OCR Interpretation


The Cordova daily times. [volume] (Cordova, Alaska) 1914-1947, November 09, 1920, Image 1

Image and text provided by Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86072239/1920-11-09/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Cordova Da
(MEMBER OF ASSOCIATED PRESS)
CORDOVA, ALASKA, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1920. _PRICE,TEN CENTS
BASEBALL WAR NOW SEEMS INEVITABLE
BIG DECLINE IN PRICES OF
CLOTHING, FLOUR AND SUGAR
HAS ACTUALLY TAKEN PLACE
CHICAGO. Nov. 9 (by Associated
Press).—Men's clothing for immedi
ate delivery was offered today at
10 to 50 per cent below wholesale
prices asked for goods for spring and
summer delivery. The reduction
shown is 10 to 33 per cent under the
prices of a year ago. Men s shirts
, and similar articles also show greatly
reduced prices since the convention
of the United Ntaional C'.othies.
k ---
CHEAP SUGAR IN NEW YORK
NEW YORK, Nov. 9 (by Associated :
Press).—Sugar dropped today to 6%
cents a pound, a loss of more than 17
cents from the highest quotations last
May.
BIG DROP CLOTHING PRICES
ROCHESTER, N. V., Nov. 9 (by As
sociated Press).—A reduction of one
third in the wholesale price of cloth- J
ing was announced by the largest!
clothing manufacturers here, effective -
from November 1. The reduction ap
plies to suits and overcoats, articles 1
quoted at $33 being redacted by ap
proximately $20.
_,
FLOUR BELOW $10 A BARREL
-MINNEAPOLIS, Nov. 9 (by Asso
4 ciated Press).— Flour prices continue I
the downward slide and have reached
the pre-war level. Patents declined
40 cents to $10 a barrel when sold
^ in ear lots of 98-pound sacks.
For the first time in four years,
flour sold today under $10 a barrel at
the mills. Family Patents were
quoted at $9.65 to $10.
CROPOF CORN
AWAY IN LEAD
OTHER YEARS
* WASHINGTON, Nov. 9 (by Associ
ated Press).—The record corn crop |
for this year exceeds the previous1
largest crop by 75,000,000 bushels, the t
department of agriculture announced
today, its estimate placing the pro-!
duction at 3,199,192,000 bushels.
OAKLAND, Nov. 9 (by Associated
Press). —The power schooner Her
man arrived here today from Nome
▼and reported that the Polar B(
caught in the ice 221! miles north of
Nome off the’ Siberian coast. As soon j
as ice forms in the Arctic straits a |
reindeer relief expedition will be sent
to the Polar Bear. If the relief does
not arrive, those on the Polar Bear,
which has a two months’ supply, can
make their way to Siberia.
NEW PRESIDENT OF
WESTERN RAILWAY
ST. PAUL, Nov. 9 (by Associated
Press).—William F. Turner of Port
land was today elected president of
the Spokane, Portland & Seattle rail
way.
r'
HARDING ENJOYING
VACATION IN TEXAS
POINT ISABEL, Tex., Nov. 9 (by
Associated Press). — President-Elect
Harding began his vacation today ap
parently carefree. A fishing exxiedi
tion and golf composed the plans for
today.
G. 0. P. HAS ONE
MEMPHIS, Tenn., Nov. 9 (by As
sociated Press).---The official canvass
in the Eighth congressional district
gives Lon A. Scott, Republican, a
majority of 637 over Gordon Brown
ing, Democrat. The Tennessee dele
gation in the lower house now stands
five Republicans and five Democrats,
a Republican gain of three.
TENTS WANTED
IN LOS ANGELES
_ i
LOS ANGELES, Nov. 0 (by Asso
ciated Press).—The Los Angeles city
county has telegraphed Secretary
Baker asking that the war department
lend the city 5,000 tents to be used
temporarily as dwellings. The hous
ing situation here is very serious and
hundreds of people are unable to se
cure adequate quarters to live in.
WHITEHORSE EDITOR
DIES OF PARALYSIS
DAWSON, Nov. 9 (by Associated
Press).—A. M. Rousseau, owner and
editor of the Whitehorse Star, died
ihis morning of paralysis. He has
been in the north for twenty years,
and was the brother-in-law of E. J.
W'hite, head of the Alaska publicity
bureau.
WASHINGTON, Nov. 9 (by Associ
ated Press). — Orders were tele
graphed today to recruiting stations
to recruit the Second division to full
strength immediately. No explanation
was given for the order.
BANKERS TO FINANCE
LIVESTOCK INDUSTRY
CHICAGO, Nov. 9 (by Associated
Press). — Bankers of Chicago and
other cities met here today to com
plete arrangements for a $30,000,000
pool to help finance the livestock In
dustry.
ALLEGED CONSPIRATORS
ACQUITTED AT ATHENS
ATHENS, Nov. 9 (by Associated
rPess).—Fifteen persons accused of
being implicated in the attempt to
assassinate Premier Venizelos in
Paris, and also of conspiracy to over
throw the government, have been ac
quitted.
SECRETARY COLBY TO
GO TO SOUTH AMERICA
WASHINGTON, Nov. ft (by Associ
ated Press).—Secretary of State
Colby will leave for South America
within two weeks on an official visit
if President Wilson approves of the
proposed trip.
The Cordova Republican Club has
given its unanimous endorsement
to George C. Hazelet for governor
of Alaska. This action was taken
at a special meeting, held last
night, in the Eagle lodge room, and
which was largely attended by the
members. President Nathanael
Green was in the chair and after
stating the object of the meeting
James L. Galen, chairman of the
local campaign committee, tool; the
floor and in a masterly speech, set
ting forth the qualifications of Cor
dova's candidate and giving the
best of reasons why he should be
selected as Alaska’s chief executive,
he presented the name of George
C. Hazelt for govrnor of Alaska. Sec
onding speeches were also made by
Dr. \V. H. Chase, F. F. Foster, George
Dooley and Malcolm Brock, who
paid a glowing tribute to the quali
fications of our townsman and urged
that every member of the club get
busy and not rest content until the
appointment had been made and
confirmed.
In presenting the name of Mr.
Hazelet for governor, Mr. Galen
said:
Mr. President. Ladies and Gentle
men :
A little over a year ago, to be
exact on September 19, 1919, we or
ganized this Republican Club.
Our idea in organizing at that
time wts to line up and to harmon
ize all Republicans in this section
so that by united action we might
be able to assist in the accomplish
ment of the magnificent victory,
both nationally and territorially, wit
nessed on Tuesday last.
How well we have succeeded is
eloquently evidenced by the vote,
cast on April 27 in the primary elec
tion, by which we reaped the first
benefits of organization, and, again
on November 2, when we returned
■ flattering majority for every Re
publican candidate from delegate to
congress to road commissioner in the
face of no trifling opposition I can
assure you.
So in this respect we have been
functioning most beautifully and suc
cessfully.
Another important purpose in or
■ nizing this club was that w? might
be in a favorable position to par
ticipate in and share the fruits of
victory by directing party policies
and appointments in the territory.
Mr. President, we have reached
that stage tonight, and, since we
have contributed so bountifully to
the success of the party I for one do
not believe in sleeping upon our
rights.
Some may have the opinion and
urge that action at this time is hur
ried and inadvisable since most of
the offices, both territorial and di
visional, do not become available by
expiration of their respective terms
until about one year hence. I fully
agree that this argument does apply
with respect to divisional offices
such ;:s: judges, marshals and so on.
!>',n it does not apply to territorial
offices and particularly to (hat of
governor. As it very often happens,
and such practice might well uni
formly obtain, that when a governor,
who is the chief executive and
spokesman for all the people of the
territory, finds that he is not in
accord with them and the new ad
ministration he resigns forthwith.
Consequently this office may become
vacant any time after the -lib of
March next.
Therefore I am going to propose
that we go after this, the biggest
job in Alaska, because we have
gained the right to ask for it and
because, in my opinion, we have
tire biggest and best man in' Alaska
to fill it. His residence in Alaska
for upwards of twenty years, his ex
celent business judgment, tact, affa
bility. broad mindedness, and hon
esty and integrity beyond question
are but a few of his qualifications.
The vote of confidence accorded
him by the electors of the territory
in the primary election last spring
and particularly the all but unani
mous vote of his home town and
vicinity, the manner in which he
executed the trust at that time con
ferred. and, finally, his tireless ef
forts and political sagacity in bring
ing all Republicans to work in har
mony in one big happy family, thus
r.iaKing possiuie tne victory recently
achieved, designate him as the logi
cal candidate for this high office.
Mr. President. I have the honor to
move, and I'll assure you I deem
it a great honor, that the Cordova
Republican Club, in this meeting as
sembeld, endorse for governor of the
territory of Alaska, our fellow towns
man and respected and worthy citi
zen. Mr. George C. Hazelet.
After the club had unanimously
endorsed the candidacy of Mr.
Hazelet tell following resolution
presented by Thos. S. Scott was
passed:
M'he reap, the Cordova Republican
Club has on this day unanimously
endorsed Mr. Geo. C. Hazelet for
governor of the territory of Alaska,
believing him to be a candidate
who embodies and represents all the
qualifications most desirable for that
high office and one whom all sec
tions may feel proud to support, now
therefore, be it
Resolved, that the Cordova Re
publican Club earnestly asks the co
operation of the Territorial Republi
can Organization and all Republican
Clubs throughout the territory In
the movement to secure the appoint
ment of Geo. C. Hazelet for governor
of the territory of Alaska.
Be it further resolved that a copy
of these resolutions be sent to the
delegate-elect to congress, the ter
ritorial national committeeman, mem
bers of the territorial Republican
Organization, and to each Republi
can Club throughout the territory.
MAJOR LEAGUES BROKEN UP
AND TWELVE CLUB CIRCUIT
FORMED WITH IW LEADERS
DEBS POLLS MORE VOTES
THAN PROHIBITIONIST
SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 8 (by As
sociated Press).—Eugene V. Debs, the
Socialist nominee, polled more votes
in California than did Watson, the
Prohibition candidate. Debs received
50.S02 to 18,274 for Watson.
DOCUMENTS OF
LONDON, Nov. 9 (by Associated
Press).—Valuable documents and
diaries belonging to Roald Amundsen,
the Arctic explorer, were stolen yes
tesday from Capt. Hansen of the
steamer Maude, according to r, Chris
tiania dispatch to the Exchange Tele
graph. Three arrests were made but.
•f
there seems little prospects of recov
ering the stolen documents.
HEAVY PATROL
IS PLACED ON
WALL STREET

NEW YORK, Nov. 9 (by Associated
Press).—Twenty-five additional patrol-i
men were distributed throughout the
financial district today to guard finan-;
cial institutions because ot threats al-j
leged to have been made recently at
a secret meeting of radicals, against
Wall street institutions and their de-!
tectives.
I
ENFORCEMENT OFFICER
NOT TO RE PROSECUTED
WINDSOR, Ont., Nov. 9 (by Asso
dated Press).—Rev. J. O. L. Sprack
lin. the prohibition enforcement offi
eer who during a raid Sunday shot
and killed Beverly Trumble, an inn
keeper, will not be prosecuted in the
provincial courts, the crown attorney
said today.
DUCHESS CONSUELLO
FINALLY GETS DIVORCE
FROM TITLED HUSBAND
LONDON. Nov. 9 (by Associated
Press). -The Duchess of Marlborough,
formerly Consuelo Vanderbilt, has
been awarded a divorce decree from
the Duke of Marlborough on charges
of desertion and misconduct. These
were denied until the evidence was
taken.
The duke occupied a front seat in
the court room. A detective testified
that the duke occupied a room in a
Paris hotel with an unnamed women
“24 or 25 years old.”
Unless other proceedings are insti
tuted by the duke, the decree will be
come absolute at the end of six
months.
CHICAGO, Nov. 9 (by Associated
Press).—The National and American
baseball leagues have broken up and
a twelve-club league organized by the
meeting of eleven major league repre
sentatives, the twelfth club to be
named later.
Judge K. M. Landis of the federal
coifrt in Chicago was named chairman
of the civilian tribunal which will
have absolute control over organized
baseball. The two other members of
the commission will be named later.
The reorganization plan will be laid
before the minor league meeting at
Kansas City. One member of the
tribunal is to be named by the minors.
OPPOSITION IN MINOR LEAGUES
KANSAS CITY, Nov. 9 (by Associ
ated Press). First arrivals for the
minor league baseball meeting de
clared the minors would not accept
the proposal for new control of base
ball by a civilian tribunal. The
view was expressed that the minor
clubs were able to govern themselves.
President Ban Johnson of the
American league and live of the club
owners of that league today declared
war to the finish against the forma
tion of the new twelve-club league.
Johnson said crabs will be established
in Chicago, Boston and New York to
take the places of the clubs joining
the new National league.
“We are prepared to give them all
the battle they want. The American
league is going on about its own busi
ness and will have clubs in the eight
c'ties which have composed the cir
cuit. for years," Johnson declared.
"War is the best cleanser, and I’m
for it as I believe it will clean up
baseball. What the game really needs
is to be cleansed of some undesirable
owners who have been a detriment
because they allowed gambling in the
hall parks."
U.S. CRUISER IS
GROUNDED HIGH
AT CARTAGENA
WASHINGTON. Nov. 9 (by Associ
ated Press). Tlie protected cruiser
Cleveland, attached to the squadron
on duty in Latin American waters, is
grounded in the Cartagena, Colombia,
harbor. The ship is undamaged but
attempts to pull her off have failed.
Lighters and tugs have been ordered
to proceed from the Mare Island navy
rd at San Francisco to ilie relief of
the cruiser.
NAVAL SITES
PUGET SOUND
SEATTLE. Nov. 9 (by Associated
Press).—The joint congressional com
mittee investigating proposed naval
sites on the Pacific coast arrived here
today and began a three days’ inspec
tion of the naval defenses of Puget
sound. It is expected the committee
will recommended changes for needed
Improvements and enlargements.

xml | txt