieihlng.' M'.o paused.
then said deliberately. "And 1 believe
u nr(, )h(i ()n(1 )(, ,f ,
j
atlon I
.... ,i,i,. .1 .... 1 1
A"? . V V . 0 I
III uiouin "I 11 m-cp , 1 i ...
cl)(,rrv ,,.,,,, ,,r Kmer.sun !
, j f.()ln , Mc(, ,.,,,. Tl)1,
'.. ... ... . . ,.,.,.., lt .,,,
n clmnn of snruee. among the liole-i
.of which he tauglid the harness, for
' this team was llkoa pack of wolvev
I ravenous for travel and Intolerant of ,
' the leash !
Together they ascended the b.ink nnd
1 suiveyed the surroundings. Cnerry e:;
' pi.tltitlng upon every feature vl'h th"
fervor of a land agent bent on weav
j lug his spell about a prospective buyer.
1 And In truth she had chosen well, for
1 the conditions seemed Idenl.
I "fve watched you. and I know you
are down on your luck for some rea-
son." the girl said. "You've bron mis
1 east somehow, and you've had the
heart taken out of you. but I'm sure
It's In you to succeed, for you're young
nnd Intelligent, cool and determined
I am giving you this chance to play
the lilsgest game of your life and erase
hi elj'ht short months every trace of
failure. I'm not doing It altogether
unselllshly. for I believe you've been
ent to Knlvlk to work out your own
salvation and mine nnd that of poor
(ieoige Halt, whom you've never seen.
You're going to do this thing, and
you're going to make It win."
Kmerson reached out Impulsively nnd
caught her tiny, mlttened hand. Ills
eyes were shining; his face had lost
the settled look of dejection and was
all aclow with a new dawn of hope.
I'ven ftls shoulders wero lifted and
thrown back as if from some sudden
access of vigor that lightened bis bur
den. "You're right!" be said firmly. "We'll
send for Rait tonlcht."
In the days that followed Cherry
was at Hoyd's elbow constantly, aid
ing him at every turn in his zeal to
acquire a knowledge of the cannery
system. The odd conviction grew upon
her thnt he was working against time,
thnt there was a limit to his period
of action, for be seemed obsessed by
an over growing pnsslon to accomplish
some end within a given time and had
no thought for anything beyond the
engroslng Issue Into which he had
plunged. She was dunifcmnded by his
sr.ddcn transformation and delighted
at tlrst. but later, when she saw that
he regarded her only as n means to
nn end. his cool assumption of leader
ship piqued her and she felt hurt.
Constantino fead been sent for Halt
with instructions to keep on until he
found the fisherman even If the quest
carried him over the range. During
the days of Impatient waiting they oc
cupied their time largely In- reconnol
teriug tho nearest cannery, permission
to go over which Cherry had secured
from the watchman, who was Indebted
to her. Tho man was timid at first,
but Emerson won him over, then pro
ceeded to pump him dry of Informa
tion, as he had done with his hostess.
Frnser looked on In bewilderment
at the change In Emerson
"What have you done to 'Frozen
Annie?" " he asked Cherry on one oc
casion. "You must have fed him a
speed ball, for I never saw a guy
gear up so fast. Why, he was the
darndest crapo hanger I ever met till
you got hlra gingered up. Ho didn't
have no moie spirit than a slek kit
ten." Frasor then eyed tho girl keenly.
"This Is n lonely place for a woman
like you," bo said, "and our mutual
friend ulu't altogether unattractive,
chi"
Cherry's cheeks flamed, but her tone
was Icy. "This Is entirely a business
matter."
"flai-m! I ain't never heard you
touted none as a business woman,"
said the adventurer.
"Have you evor heard me" the col
or faded from the girl's face, aud It
was a trifle drawn "discussed In any
way?'
"You know, Emerson makes me un
wrench In his xmr cas-e or put a spider
in his dumpling, and It's more than
nn even shot that If hltu and I got
to know each other rlfcht well I'd own ,
bin cannery before fall."
Thank you; l can tako care of mj
self." nuid tho girl.
Late one stormy nlght-C'onstantlne
' hud been gone n week -the two men
I whom they were expecting blew In
' through the blinding smother. Rait
I refused rest or (laurlshment until ho
had learned why Cherry hnd sent
I for blm. As briefly as possible she
! outlined the situation. Royd Emerson
bbw a fwge, barrel chesWd creature
whose tremendous muscles bulged be
neath his nondescript garments, whoso
red, upfltaudlng bristle of hair topped
a leather countenance from which
gleamed a pair of tho most violent eyes
Emerson had ever beheld, tho doml
nnnt cxprfiason 0f which was ran.
j Hta voice was hoarse with the echo
of drumming ratlines. He might have
lTed fnrtv Mxtr JBUra. lmt scor
had been given to tho son; Its foaming
violence was In his blond.
As the significance of Cherry's words
tank Into his mind tlio signs of nn tut-
ntve.
.i... m. mil ro it. ,
joy overspread tne usuorninira
v'snT?' nln Ids hairy paws continued
to open ami close ,sl.y
"Do you nieiiti business?" he bellow
ed ut Emerson. "Cm you fight ?"
"Yen."
"This gang won't stop at anything,"
warned Halt.
"Neither will I," afllrnied the other,
with a "wl and a dangerous down
drawing f his lip corners. "I've got
to win. so dou't waste any J lino won
dering hew far I'll go. What I want I
to l..'inv ii If you will Join my entc--j
prise."
"I'll glvj my l'fo to If."
"I niiew you would." flashed Chorr.v.
"And If we d.in't beat Willis Mar-.h.
by glory. I'll kill him!" Halt shouted,
fullv capable of carrying out hi.
threat, f'T his bloodshot eyes were
lit with bitter hatred. Turning to tho
girl, he said:
"Now give 1110 something to eat. I've
been living on dogfish till my belly
la full of hones."
Long after Cherry had gone to bed
she heard the murmur of their voices, j
"It s all arranged, tney nuviseu ner
at the breakfast table. "We leave to
morrow'." "Tomorrow?" she echoed blankly.
"We start In tho morning. We have
no time to waste."
She felt a sudden dread at her heart.
What If they failed and did not re
turn? What If some untoward peril
should overtake them on the outward
trip? It was a hazardous Journey, nnd
(Jeorge Halt was the most reckless
man mi the Herlng coast. Emerson's
next words added to her alarm:
"We'll catch the mall boat at Kat
mnl." "Katmal!" she broke In sharply.
"You said you were going by the Ilium
1111 route." She turned on Halt angri
ly. "You know better than to suggest
such n thing."
"1 didn't suggest lt." salt) Halt. "It's
Mr. Emerson's own Idea; he Insists."
"I shall be dreadfully worried until
I know you are safely ovcr." said the
girl, a new note of wistful tenderness
in her voice.
"Nonsense! We've all taken bigger
risks before."
"Do you know." she began hesitat
ingly. "I've heen thinking that per
haps you'd better uot take up this
enterprise after all."
"Why not?" he asked, with an in
credulous stare. "I thought you were
enthusiastic on the subject."
"I am I believe in the proposition
thoroughly," Cherry limped on. "but
well. I was entirely seltish In getting
you started,-tor It possibly means my
own salvation, but"
"It's my last chance also," Royd
broke In.
"A few dnys ngo you wero n stranger;
now you are a friend," she said stead
ily. "One's likes and dislikes grow
rapidly when tluy are not choked by
convention. I like you too well to see
you do this. You are too good a man
to become the prey of those people.
Remember Oeorge Halt."
"Rait hasn't started yet. For the
first tlmo he Is a real menace to Willis
Marsh."
"Won't you lake my advice and re -
consider?" urged the girl.
"Listen," said the young man "I
came to this country with a definite
purpose In mind, and I had three years
in WHICH to work lt out. I needed
money God, how 1 needed money!
They may talk about the emptiness of
rlehe3 nnd tell you that men labor
not for the 'kill,' but for tho pursuit;
not for the score, but for the contest.
Maybe soino of them do. but with me
It was gold I needed, gold I had to
unve, and 1 uidirt care muen now 1
got it so long as I got It honestly. I
focused every power upon my desire,
but a curso was on me n curse,
nothing less. At first I took misfor
tune philosophically, but when It camo
nnd slept with mo I began to rage at
It. It was terrifying because my time
wns shortening, and the last day of
grace wns rushing toward me.
".lust to show you what luck I play
ed In, at Dawson I found a prospect
that would have made most men rich,
nnd. although such a thing had never
happened In that locality before, lt
pinched out. I tried again and again,
and finally found another mine, only
to be robbed of It by the Canadian
laws In such a manner that there wa
not the fnlntpst hope of my ever re
covering tho property I'finally shifted
from mining to other ventures, and
thu town burned. I awoke In u mid
night blizzard to seo my chance for a
fortune licked up by flames, whllo the
hiss of the water froji tho firemen's
hose seemed directed at me, and the
voice of the crowd sounded llko Jeers.
"I wns among the tlr.st at Nome nnd
staked alongside the discoverers who
undertook to put me In right for once;
but, although the fellows around mo
made fortunes in a day, my ground
was barren and my bedrock swept
clean by that unseen hand which I
alwnys felt, but could never avoid.
Once a broken snowshoo In 'a race
to tho recorder's office lost me a for
tune; at another time n corrupt Judge
plunged me from certainty to despair,
and all tho whllo my time wns grow
ing shorter and I was growli;v poorer.
"Two hours after the Topkuk strlko
was made I drovo past the shaft, but
tho 0110 pnrtuer known to me had gone
to tho cabin to build n lire and t'.;.
other one lied to me, thinking I wns
a stranger. I heard afterward that
lust an 1 drove nway my friend came
v tho door and called after me, but
tho day was bitter, and my cars wero
muffled with fur, whllo tho dry snow
beneath tho runnors shrieked so that
It drowned his cries. Ho chased 1110
for hair a mile to make 1110 rich, but
tho hand of fato lashed my dogs faster
and faster, whllo that hellish screech
ing outdlnned his voice. Six hours
later Topkuk wan history. .You've seen
stampedes you understand.
"My name became a byword and
I caused pooplo to laugh, though they
j shrank from tne, for miners and sail
ors nro equally superstitious. No man
ever had more opportunities thnn I,
and no man was ever so miserably
unfortunate In missing them. In tlmo
I became whipped, utterly without
hope. Yet almost from habit I fought
on nnd on with my ears deaf to the
voices that mocked tne.
"And .something tells tne that I have
left that III omened thine behind at
risr, mm 1 1110 Ki'in 10 iiii
1,111 you rn too inie, Ku-,-emi
r'lierrv. "Vmi unc vmir time was tin
omo tlnK, MBOi..
"j-eruaps. no reuinuM, srnnuK 11110 ,
tbe distances. "That's what ' VI1J j
1 ptoing out to ascertain. 1 mougni 1
might have 11 few days of grace allow
ed 1110. That's why 1 can't quit, now
that you've set 1110 In motion again.
now that you've given me another
chance. That's why we leave tumor-.
row nnd go by way of tho ,
1,;,'1S" I
, j
CIIAPTEn n .
UltlNCl the evening Emerson
left the two other men In the
store, and. seeking Cherry out
in the little parlor, asked her
to play for hhu. Again the blend-1 H(,en hand of the frozen north had lin
ing of their voices brought them leashed its brood of furies, and the
closer, his aloofness wore off. and ho uir rang with their hideous cries,
beenme an .ngrteabte. accomplished There was no question of facing the
companion whose merry wit and boy-, wind, for It was more cruel than the
lib sympathy stirred emotions In the Horce breath of an open furnace sear
glrl that threatened her peace of j ins the tlesh like n llntne.
mind. It was their Inst hour together All the morning the air had hung
before embarking on his perilous Jour-1 in perfect pQlse. but some change of
ney in search of the golden fleece, and' temperature away out ovcr one of tho
his starved affections clamored for rival oceans had unset tho aerostatic
sympnthy. while the Iron In his blood
felt the magnetic propinquity of sex.
For her part, she lay awake far into ken reservoir.
the morning hours, now blissfully j Halt came close to Emerson nnd bel
lloatlng on the current of half formed, lowed Into his ear:
desires, now vaguely fearing some "What shall we do? Roll up In the
dread that clutched her. bedding or run for lt?"
Tho goodbys were brief nnd com-, "How far Is It to timber?"
tnonplacc. There was time for noth-l "Twelve or fifteen miles."
ing more, for the dogs were straining "Let's run for it! We're out of
to be off and the December air bit gnib. anyhow, and this mny last for
fiercely. Rut Cherry cnlled Emerson dnys."
aside and In a rather tremulous voice There was no use of trying to secure
begged him again to consider well this additional clothing from the supply in
enterprise before finally committing the sled, so they abandoned their out
hlmself to it. "If this were nify other tit aud allowed themselves to bo driven
country. If there were any law up hero ahead of the storm, trusting to tho
or any certainty of getting a square ' nntive's sense of direction and keeping
deal I'd never say a word; I'd urge I close together. The dogs were already
you to go the limit. Rut" well drifted over and refused to stir.
He was about to laugh off her fears. Once they had gone a stone's throw
as ho had done before, when the plain- from the sled there was no turning
tlve wrinkle between her brows and ;
"(loonnvl that's my ANSwun."
the forlorn droop of her Hps stayed
him. Without thought of conse
quences nnd prompted largely by his
leanius spirits, ho stooped and. beforo
1 fii10 ooulrt divine his purpose, kissed
her.
"Goodby." he laughed, with dancing
1 eye.s. "That's my answer!" And the
uL..t second he was at the sled. The
.logs leaned nt his shout, nnd the cnvul-
cade wns In motion.
Hut the girl .stood without sound or
gesture, bareheaded under the wintry
sky, a startled, wondering light in her
eyes which did not fade until the men
were lost to view far up the river trail.
-ji,on sUe breathed deeply aiid turned
1 (to tho bouse, oblivions to Constan
tine and the young squaw, who held
tho sick baby up for her Inspection,
The hazards of whiter travel In the
north nre manifold nt best, but the
mmtry which Emerson and bis com-
pnnious had to traverse wns purlieu-
larly perilous owing to the fact that
their course led them over the back-
bone of the great Alnska.rrange. that
H..c,,i.,t.. iL-i...., ..,.. ...I.I..U
Interposes Itself between the hate of
the arctic seas and the tossing wilder
ness of the north Pnclllc.
A week of hard travel found the
party camped In the last fringe of
cottonwood that fronted the glacial
slopes, their number augmented now
by a native from a Russian village
with an unpronounceable name, who,
at the price of an extortlonato bribe,
had ngreed to pllut them through. For
threo dnys they lay Idle, the taut walls
of their tent thiiimmlug to an Inces
sant fusillade of Ice particles that
whirled down ahead of the blast, whllo
Emerson fumed to be gone.
The fourth morning broke still nnd
quiet, but after n careful scrutiny of
the peaks the liidlau shook his bend
und spoke to Rait, who nodded in
agreement.
"What's the inntter?" growled Em
erson. "Why don't we get under way?"
Rut the other replied;
"Not today. Them tips are smok
ing, seo!" Ho Indicated certain gnuzy
utroaniers that flouted like vapor from
tho highest pinnacles. "That's snow,
dry snow, and It shows that tho wind
Is blowing up there. We dassent tncklo
It."
"Do you mean wo must He here wait
ing for an absolutely calm day?"
"Exactly."
"Why, It may be a week!"
"It may bo two of them; then, again,
niv lm all flcht tOIWitrnw,."
"Nonsense! ' Thnt brcefo won't hurt
anybody."
"Breeze!" Halt laughed. "It'e mora
llko n tornado up yonder. No; wo'vo
Just got to take It easy till the right
moment comes nnd then make n dash.
It's thirty miles to tho nearest stick
of timber, and once you get into the
pass you can't stop till you're through.
The nest dawn showed the mount.' In
peaks lltnnrd like clenti cut Ivory
against tho steel blue Fky, nnd as they
crept up through the defiles tho air
was so motionless that the smoke of
their pipes hung nbout their heads,
while the croak of their aoles upon
the dry surface of the snow roused
echoes from the walls on either side.
At tlrst their progress wan rapid, but
In time the drifts grew deeper and
they came to bluffs where they were
forced to notch footholds, unpack their
load and relay it to tho top, then free
tho dogM and haul tho sled up with a
. .. u(ltuj ovcr mnd.
lt was early In the afternoon when j
tM0 iMainn stopped and began test-
,.1.
iiIrt(!g lp.e wli)d, snIJ Halt w)th n
H)n.L) 0f )lpnii Tho native began
t0 chatter excitedly, and as they
stood there u chill draft funned their
cheeks. Mule wisps of snow vapor
began to dance upon the ridges, whisk
ing out of sight as suddenly as they
appeared. They became conscious of
,,,, fll flm .,P,.I1.,,r nml
,IL.y km;W that the cold of Interstellar
space dwelt In thnt ghostly breath
which smote them. Hefore they were
wcj ,nvm-e 0f the ominous slgnlll-
j t.1U)C0 or ihes0 Klgns the storm was
.upon them, swooping through the
chute wherein they stood with rapidly
lucreaslng violence. The terrible un
balance, and the wind tore through
this gap like the torrent below a bro-
back. and. although the wind was be
hind them, progress was difficult, for
they came upon chasms which they
had to avoid; they crossed slippery
slopes where the storm had bared the
hard crust and which their feet re
fused to grip. In such places they
I had to creep on hands and knees, call
ing to oue another for guidance. They
1 were numbed, blinded, choked by the
1 rage of the blizzard; their faces grew
tiff and their lungs froze. At times
they fell and were skidded along
ahead of the blasts. This forced them
to crawl back again, for they dared
not lose their course.
Much tins been written concerning
the red man's physical powers of en
durance, but as a rule no Indian is
the equnl of his white brother, due as
much perhaps to lack of mental force
ns to generauous 01 lusuujciem tmur
Ing nnd Inanition, so it was not sur
prising thnt as the long afternoon
drngged to a close the Aleut guide be
gan to weaken.
Darkness found them staggering on,
supporting him wherever possible. At
length he became unable to guide them
farther, aud Halt, who had once made
the trip, took his place, while the oth
ers dragged the poor creature along nt
the cost of their precious strength.
They had long since lost all track of
time and place, trusting blindly to a
downward course. The hurricane
still harried them with unabated fury,
when all at once they camo to another
bluff where tho ground fell away
abruptly. Without waiting to Investi
gate whether the slope terminated In
I iut-i.-nmi.-i-, uicj ullli- im"'-
" f TCr.-. DWD th0' llou"J,;rod'
i n jlxllfr it. .. ..t.. tl.... n.... tK.-itvi- 1
, ."- ...
hn"-i a 11 111 u iui iui luini uuu.iwii,
only to p'.ungo through a thicket of
willow tops that whipped and stung
them. On they went, now vastly henrt-
cned, over another ridge, down nn-
1 otl,er d0(;llvitJ'. d then Into n grove
V , ,, , , 1
! Xr th treetops told
' 1,10 nnM w,nd al,l,vo' ,
U wns weU nlKu nn ll0,lr b(,foro n,llt
"nd Knwwon succeeded in starting a
. ,lr-'' 'or It was desperate work groping
fur ,,ry bl"nc',s, and they themselves
were on the verge of collapse before tn searc, of the village chief, shaking
the timid blaze anally showed the lts ne;,j R,uj muttering at the mad
two more unfortunate ones huddled to- ( pss 0f these people.
BL'tllcr- Hut It all proved useless. The nn-
Cherry had given Emerson a tlask , tlves would not risk It. Desperate, tho
of liquor before starting, nnd this he throe men titled up a boat themselves
now divided between Fraser nnd the , nn,i resolved to muke tho attempt.
guide, having wisely refused 1t to
them until shelter vns secured. Then
ho melted snow in Halt's tin cup nnd
poured pints of hot water into the pair
until the adventurer begau to rally,
but tho Aleut wua too far gone, and
au hour before tho laggard dnwu came
he died.
Tho day was' well spent when they
struggled Into Katmal and plodded up
to a half rotted log store. A globular
quarter breed Russlun trader took them
tn nnd administered to their most cry
ing needs.
As soon as Emerson was able to
talk he inquired concerning tho mall
boat.
"She called here three days ago,
bound west," said tho trader.
"That's all right. She'll bo back In
about a week, eh?"
"She won't stop coming back."
"What!" Emerson felt himself sick
ening. "No; he won't call here tilt next
month, and then If It's storming she'll
go on to the westward and Innd on her
way back."
"How. long will that bo?"
"Maybe seven or eight weekn."
In his weakened condition the young
man groped for the counter to support
himself. 80 the storm's delay at the
foot of the pnss had undone him!
I'ate, I11 the guise of winter, had un
furled those floating snow banners
from the mountain peaks to thwart
lit tn once more!
Out of consideration for his compan
ions Kmerson did not acquaint thorn
with the evil tidings until tho next
morning; moreover, ho was swallowed
Up In black despair nnd had no heart
loft In him for any further exertion.
Ho had allowed the Russian to show
him to a bod, upon which ho Hung him
self, hnlf dressed, whllo tho others fol
lowed suit.
Kinersou fell Into a deep sleep, and
It was late In the day when he awoke,
every muscle aching, every joint stiff,
every step attended with pain. lie
found his companions up and already
1 breakfasted, ltlg George none the worso
Ior Ids ordeal, while Frasor, bnndnged
and smarting, was his old shrewd t-elf.
"Have you heard about the mull
boat?" asked Emerson.
"No."
"We've uilsicd her."
"What d'you mean?" demanded Rig
George blankly.
"I mean that that storm delayed us
Just long enough to ruin us."
"Why-er-let's wait till the next
trip." offered the ilsherman.
Emerson shook his head. ".She may
not be back here for eight weeks. No!
We're done for."
Halt was like a big boy In distress.
Ills face wrinkled as If lie were about I
to burst Into loud lainelilutlniis. Then
a thought seized I1I111.
"Where In bl.1ze.-1 Is this steamer?"
he cried.
"Out to the westward somewhere."
"Well, she's a mall boat, ain't she?
Then why don't she stop here coming
back? Answer me."
The rotund 1111111 shrugged his fat
shoulders. "Kile's got to call nt I'yak
I bay going east."
Emerson looked up quickly. " Here
Is Uyak bay?"
"Over on Kndiak Island."
"When Is I he boat due at Uyak?"
Emerson asked.
"Most any time Inside of n week."
"How far Is that from here?"
"It ain't so far only nbout fifty
miles." Then, catching the light that
flamed Into the miner's eyes, Petellln
hastened to observe: "Rut you can't
get there. It's across tho straits Shol
Ikof straits."
"What of that! We enn hire a sail
boat and"
"I ain't got any sailboat. I lost my
sloop last year huutlng sea otter."
"We can hire a small boat of some
sort, can't we. and get the natives to
put us across? There must be plenty
of boats here."
"Nothing but skin boats, kyaks and
bldnrkas. you know. Anyhow, you
couldn't cross at this time of year
It's too stormy. These straits Is the
worst piece of water on the coast.
No; you'll have to wait."
Emerson stared hopelessly at the
fire.
The dlshenrtened man started at this
Juncture as If a sudden thought Im
pelled him and followed Halt out Into
Hie cold. He turned dowu the bank to
the creek, however, and made a care
ful examination of all the canoes that
went with the village. Fifteen mln
utes later he had searched out the dis
gruntled fisherman and cried excited
ly: "I've got It! We'll catch that boat
vet!"
"How?" growled the big man sourly.
"There's a large open skin boat, an
oomlak, down on the beach. We'll hire
a crew of Indians to put us across to
j 'jj
"Can't be done." said Hlg George,
Ktlll gruffly. "It's the wrong season.
You know the Shellkof straits Is a bad
place even for steamships at this tlmo
of year. They're like thnt pans up
yonder, only worse."
"Rut It's only fifty miles across,"
"Fifty miles of that kind of water
In an open canoe may be just as bad
as 000 unless you're lucky. And I
nin't noticed nnythlng so darned lucky
about us."
"It's our only chance. Are you
game?"
"Come on," cried Rig George; "let's
litul Petellln!" ,
Thnt worthy uttered a shriek of de
nial. In summer, yes, but now you can't
,t ,. . ' tno Tll0
Mfnlts s always rough, and the
weather Is loo cold to sit all day In
( au omiau; you'd freeze."
Mve 11 chaneo ft,
J "No.no.no! If It comes on to storm
j.oun R0 u, at.u, 'en,,, tidpS are strong;
vou can't SP0 y0Ur course nnd"
' "We'll use a compass. Now, you get
, 0,,ugli men to handle that oomlnk;
t,inl " a reUoW- ' " n"enU U,
reKt...
"But they won't go." declared the
I little fat man. "They know what It
n,can,. Why"-
-ra them In. I'll do tho tnlklng."
, An(, accordingly the storekeeper weut
(TO Hi: CONTINl'HD.)
IUKCIIHK'S HONS.
(Trom the New Haven Times-Leader.)
A preacher's son was nrrested thn
athrr day. He had trar.ssresed tho lnw-i
of Hie State, and probably will be se
viel punished by his fclloumi n.
Much notoriety "ns Riven the case, al
though the crime vns n most ordinary
one, Other men have stolen far lnriter
sums of money, nnd mnny other men hnvo
stood In the shadow of more seveio pun
ishment than awaits this preacher's son.
Other men can commit crimes and tliero
Is 110 special refi'ience made to their
fathers' occupation, but let n preacher's
son moko a mlstnKc and tho sosslpers
nro set Rolnif nt once.
"What can you expect from n preach
er's son?" is so easily nsked by tlune who
feem to expect preachers and their chil
dren to he Inimaeiilate specimens of hu
man helncs, It must not be forKolten that
wMlo your minister Is doliiK n thousand
anfl one thliiKH for the spiritual aud ma
teriel comfort of the members of his con
KretEtlon, on a snlnry that most brlck
InyMH would despise, Ills chlldiun must
J uo4enrll- be noglected to that extent,
ni.il thoy Imvo enrh the nnme tomptntlont
to ftniiiigh' ngMnut that your boy nnd
girl litis.
The lu-xl time it DfrT.fs to you that jn e.-v
rlicrc' diildren nro no tatter than thej
slumlil I, ie.nl over thl- list of prcnc'i.
1 I'm' soli':
Cllvcr Wendell Holmes, author.
Kdwanl Hverett I Into, statesman nn
cut I or.
John Hnneoru, first plcner of the do
rtn 111 1 Ion nf Jtnlcii, nilenrf.
.inniiuim r.MwiiriiF, uirninKinn.
Increase Mather, former president o(
llnrvaiil.
Cotton Mather, nntlinr nnd scholar,
(tcortjo llnnprofl, Matosimin uml his
torian, Lctlls Annsplz. nntiirnlltt.
Henry Clay, staU'siimri nnd orator,
italph Waldo HinriHun, essayist nn4
pnot.
Imvld Diidky Field, Jnrlft
Stephen .t. Field, Justlco fnltcd fitatel
niipi enie ( oilrt.
rjius W. Field, founder of the Atlnn
tie l.nMo company.
.Ichn H. Ourdon, soldier nnd stutemna
Henry Ward Hecher, preacher nnd re-fori'-er.
Hntnuel F. H. Molee, nrtlst nnd Inven
tor. Jniues tiuptell Lowell, author and dlp
Ilitr.M, Francis I'nrUmnn, historian,
tinner t'levelnnil, twice l'lesldent ot tilt
I'nlted State.
Devld J. Drev.-er, former Justice of th
t'lilted Htntes Supreme Court.
Jolinthnn P Dotllver, senator.
Iienry .lnmes, novelist.
IMchnrd Watson (fildcr, editor and
pool.
I.yinnn Abbot, preacher nnd orator
Tli ere are other", too mnny lo pnume
rate, cnonsh to prove that were nil mcn'i
suns tip to the average made by preach-
1 rs' sons there would
t.vernKe.
be a inn. 11 hlshet
iini'tiii.ic.w rn.NTitoi,
or
tub
sisnati;.
(From the New York Sun)
Tli" republican majority op Joint ballo
In the l.T-f.M.-ilne Legislator" was slxty
fcier. tline were eluht demon-.tts and
tc i nt -three republicans In the Senate,
.rid in the lloilfo tlfty-onc democrats
nnd l' repnbll' ans. It the Lcfilslutura
eli-ttml en Monday should be controlled
1 1 the ill mnnrn's. ns now seems assured,
li.e minority in tin- Fnlted Stales Sonata
v. II h" nnrjet "i-tedly Inrrensed by
Mtd.iuir t'luin Mnlne. He will be more ot
n sm-prlfi' thnn even the stmncer from
Mlsuurl was: e refer to the Hon. Will
lam Warner, a republican. .
foe democratic landslide In Maun
prompts nn overhnrllnp of the Sennte lit
end 1111 lefpilry wlu-ilicr there Is dan-'er
or :ho republicans loslns control ot t it
body In the sIMy-serond fonKress, w i li
will meet In December, IMl. The Senate
now stands: Republicans. ",S. demOTiits,
.H (eonntlne th? Kiiccc-ssfir lo tne 'a'!
Hniiiiiel 1. MrHnery of Louisiana), so t
to obtain a majority of one the dem -era
li would have to sain thirteen sents.
Assuming that the Hon.KuKene Hale w M
be succeeded by a democrat, the question
Is what prospect has the Democratic:
party of enrryinc twelve more Leslsla
turcs In Stales whero the successor of
republk-e.n .-enntor Is to be elected at
tile next tes-don
The terms nf twenty-nine senators end
on March 1PU. If the Hon. John W.
Daniel of Virginia, a democrat, had lived
he would have scred until March 3, nil,
and he would undoubtedly have been re
elected or Mi''ccedid by a democrat. Five
of the twenty-nine senators nre demo
crats; Taliaferro of Florida, Rayncr o
.Man-land, Money of Mississippi, Krn.ier
of Tennessee nnd Culberson of Texas. It
nmy be .I'isiimed thnt r.ayner and Cul
lurson v.lll be re-elected and Taliaferro,
Money and Frazler will bo succeeded by
ib 11 ocr..ts. I-.x-Oovri nor X H, Urownrd
has been dn-'en In the prin iry to tako
the : lace .if Senator Tuhnfcrn. of Florida
ami t-l.epresentattve John Sharp W'li
lir.is u 11 su'-ci-ed Senator Money of Miss
issippi, there Is opposition In Tennctsen
to S, nator Frazler, but a democrat, It la
safe to say, will be sent to Washington,
The terms of nenty-four republicans
end 511 .Mnrch 3, Ifdl. Their nnmes. Stntci
and the majority on joint ballot in tin
lin-t I.rKisl.mnvn elected 111 those Statea
appear in the following tabic:
Majority
State Senator Joint liallot
California V
V. Flint
.. CO 11.
..173 R.
.. 4 R.
.. 16 D
... 61 R.
. ira r.
...12-1 n.
Connecticut...
Delaware ....
Indiana
Maine
ias;.Tchuett
Michigan
Mln'ie.-otn..,.
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
M. O. Iiulkeley..
It. A. Du Pont..
A. J. ReverldKe.,
Eugene Hale....,
H. C IxuIkc
J. (V- Harrow...,
. M. E. cinpp w R.
. W. Warner S D,
.T. H. Carter R.
H. J. Hurkett 45 D.
. O. S. Nixon r.
New Jersey John Kean 3:, R,
New York C. M. Depew 57 U,
North Dakota,. J. p. McCumber, ...llfi R
Ohio Charles Dick St R
Pennsylvania... O. T. Oliver H7 R,
Rhode Island... NeNon W. Aldrlch.. S3 K.
''tab O. Sutherland 59 R,
Vermont c. S. Pas-' R.
Washington S. H. llles 119 R.
West Vlrslnla.. N, H. Scott 5 R.
Wisconsin l. M. L' l iillette,. S3 R.
Wjomlnif C. D, Clark. . .. S3 R.
l.'lluiluatlnsr Mann-, the democrats havu
.1 flKhtlUK ebaiu'c, iir betur. to carry tho
I.iRlslaturi s of Delaw.iie, Indiana, Ml
rourl. Monlan 1. N"bi-uUa nnd Ne ul.i in
what other S.au-s may tie Imhtlue expectation-,
nf -uieei-s? Cs'irornln, Con
necticut, Ma-.n,lii:setls. Mlclilgnn Nile.
ncsotn. North Dakota, pennsi inln,
Rhode Isl mil, 1'i.ih, Vermont, Wan. ns
ton. Wisconsin ami Wynmlnc, on aciiut
rf the conditions prevailing In tiio"i
State i.i u-ejl as on account of their nor
nrl republican majorities may nroi.ab'v
be stru !; from the lUt. There remain New
Jer.-ey, New York. Ohio nnd W t ii--Klnla.
It would bo Idle to do thn' 1
Democratic party In thote four Stat
nurses the hope of n land.-ndu that w
give It tho Legislatures and adllt'onal
I'nlted Stales simitars. In the event j
the fiultloii of thnt hop,., nnd allow 'u,
the democrats six scnatcrs In the Sntoi
previously refeired to wh r- th Ir o
reels are nt le-iM flatl'-rlnj, they w 11 el
still be Minrt two votes of 1 ban- majority
In lb" I'lutod States Senate when tha
Sixty-Second Concivss convened. That
would be altogether too close for the com
fort of tepubllcaiiF, and a sunoy of tin
field of conflict should spur them t unite.
and constant effort until flection day to,
avert such an obviously lmpractlcabl
situation.
Tin;
(ip.ATiTrni: ov i:i.di:ui.i
PKori.n
Ones out to whatever helps give theni
eas, comfort nnd strength. Poley Kidney
Pills eim' kidney nnd bladder disease!
promptly, and itlve comfort nnd relief tfl
elderly people. J, W. O'Sulllvan, M
Chinch street; Shnnloy & Kstey, Wlno.
ski. ONH INSTANCE.
Father Politeness costs nothing, sir.
Son I don't know, dad. Tr putthif
"Your obedient servant" on the botloii
of a teUvram -Huston Transcript
rot'M'AlX PtiNS AT I'llUK P1IP.S.

xml | txt