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The Cordova daily times. [volume] (Cordova, Alaska) 1914-1947, November 24, 1920, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86072239/1920-11-24/ed-1/seq-3/

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PROFESSIONAL
DR. W. W. COUNCIL
PHYSICIAN and SURGEON
Office and Residence, Cordova
General Hospital (Ostrander
Building).
Phones—Residence, 115; Office, 182
' DR. W. H. CHASE
Physician and Surgeon
Lathrop Building
Phone 9
Established Cordova 1908
DRCORADAGGETT
SPECIALIST
DENTAL PROPHYLAXIS
PYORRHEA X-RAY
OFFICES WITH
DR. CHARLES DAGGETT
--*
DR. CHARLES DAGGETT
LATHROP BLDG. PHONE 200
CORDOVA, ALASKA
Prophylaxis X-Ray
DR. VON ZESCH
Dentist
ADAMS BUILDING
DR. H. A.BLYTH
DENTIST
Crown and Bridge Work a Specialty
NORTHERN HOTEL
Phone 71
• -—-4
DR. LOUIS H. WOLFE
DENTIST
KENNECOTT, ALASKA
♦ --- A
1 D0N0H0E & DIMOND
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW
i
Office*:
CORDOVA and VALDEZ
FRANK H. FOSTER
attorney-at-law
I _
i ROOM 1, OSTRANDER HUD DING
♦----<
E. F. MEDLEY
attorney and counsellor
AT LAW
Room 1, Adams mock
CORDOVA. ALASKA
'
D. C. FAIRMAN
TEACHER OF PIANO
I WILLIAM A. HESSE
U. S. MINERAL SURVEYOR
Uedford-McNeill Code
| Cordova, Alaska
* HUBBELL AND WALLER
CIVIL ENGINEERS
U S Mineral and Deputy Surveyors
Fish Trap Surveyors
1105 L. C. Smith Bldg., Seattle.
*Franlc A. Metcalf Raymond F. Grefe
METCALF AND GREFE
Civil and Mining Engineers
U. S. Mineral Surveyors
JUNEAU.ALASKA
OIL BONDS
SURETY AND FIDELITY BONDS
LIFE INSURANCE
ACCIDENT INSURANCE
THOS. S. SCOTT
Machine Works
Cordova
E. R. GARNES, Proprietor
Residence Phone 101-3
Shop Phone 182
Machine Work of All Kinds.
Blacksmithing, General Repair
ing, Horse Shoeing, Oxy-Acety
lene Welding and Cutting.
Automobiles
Repaired
Office and Shop: City Dock
CORDOVA, ALASKA
Out of Town Jobs Given Strict
Attention
j_H. B. WOLKING & CO.
Licensed
UNDERTAKERS
And
embalmers
Phene Ml—•
®M522*>
Valley of the Meuse in Belgium.
ASKED to pluck the prettiest
flowers of our I’elgian folk
lore, I stand blinded and hesi
tate. Wljat shall 1 choose in
* :his bouquet, over rich in its mingling
3f brilliant colors and tendin' lines?
Shall it be pearls of sacred mistletoe
’alien beneath the Druid’s knife; lilies
xrown in the s’hadow of convents and
nonasicries; roses reddened with the
)lood of tourneys and the carnage of
> Hattie; or, perchance, pale daisies of
he fields sprung up unheeded amid
lie cow pasture? All equally are
.irecious, writes Louis Lngasse do
Loeht in the London 'rimes. Daugh
;ms of a fertile land seared in the
•owrse of ages by storms let loose
> from the four corners of the earth,
tre they not the expression, the poet
•y. the sap of love and hate, the very
'Old, in a word, of a people fashioned
»v martial blows and bathed in the
sunshine of idealism?
Every Belgian is thrilled by the
past, it is liis staff and broad of
life. Hence liis love of cavalcades,
joyous entries and processions, the
ever recurring delight^,of most of our
villages. Great tasie is often display
ed in tin' ordering of these parades, in
the building of the triumph—to which j
Rubens and .lordio ns did not scorn to
1 devote their talent. And it is as if ;
the figures of legend and history which |
pass through our streets had stepped :
down from ilie canvas of old master
pieces to lie closer to the caresses of j
i he crowds.
Sometimes the ceremony represents
hui an episode, a scene of chivalry or
of mystery from (lie middle ages. In
Bruges, suddenly awakened from its
melancholy miracle of the holy blood,
the triumphal escort of a prince eon
seerated to the conquest of the holy
land moves in a rolling stream of
glistening steel amid the glamor of
1 rich silks and precious broideries, the
clashing of arms and the embruzen
peal of trumpets.
Supreme Drama of All Time.
At Humes, on tile last Sunday in
July, tlie procession of ‘‘penitents” re
enacts the supreme drama of all time.
For weeks the city prepares for it;
The actors’ parts are* more coveted
than public honors; some are jealous
ly guarded as hereditary rights.
Through the dense crowd, pressing
ever closer and closer, tin* revered lig
ures pays iii procession. And (lie
i Christ appears, weighted down by liis
cross, a living and. staggering Christ,
scourged till the blood runs from Imp,
A shiver of religious fervor passes
DVer I lie faithful. “.Mercy!” a penitent
cries aloud in pain. Every window is
a garden of tapers, caudles and lights
whose thirties flicker in the wind blow
ing from the sea. Sacred chants min
gle witli the piping of reeds, the.noise
of rattles and the winding of horns.
The crowd sobs apd sways and wrings
its hands and falls into prayer as,
following the (Tucilied one, the peni
tents pass. The men in sackcloth and
the women closely veiled do penance,
and I heir naked, torn foci bleed on ilie
stones of Ilie road, i’ercbanco beneath
their cloaks of burlap noble ladies,
whose llaxen hair and while bod es
arc the love treasures of this sensu
ous and mys’tic Flanders, are paying
tin* ransom of a kiss!
Motts, the home of the guardian
saint of the British army, is the the
ater every year of the famous Eume
eon display which ends rlie procession
of Ste. YVoudru. At midday to the
tolling of the great hell, otherwise
beard only ns a war alarm, St. George
gives buttle to (lie dragon. After a
deadly combat, the dragon, according
to rile, crashes down in the dust, shot
through the nostrils, and the devils
are chastised by the brave followers
of the victorious knight. Before en
tering the lists the fnhled “boast”
Hays the crowd with mighty blows of
his tail. The people of Mons believe
►hat a blow from the tail orlmrf
good look. Wlmt matter if it hurls';
On occasion both municipal oflieinli
and clergy take part in tin; festivities,
and frequently our ancient customs
put them to uncouth tests. .Each yen
a procession leaves Grammont and
goes to tlie Oudcnberg. Prayers are
said in public, after which loaves and
fishes are distributed to the crowd
and the burgomaster offers the priest
a silver loving cup filled with white
wine in which tiny minnows are swim
ming. A wry face, a grave gulp and
the career of a little fish ends in the
pastoral stomach. And so it goes till
every notabJe and every minnow lias
faced tin1 same ordeal. At nightfall
huge hotwires upon the surrounding
hilltops light up the countryside. 'TIs
said that these customs date back to
the worship of Ceres.
“Tiirte Entwined Ladies.”
The story, uf the warlike virtues and
tragic deaths of the “three entwined
ladies” is another jewel of Meuse folk
lore. in 1554 Bouvignes is furiously
attacked1 by the king of France. The
town is taken, but the valiant citadel
of Crevceoeur still holds out. Assault
after assault is repulsed. Alas, the
defenders are now a bare hundred, in
cluding old men, women and children
then fifty, then ten—at last three
young' and beautiful women. “The
Ladies of CTevecoeur" still hold out
desperately. They are about to be
taken. Bather than serve at a king’s
feast, they climb to the topmost ram
parts and entwining their arms throw
themselves into the Meuse, forever
more the gentle guardian of their
womanly honor. Until this day the
stream continues to weave its liquid
blue shroud over their white bodies.
Doubtless the folklore of Flanders
differs from the Walloon traditions
and customs. The latter are light and
gay, the former rich in color and full
of quaint beliefs. Tlie Flemish ker
inesses begin by prayer and the solemn
warnings of priests who thunder fy'll)
their pulpits—“Hell, mind ye, opens
beneath the feet of blond maidens who
trip the merry dance: beware for mis
fortune will surely visit the stable and
weigh upon the head of the brawny
yeoman too easily tempted by foaming
beer and the smiles of women.” But
the last words of tlie priestly warning
have scarce died away before the fes
live board creaks beneath the good
tilings of this earth, and ardent youth
feels that it lives. As evening falls on
the gay Sundays of August, ribald
songs and old-time dances end these
village fetes worthy of a liuhens or
| a Teniers.
_
WHITTLING OUT OF FASHION
Decline of Ancient and Honorable
Pastime So Marked as to Have
Been Noted.
Come to think of it, there is some
truth in Ihe statement that whittling
ns n lazy or tired man's pastime, is
going out of existence. A storekeep
cr stt.vs: “I used to set it box out iit
front of the store for the hoys to set
on, and tlie next day titer'd lie nothin'
left of liie box ’eeptin’ a lot of whit
| ilin’s littered tike around the side
walk. Hut now a box will last jest
nltout nil summer . . . No, whit
tlin’ ain't what It were!" At a rail
way station the agent remarked llistt
whereas a waiting-room bench had a
shorter life in the older days “than
a two-bit harmonica,” the present
benches in the men’s waiting room
over which he had jurisdiction had
lasted well on to 18 months. Ami
at post office, blacksmith shop, IIver\
stable and elsewhere the crowd no
longer amoves itself with knife and
soft wood. Perhaps men are too busy
The storekeeper referred to above lias
another theory. He says: ‘‘They're
too cussed lazy today to whet their
i Jack knives.”— Exchange.
NEWSY LETTER
ABOUT ALASKA
SEATTLE, Nov. 24.—<( Special to
the Ilaily Times.)—News of a prom
ising gold placer strike in the Chan
dalar district, approximately 100
miles helow Fort Yukon, was given
out by Allen Crane of that district,
at the Alaska bureau of the Cham
ber of Commerce.
Mr. Crane has come here on busi
ness and to get the assistance of th?
Alaska bureau of the chamber in the
effort being made to have the gov
ernment extend the tnail service
from Fort Yukon, where there is a
bi-monthly mail service, from Cir
cle to Beaver city, which is the trad
ing post and center of the Chan
dalar mining district.
He reports that the richest pay
dirt in that district has yielded $275
a squar foot, but even with this
good strike transportation costs and
high provisions are holding the pio
neers of that section from the
wealth they are working so hard
for. He says they are forced to pay
$90 a ton as a general rule for
freight, shipped from Seattle to a
point 1500 miles up the Yukon where
they take it hv dog team overland.
Mr. Crane looks for much greater
activity in the Chardalar district,
as $25,000 has been taken from one
creek alone, and good pay has been
struck on three claims adjoining this
property. Mr. Crane says that pros
pectors in the Yukon country are
complaining against the govern
ment’s failure to properly mark the
trails and he says his experience
of losing both feet as the result of
lack of markings is but one of the
similar experiences of pioneers
then-.
If the government has spent the
money it says it has on trails it
has not given results, and appropri
ations to carry on this work, which
means life or death to men on the
trails, should be forthcoming.
The government railroad, on which
Mr. Crane, was employed for five
years, is being built without any
squandering of public money, said
Crane, who stated the engineering
obstacles were not appreciated by
people, in the states, where railroads
do not as a rule have to do so much
blasting and make such heavy fills
as the Alaska engineering commis
sion encountered.
“We are thankful that the gov
ernment is building the railroad, but
to give the far north the full bene
fit of steel rails construction should
not stop until the railroad had been
extended to the Yukon river, so
that it can touch that section with
out the combination of overland and
water haul,” said Mr. Crane.
.1. L. McPherson, assistant to the
president of the chamber, and man
ager of the Alaska bureau, has writ
ten a letter to Edward McGrath,
U. S. railway mail superintendent,
urging that prompt consideration be
given to the appeal of Mr. Crane for
extension of the mail service to
B#aver city.
The Pacific Steamship Company
announces that the Admiral line will
have one sailing every 20 days to
southwestern Alaska and a sailing
every 10 days to southeastern Alas
ka. The City of Seattle will he
ready for Alaska business the first
of the year.
Confirming the data submitted to
the Alaska advisory committee sent
to Seattle last spring by John Car
ton Payne, secretary of the interior,
five Seattle-Alaska steamships were
laid up in winter quarters last week,
the vessels being the Victoria, Skag
way, and Santa Ana, of the Alaska
Steamship Company, and the City of
Seattle and Admiral Rodman of the
Pacific Steamship Company.
At the hearing of the Alaska ad
vistory committee here, the steam
ship companies submitted data show
ing that the Alaska business is sea
sonal. with one rush in the spring
and another in the fall and a period
of activity in the summer months.
This makes it necessary for the
steamship companies to earn more
revenue in the spring and fall rushes
and in the summer period than
would be the case if there was
enough business to keep the fleets in
operation In the winter time. Both
steamship companies last week cut
their northern passenger services for
the winter period.
Tourist travel by automobile
through the wilds of the great
north promises to be one of the
features of Alaskan life next sea
“After gathering in a plen
tiful harvest to tide them
over the next long winter,
the Pilgrims dedicated to
Providence a day of public
Thanksgiving. ”
A Bank Account With Us Should Be
Your Harvest for the Long Winter
“The Bank of Personal Service’’
son, according to word brought south
by steamships arriving this week.
The Richardson road improvement
from the interior to Valdez, it is
pointed out, makes it possible for
auto tourists to loop the loop more
than 1.000 miles of improved roads
in Yukon territory and Alaska.
Tourist travel over the Richarson
road promises to eclipse all previous
years in 1921. With a good auto
load open from salt water to Circle,
autoists from the states may bring
their machines to Whitehorse, thence
down the scenic Yukon by govern
ment road; then to Circle by steam
er, and out over the Richardson road
to Valdez, giving a swing of over
a thousand miles over Alaska roads,
through scenery which rivals that of
the Alps.
For Fuller Sanitary brushes write
Gene Glendenning, 102 Dietz Build
ing, Bremerton, Wash. Christmas
mail orders promptly filled. 9-tf.
Cordova Jazz Orchestra dance at
Eagle Hall Saturday night.
BIDS WANTED
The Copper River & Northwest
ern Railway Company require thirty
thousand (30,000) track ties for next
season’s work, and will consider bids
for any part or all of that number,
either hewed or sawed ties.
Specifications may be seen at the
office of the superintendent. Satis
factory bonds in the amount of
20 per cent of amount bid will be
required. Right is reserved to re
ject any or all bids. 16-10t.
Sixty Steam-Heated Rooms, Electric-Lighted ^
Hot and Cold Water in Every Room
With or Without Bath
Cordova House
Dooley & Greenig
Headquarters for Railroad and Mining Men
Satisfaction Guaranteed :: Rates Reasonable
■_ _
' **"*•^—————— - "
All Alaskan Trails end at the
Hotel Atwood
First Avenue and Pine Street
SEATTLE, WASH.
Nearest to Everything
Clean—Modern
J. A. FARNHAM and TED TALOR, Proprietors
Ted Taylor, Formerly Chief Steward Steamship Alaska and Mariposa
ini*■■■■ma auu,ainjaaMnw' '-WH-awmi'ii ua«iu i lUrtneanttratima* * —--—--(T-inr -Tinr ■mi mu «
1 STEAM HEAT Electric Lights jj
Overland Hotel j
MRS. J. W. KENNEDY
Chitina - - Alaska j
BEST BRANDS OF CIGARS POOL TABLE j
In Stock In Connection ^
Manhattan Hotel I
LOUISE DEJONGHE, Prop.
—- # I
Electric Lighted. Hot Water. Turkish and Tub
Baths.
OPPOSITE CORDOVA GRILL, CORDOVA,
PHONE 99

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