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The Cordova daily times. [volume] (Cordova, Alaska) 1914-1947, November 01, 1917, Image 7

Image and text provided by Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86072239/1917-11-01/ed-1/seq-7/

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TEACH THE TOOTH ^
BRUSH HABIT
- *S
to your children as early as
possible. The sooner they be
gin to care for their teeth the
better for them in many
ways. We shall be glad to
hare you take a look at our
brushes, powders, pastes and
other dental supplies. We
have some especially for
children and they delight in
using them to their great
benefit
Suitable prizes will be of
fered by us to the school
children for their results on
Oral Hygiene.
t
Northern Drug Company
CORDOVA
PAUL BLOEDHORN
JEWELER AND WATCHMAKER
-f
Fall Line of Silverware, Cut Glass, Watches, Clocks, Community and
Roger’s 1847 Tableware, China and Haviland Ware, and everything
in the Jewelry Line. Also Optical Goods. Watch Repair Work Done
promptly and Under Guarantee.
KENDRICK BUILDING FIRST STREET
' ■■■■■' " 1 «
Manhattan Hotel
R. W. FERRELL, Prop.
Electric Lighted. Hot Water. Turkish and Tub
Baths.
OPPOSITE CORDOVA GRILL, CORDOVA, ALASKA.
PHONE 99
_SAVE MONEY!
COME TO THE BARGAIN STORE
And see what we have in the line of workmen’s clothing,
beds, mattresses and canvas goods of all kinds, tents and
shovels, kitchenware, furniture, stoves, etc. We also
( carry a full line of mirrors—plate glass and plain.
i THE NORTHERN BLOCK
First Street
laiiiturj omrjyifijN i Ui
Live Chickens
BEST FRYERS EVER BROUGHT JTO CORDOVA
JOE FRY
FRESH EGGS FOR SALE PHONE 22
Copper River
& Northwestern Ry.
FOUR TRAINS WEEKLY BETWEEN
CHITINA AND KENNECOTT
Leave Cordova, Second Street Depot, on Mon
days, Thursdays and Saturdays.
Leave Chitina for Cordova Sundays, Tuesdays
days, Thursdays and Fridays.
Leave Chitina for Kennecott Sundays, Tues
days and Fridays.
Leave Kennecott for Chitina Mondays, Wednes
days, Thursdays and Saturdays.
The above schedule subject to change with
out notice.
Dining Car in Connection With all Regular
Passenger Trains Between Cordova and Chitina.
Freight received and delivered at Cordova
Wharf from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m., except Sundays.
Tickets on sale at Second Street Depot
• office, one hour, before departure of trains.
CALEB CORSER, W. E. BROWN,
Superintendent. Agt. Cordova Wharf
R. K. BROWN, Jr., Ticket Agent
i .
-----*
REFUGEES NEED
(By Associated Press)
NEW YORK. Nov. J. — Twent)
thousand fatherless children of Ar
menian and Syrian refugees in tbi
Caucasus are in need of immediati
aid to save them from demoralizatioi
and starvation, it was declared hen
today by the Rev. P. W. MacCallum
missionary in Turkey for the Ameri
can board of commissioners for for
eign missions, just returned from re
lief work at Tiflis and vicinity. It
the Caucasus, which he described ai
mountainous, with severe winters, hi
said there are 300,000 Armenian am
Syrian refugees from Turkey, most);
women and children, as the men wen
massacred by the Turks.
"The Turks made three drtvei
against Russia, which brought Into thi
Caucasus, which is Russian, largi
numbers of refugees," he said, “Ti
1914 more than 60,000 Armenians tlm
before the Turkish advance. The nev
year 30,000 more migrated.
"The third drive is known as thi
Alashgert campaign of July, 191f>. Thi
Armenians of the district of Alashgeri
In Turkey were by it compelled to flei
to the Caucasus. It also caused thi
evacuation of the city of Van by thi
Russians. This city had been defend
ed in April and May by the Armeniar
population against a strong Turkist
army. Russian aid had arrived just
in time to save it, and the Turks rar
away, but when the Russians heard ol
the Turkish advance toward Cash
gert, fearing their line of retinal
might be cut off, they evacuated Var
and retreated to the Caucasus, taking
with them all the Armenians and
Syrians there.
I his was by far the larges' influx
of refugees. They were attacked bj
Kurds on the way and 7,000 killed
About 20,000 died of cholera, ‘yphoid
and typhus after reaching Russia. Tht
total number of refugees from Van ami
vicinity was about 200,000. In these
, ways some 300,000 people came to tht
Caucasus in great destitution aftei
losing large numbers, especially o
men, and all their possessions.
“Relief work by the American com
mittee for Armenian and Syrian relie
began in January, 1916, and is stil
going on and growpig tu extent am
importance. The Russian govern men
has helped the refugees generously
having given them up to the prtsen
nearly $10,000,000. This supplied then
with food, paid their rent and made i
possible for 5,000 orphans, but dui
to the financial difficulties of the gov
eminent this aid is now cut off.
"The American committee has glvei
clothing and bedding to 50,000 of thi
most needy refugees, arid has also pro
vided large quantities of tea, sugar
kerosene and fuel, where most needed
During the summer of 1916 the worl
of repatriation was undertaken am
hundreds of farmers were returned t<
their homes in the province of Vai
and supplied with oxen, plows, seei
and so forth. This most promisini
work, however, was interrupted by thi
evacuation of that region by the Hus
sians in August, 1916, and the commit
tee has decided that the time for re
patriation on a large scale will b<
1 only after final victory over the Turk!
| has been won.
/imuiig me ret ugees are compara
lively few men, as more of them thai
of women and children fell in the ntaa
sacres. As a result there are in the
Caucasus today 20,000 fatherless
children in need of immediate aid. O:
th^se the American committee is al
ready helping 5,000 by giving them t
small monthly grant for food in theii
homes.
“Fifteen thousand more appeal foi
similar help, but find no funds art
available at present. The commit
tee is now organizing an orphanage
tor 300 boys in Erivan. Boys of good
intelligence and sound physique will
,be taken in with a view to quick train
ing in trades, farmink and education
These boys will be prepared to art as
leaders along these lines and fitted to
take the place of the artisans, Indus
trial leaders and teachers who were
killed.
the 300,000 refugees in the Cau
casus and the conquered provinces of
Turkey, 250.000 are without employ
ment and dependent on charity. The
committee has begun work in spinning
and weaving, giving employment to
about 4,000, mostly women and girls.
The moral effects of work are very
noticeable. The life of a refugee with
nothing to do but stretch out his hand
for charity is extremely demoralizing
and discouraging. Many of the women
to whom fhe cdmmlttee Is gtvlng wOft
come on foot from places as distant
as ten to thirteen' miles, and say what
they value most is not the money they
.earn, but the mental and spiritual re
lief employment brings them.
"Great gratitude Is expressed for
the aid sent from America. It seems
to them very wonderful that a coun
try so far away and so entirely with
out any political aspirations in those
regions should make such large con
tributions by this disinterested philan
thropy.
"The American committee has at no
time taken up the question of the po
litical future of Armenia, but if the
statesmen who have to deal with this
question after the war secure for the
Armenians and Syrians and other
small nations such a degree of liberty
as will insure safety to life, honor and
property, they will have done more
than justice demands.”
BUTTERFLIES ARE USED
COMBAT CATERPILLAR PLAGUE.

(By Associated Press)
THE HAGUE, Netherlands, Nov. 1.
' Butterfly catching has been con
i vertbd from a schoolboy’s amusement
, int0 a serious business at Sollngeii and
Dusseldorf, in western Germany. The
communal authorities offered a prem
ium ,of 1 pfenning apiece for every
butterfly of the harmful varieties
caught, with the result that the school
children have already handed in 5'0,000
at Solingen and 150,000 at Dusseldorf.
The method was adopted to combat
the consequent caterpillar plague.
—«
MERCHANTS MIDDLE WEST
TO MEET AT SPOKANE.
40 - __ •
(By Associated Press)
SPOKANE, Wash.. Nov. 1—Five
thousand invitations have been sent
to retail merchants in eastern Wash
ington, northern Idaho and western
Montana to attend the Inland Em
pire Retailer’s Convention here.
The visiting merchants will be the
guests of the Retail Trades Bureau of
the local chamber commerce at a
banquet November 21. Mall order
competition, salesmanship, advertis
ing/ market conditions, credit and kln
dred subjects will be discussed at the
convention is announced.
-♦
It Pays to Advertise in the Times
i -—■'•sir--—m
TO TALK ON
; 1
(By Associated Press))
AULT. Colo., Not. 1. — Thomas R.
Marshall, vice-president of the United
States, this afternoon began at Ault
a speaking tour in behalf of the war.
It is to continue until November 22,
and will lead him as far as the Pacific
northwest and back to Butte, Mont.
The vice-president's general subject at
each stopping place will be the same
—“Why America Entered the War and
What We Must Do to Win it," though
he will make digressions to discuss
special phases of the matter of inter
est in the places where he is speak
ing. The itinerary of the tour fol
lows:
November 2—Kemmerer, Wyo.
November 3—Boise, Idaho:
November 8—Aberdeen, Wash.
November 9—Tacoma, Wash.
November 12—Seattle, Wash.
November 13—Walla Walla, Wash.
November 14.—Pomeroy, W’ash.
November 15—Lewiston, Idaho.
November 16—.Moscow, Idaho.
November 17-®~Spokane, Wash.
November 21—Lewiston, Mont.
November 22—Butte, Mont.
' -♦
LIVESTOCK SHOW TO
BE HELD LEWISTON.
LEWISTON, ltjaho, Nov. 1—A so
lid train of livestock exhibits for the
Northwestern Livestock Show to be
held here November 8th to 16th has
been promised by southern Idaho, ac
cording to Paul G. flagstone, the sec
retary. Entries In large numbers
from Montana, Washington and Ore
gon also have been received, he said.
Governor Alexander of Idaho and
his entire staff, the state Agricultur
al Board and the State Veterinary
board have promised to attend the
show and assist in its success.
--—+
Advertise in the Times—It pavs
,'J- ™!2.."J. HSgB. ■
166 TELEPHONE 66 I
We Turn Out Shirts That Are I
-[H SPOTLESS AND I
CLEAN AS THE I
DRIVEN SNOW I
j
j Modern Laundry P
t Mi *
jffl F. A. Jones, Proprietor
j FIRST AVENUE Below AlaskanJJHotel pi
i .. ' ' --J-— *
V. :
V. |
Alaskan Hotel 1
■ ■■ ■" ..—
ROBERT GOTTSCHALK—Proprietors—ART CLONINGER
"The House of Comfort." ^,
THE BEST EQUIPPED HOTEL IN * 1
ALASKA |
Bar and Barber Shop in Connection.
Hot and Cold Water, Electric Bells, / ^
Electric Lights, Steam Heat, Suites j§
H With Bath. |j
{CORDOVA ALASKA I
» .. .■ . - . z. . ... j£.' Az*'*. OZ*-..-' *- . ‘ **U. Sj

! One Visit \
| Will
Make You
A
Ragular Patron
At
Slater’s
Restaurant
\
Private Boxes
I. For
[
Large or Small
Parties
;
CORDOVA
MACHINE WORKS ,
E. R. GARNES, Prop.
Residence Shop
Phone 101-3. Phone 182
Machine Work of all Kinds,
Blacksmithing, General Repair
ing, Horse Shoeing, Oxy Acety
lene Welding and Cutting.
HARMON MACHINERY
BUILDING
Cordova, Alaska.
Out of Town Jobs Given Strict
Attention.
J---a-1" a . _lu
Northwest J
Soda Works •
Manufacturers and ♦
Bottlers *
Soda Water, all Flavors, ♦
Gingerale, *
Root Beer, ♦
Coco Cola. *
Mail Orders Given Prompt ♦
Attention. ♦
Cordova, Alaska. *
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»
LOGGERS, ATTENTION!
We pay $10 per thousand for
spruce logs and $9 for hemlock,
delivered.
CORDOVA MILL & LUMBER
COMPANY
M. C. Thomp#» H. C. Murphy
The MECCA
Thompson & Murphy, Props
Dealers in
WINES, LIQUORS AND
CIGARS
Phone 1§7.
DEIOYTT HT O °* »" Sore tvr.it.
KLSULf
tkialu Orr^a. IViee 35c per doaen; $2.25 per hundred*
_ express prepaid on
(( 4 doseo or more.
They contain the
most deadly com
bination of poison*
know n to science.
Kills VVoiTw.Kuxea
and Sheep - killing
Dogs almost in
stantly and in no
wavinjuresthefur.
Indorsed and re
commended by i ha
U. S. Go? eminent*
Order teds*. FuB
particulars fu rnish
tdlrea an rtqe«*l also catafagusaf tappers' suppliwand
IMdMdNMMaf ‘ < * *
Northwestern itifa&VWCwM>"nS±«.
%

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